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      1. Author :
        Virostko, J. M.; Powers, A. C.; Jansen, E. D.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Design and Quality for Biomedical Technologies
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6849
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        bioluminescence imaging, BLI, bioluminescent tomography, diffusion, approximation, bioluminescence reconstruction, validation, optical tomography, simulation IVIS, Xenogen
      12. Abstract :
        This study examines the accuracy of the Living Image (R) Software 3D Analysis Package (Xenogen, Alameda, CA) in reconstruction of light source depth and intensity. Constant intensity light sources were placed in an optically homogeneous medium (chicken breast). Spectrally filtered images were taken at 560, 580, 600, 620, 640, and 660 nanometers. The Living Image (R) Software 3D Analysis Package was employed to reconstruct source depth and intensity using these spectrally filtered images. For sources shallower than the mean free path of light there was proportionally higher inaccuracy in reconstruction. For sources deeper than the mean free path, the average error in depth and intensity reconstruction was less than 4% and 12%, respectively. The ability to distinguish multiple sources decreased with increasing source depth and typically required a spatial separation of twice the depth. The constant intensity light sources were also implanted in mice to examine the effect of optical inhomogeneity. The reconstruction accuracy suffered in inhomogeneous tissue with accuracy influenced by the choice of optical properties used in reconstruction.
      13. URL :
        ://000255550500013"">://000255550500013
      14. Call Number :
        143962
      15. Serial :
        8098
      1. Author :
        Wilmink, G. J.; Carter, T.; Davidson, J. M.; Jansen, E. D.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Photonic Therapeutics and Diagnostics Iv
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6842
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        84200
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        preconditioning, heat shock protein 70 (hsp70), wound healing, chronic, wounds, adaptive response, hormesis, diabetes, heat-shock proteins, gene-expression, rat skin, hsp70, heat-shock-protein-70, apoptosis, temperature, protection, recovery, stimulation IVIS, Xenogen
      12. Abstract :
        Preconditioning tissues with an initial mild thermal stress, thereby eliciting a stress response, can serve to protect tissue from subsequent stresses. Patients at risk for impaired healing, such as diabetics, can benefit from therapeutic methods which enhance wound repair. We present a laser thermal preconditioning protocol that accelerates cutaneous wound repair in a murine model. A pulsed diode laser (lambda = 1.86 mu m, tau(p) =2 ms, 50 Hz, H = 7.64 mJ/cm(2)) was used to precondition mouse skin before incisional wounds were made. The preconditioning protocol was optimized in vitro and in vivo using hsp70 expression, cell viability, and temperature measurements as benchmarks. Hsp70 expression was non-invasively monitored using a transgenic mouse strain with the hsp70 promoter driving luciferase expression. Tissue temperature recordings were acquired in real time using an infrared camera. Wound repair was assessed by measuring hsp70 expression, biomechanical properties, and wound histology for up to 24 d. Bioluminescence (BLI) was monitored with the IVIS 200 System (Xenogen) and tensile properties with a tensiometer (BTC-2000). The in vivo BLI studies indicated that the optimized laser preconditioning protocol increased hsp70 expression by 15-fold. The tensiometer data revealed that laser preconditioned wounds are similar to 40% stronger than control wounds at 10 days post surgery. Similar experiments in a diabetic mouse model also enhanced wound repair strength. These results indicate that 1) noninvasive imaging methods can aid in the optimization of novel laser preconditioning methods; 2) that optimized preconditioning with a 1.86 mu m diode laser enhances early wound repair.
      13. URL :
        ://000255314100015"">://000255314100015
      14. Call Number :
        144364
      15. Serial :
        6736
      1. Author :
        Corbin, IR; Chen, J; Li, H; Cao, W; Zheng, G
      2. Title :
        Functionalizing low-density lipoprotein nanoparticles for in vivo near-infrared optical imaging of cancer
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Progress in Biomedical Optics and Engineering
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6626
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen
      12. Abstract :
        Low density lipoproteins (LDL) have long been recognized as a potential delivery system for exogenous agents. Imaging agents or drugs can be attached to LDL through surface loading, protein loading or core loading methods. The LDL delivery system has received considerable attention particularly among cancer biologists as it was observed that numerous cancers over-express the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). In this paper we investigate the utility of LDL to transport optical imaging contrast agents for caner detection. The method of loading fluorophores into the core of LDL is attractive as it behaves like an activatable contrast agent. Surface and protein labeled methods also prove to be effective strategies for tracing LDL nanoparticle activity. The strengths and limitations of the LDL carrier system are discussed and novel approaches for imaging cancer with LDL nanoparticles are highlighted.
