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      1. Author :
        Sui, Hua; Zhao, Jihui; Zhou, Lihong; Wen, Haotian; Deng, Wanli; Li, Chunpu; Ji, Qing; Liu, Xuan; Feng, Yuanyuan; Chai, Ni; Zhang, Qibo; Cai, Jianfeng; Li, Qi
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2017
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Letters
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        403
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Tanshinone IIA; Colorectal cancer; Hypoxia; Angiogenesis; β-catenin/TCF/LEF signaling pathway; TGF-β; HIF-1α; IVIS; IVIS BLI in vivo
      12. Abstract :
        In a previous study, we demonstrated that Tanshinone IIA effectively inhibits CRC angiogenesis in vivo, but the underlying mechanisms were not elucidated. In this report, we describe experiments in which HIF-1α levels were manipulated to probe the effect of hypoxia on CRC cell angiogenesis. We studied the effects of Tan IIA on CRC pro-angiogenic factor and on human umbilical vein endothelial cell angiogenesis in normoxia and hypoxia. Our results show that Tan IIA not only lowers HIF-1α levels and inhibits secretion of VEGF and bFGF, but also efficiently suppresses the proliferation, tube formation and metastasis of HUVECs. Interruption of the HIF-1α/β-catenin/TCF3/LEF1 signaling pathway occurs in the hypoxic microenvironment. The mechanism involves HIF-1α inhibition of TGF-β1 secretion, which drives angiogenesis by promoting β-catenin nuclear localization and TCF/LEF activation. To test an improved delivery system for Tan IIA, we loaded the drug into mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN-NH2) and found that it effectively targets HIF-1α overexpression in a mouse colon tumor model. Finally, Tan IIA sodium sulfonate exhibits anti-angiogenesis activity in CRC patients by reducing levels of angiogenin, VEGF and bFGF expression. Our research provides a new anti-angiogenesis strategy and strengthens support for the use of Tan IIA as an angiogenesis inhibitor.
      13. URL :
        http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304383517303476
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @ 13972