      13. URL :
        N/A
      14. Call Number :
        137089
      15. Serial :
        6200
      1. Author :
        Palanker, D; Chalberg, T; Vankov, A; Huie, P; Molnar, F; Butterwick, A; Calos, M; Marmor, M; Blumenkranz, M
      2. Title :
        Plasma-mediated transfection of RPE
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2006
      5. Publication :
        Proc SPIE Ophthalmic Technol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6138
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        40917
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen
      12. Abstract :
        A major obstacle in applying gene therapy to clinical practice is the lack of efficient and safe gene delivery techniques. Viral delivery has encountered a number of serious problems including immunological reactions and malignancy. Non-viral delivery methods (liposomes, sonoporation and electroporation) have either low efficiency in-vivo or produce severe collateral damage to ocular tissues. We discovered that tensile stress greatly increases the susceptibility of cellular membranes to electroporation. For synchronous application of electric field and mechanical stress, both are generated by the electric discharge itself. A pressure wave is produced by rapid vaporization of the medium. To prevent termination of electric current by the vapor cavity it is ionized thus restoring its electric conductivity. For in-vivo experiments with rabbits a plasmid DNA was injected into the subretinal space, and RPE was treated trans-sclerally with an array of microelectodes placed outside the eye. Application of 250-300V and 100-200
      13. URL :
        N/A
      14. Call Number :
        141910
      15. Serial :
        7305
      1. Author :
        Axelgaard, Esben; #x00D8; stergaard, Jakob Appel; Haxha, Saranda; Thiel, Steffen; Hansen, Troels Krarup
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2017
      5. Publication :
        Mediators of Inflammation
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2017
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS; IVIS FLI in vivo
      12. Abstract :
        Increasingevidencelinksmannan-bindinglectin(MBL)tolatevascularcomplicationsofdiabetes.MBLisacomplement-activating pattern recognition molecule of the innate immune system that can mediate an inflammation response through activation of the lectin pathway. In two recent animal studies, we have shown that autoreactivity of MBL is increased in the kidney in diabetic nephropathy. We hypothesize that long-term exposure to uncontrolled high blood glucose in diabetes may mediate formation of neoepitopes in several tissues and that MBL is able to recognize these structures and thus activate the lectin pathway. To test this hypothesis, we induced diabetes by injection of low-dose streptozotocin in MBL double-knockout (MBL/DKO) mice. Development of diabetes was followed by measurements of blood glucose and urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Fluorophorelabelled recombinant MBL was injected intravenously in diabetic and nondiabetic mice followed by ex vivo imaging of several organs. We observed that MBL accumulated in the heart, liver, brain, lung, pancreas, and intestines of diabetic mice. We furthermore detected increased systemic complement activation after administration of MBL, thus indicating MBL-mediated systemic complement activation in these animals. These new findings indicate a global role of MBL during late diabetesmediated vascular complications in various tissues.
      13. URL :
        http://downloads.hindawi.com/journals/mi/2017/9403754.pdf
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @ 13437
      15. Serial :
        14211
      1. Author :
        Kalimuthu, Senthilkumar; Oh, Ji Min; Gangadaran, Prakash; Zhu, Liya; Lee, Ho Won; Rajendran, Ramya Lakshmi; Jeon, Yong Hyun; Jeong, Shin Young; Lee, Sang-Woo; Lee, Jaetae
      2. Title :
        In Vivo Tracking of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4-Engineered Mesenchymal Stem Cell Migration by Optical Molecular Imaging
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2017
      5. Publication :
        Stem cells international
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2017
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS; IVIS BLI in vivo
      12. Abstract :
        CXCR4,thestromalcell-derived factor-1receptor,playsanimportantroleinthemigration ofhematopoieticprogenitor/stem cells to injured and inflamed areas. Noninvasive cell tracking methods could be useful for monitoring cell fate. Therefore, in this study, weevaluatedtheefficacyofanintravenousinfusionofgeneticallyengineeredmesenchymalstemcells(MSCs)overexpressingCXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) to home to the tumor, by optical imaging. We constructed a retroviral vector containing CXCR with dual reporter genes, eGFP and Fluc2, under the control of an EF1α promoter (pBABE-EF1α-CXCR4-eGFP-IRES-Fluc2). We also developed an eGFP-Fluc2 construct in the Retro-X retroviral vector (Retro-X-eGFP-Fluc2). MSCs were transduced with retroviruses to generate CXCR4-overexpressing MSCs (MSC-CXCR4/Fluc2) and MSCs (MSC/Fluc2). CXCR4 mRNA and protein expression was confirmed by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively, and it was higher in MSC-CXCR4/Fluc2 than in naive MSCs. eGFP expression was confirmed by confocal microscopy. The transfected MSC-CXCR4/Fluc2 cells showed higher migratory capacity than naive MSCs observed in Transwell migration assay. The in vivo migration of CXCR4-overexpressing MSCs to MDAMB231/Rluc tumor model by BLI imaging was also confirmed. Intravenous delivery of genetically modified MSCs overexpressing CXCR4 with a Fluc2 reporter gene may be a useful, noninvasive BLI imaging tool for tracking cell fate.
      13. URL :
        N/A
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @ 14048
      15. Serial :
        14007
      1. Author :
        Jia, Lin; Ren, Shuguang; Li, Tao; Wu, Jianing; Zhou, Xinliang; Zhang, Yan; Wu, Jianhua; Liu, Wei
      2. Title :
        Effects of Combined Simultaneous and Sequential Endostar and Cisplatin Treatment in a Mice Model of Gastric Cancer Peritoneal Metastases
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2017
      5. Publication :
        Gastroenterology research and practice
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2017
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS; IVIS BLI in vivo
      12. Abstract :
        Aimed to study the effects of endostar and cisplatin using an in vivo imaging system (IVIS) in a model of peritoneal metastasisofgastriccancer.Methods.NUGC-4gastriccancercellstransfectedwithluciferasegene(NUGC-4-Luc)wereinjectedi.p. intonudemice.Oneweeklater,micewererandomlyinjectedi.p.:group1,cisplatin(d1–3)+endostar(d4–7);group2,endostar(d1– 4)+cisplatin(d5–7);group3,endostar+cisplatind1,4,and7;group4,salinefortwoweeks.Oneweekafterthefinaladministration, miceweresacrificed.Bioluminescentdata,microvesseldensity(MVD),andlymphaticvesseldensity(LVD)wereanalyzed.Results. Among the four groups, there were no significant differences in the weights and in the number of cancer cell photons on days 1 and 8 (AD – 1DepartmentofMedicalOncology,TheAffiliatedHospitalofHebeiUniversity,Baoding071000,China 2DepartmentofAnimalCenter,TheFourthHospital,HebeiMedicalUniversity,Shijiazhuang050017,China 3DepartmentofEpidemiologyandHealthStatistics,SchoolofPublicHealth,HebeiMedicalUniversity,Shijiazhuang050011,China 4HebeiProvinceChina-JapanFriendshipCenterforCancerDetection,Shijiazhuang050017,China 5DepartmentofMedicalOncology,TheFourthHospital,HebeiMedicalUniversity,Shijiazhuang050017,China 6DepartmentofPalliativeCareCenter,BeijingCancerHospital,Beijing100000,China CorrespondenceshouldbeaddressedtoWeiLiu;liuweihebei1026@163.com
      13. URL :
        N/A
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @ 13222
      15. Serial :
        14017
      1. Author :
        Moreno, R; Rojas, LA; Villellas, Felip Vilardell; Soriano, Vanessa Cervera; García-Castro, J; Fajardo, CA; Alemany, R
      2. Title :
        Human Menstrual Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells as Potential Cell Carriers for Oncolytic Adenovirus
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2017
      5. Publication :
        Stem Cells International
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2017
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS; IVIS FLI in vivo
      12. Abstract :
        Antitumor efficacy of systemically administered oncolytic adenoviruses (OAdv) is limited due to diverse factors such as liver sequestration, neutralizing interactions in blood, elimination by the immune system, and physical barriers in tumors. It is therefore of clinical relevance to improve OAdv bioavailability and tumor delivery. Among the variety of tumor-targeting strategies, the use of stem cells and specifically bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) is of particular interest due to their tumor tropism and immunomodulatory properties. Nonetheless, the invasive methods to obtain these cells, the low number of MSCs present in the bone marrow, and their restricted in vitro expansion represent major obstacles for their use in cancer treatments, pointing out the necessity to identify an alternative source of MSCs. Here, we have evaluated the use of menstrual blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MenSCs) as cell carriers for regional delivery of an OAdv in the tumor. Our results indicate that MenSCs can be isolated without invasive methods, they have an increased proliferation rate compared to BM-MSCs, and they can be efficiently infected with different serotype 5-based capsid-modified adenoviruses, leading to viral replication and release. In addition, our in vivo studies confirmed the tumor-homing properties of MenSCs after regional administration.
      13. URL :
        N/A
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @ 13794
      15. Serial :
        13873
      1. Author :
        Cao, Juan; Hou, Shike; Ding, Hui; Liu, Ziquan; Song, Meijuan; Qin, Xiaojing; Wang, Xue; Yu, Mengyang; Sun, Zhiguang; Liu, Jinyang
      2. Title :
        In Vivo Tracking of Systemically Administered Allogeneic Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Normal Rats through Bioluminescence Imaging
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2016
      5. Publication :
        Stem Cells International
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2016
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS BLI in vivo; IVIS BLI in vitro
      12. Abstract :
        Recently,mesenchymalstemcells(MSCs)areincreasinglyusedasapanaceaformultipletypesofdiseaseshortofeffectivetreatment. Dozens of clinical trials published demonstrated strikingly positive therapeutic effects of MSCs. However, as a specific agent, little research has focused on the dynamic distribution of MSCs after in vivo administration. In this study, we track systemically transplantedallogeneicbonemarrowmesenchymalstemcells(BMSCs)innormalratsthroughbioluminescenceimaging(BLI)in realtime.Exvivoorganimaging,immunohistochemistry(IHC),andRT-PCRwereconductedtoverifythehistologicaldistribution ofBMSCs.OurresultsshowedthatBMSCshometothedorsalskinapartfromthelungsandkidneysaftertailveininjectionand couldnotbedetected14dayslater.AllogeneicBMSCsmainlyappearednotattheparenchymatousorgansbutatthesubepidermal connective tissue and adipose tissue in healthy rats. There were no significant MSCs-related adverse effects except for transient decreaseinneutrophils.Thesefindingswillprovideexperimentalevidencesforabetterunderstandingofthebiocharacteristicsof BMSCs.
      13. URL :
        N/A
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 11914
      15. Serial :
        20089
      1. Author :
        Cai, Wei Xin; Zheng, Li Wu; Ma, Li; Huang, Hong Zhang; Yu, Ru Qing; Zwahlen, Roger A
      2. Title :
        Tumorigenicity and Validity of Fluorescence Labelled Mesenchymal and Epithelial Human Oral Cancer Cell Lines in Nude Mice
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2016
      5. Publication :
        BioMed Research International
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2016
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS; IVIS FLI in vivo
      12. Abstract :
        Tumorigenicity and metastatic activity can be visually monitored in cancer cells that were labelled with stable fluorescence. The aim was to establish and validate local and distant spread of subcutaneously previously injected fluorescence transduced human tongue cancer cell lines of epithelial and mesenchymal phenotype in nude mice. A total of 32 four-week-old male athymic Balb/c nude mice were randomly allocated into 4 groups (). A single dose of 0.3 mL PBS containing 1 × 107 of four different cancer cell-lines (UM1, UM1-GFP, UM2, and UM2-RFP) was injected subcutaneously into the right side of their posterolateral back. Validity assessment of the labelled cancer cells’ tumorigenicity was assessed by physical examination, imaging, and histology four weeks after the injection. The tumor take rate of cancer cells was similar in animals injected with either parental or transduced cancer cells. Transduced cancer cells in mice were easily detectable in vivo and after cryosection using fluorescent imaging. UM1 cells showed increased tumor take rate and mean tumor volume, presenting with disorganized histopathological patterns. Fluorescence labelled epithelial and mesenchymal human tongue cancer cell lines do not change in tumorigenicity or cell phenotype after injection in vivo.
      13. URL :
        N/A
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 12614
      15. Serial :
        20093
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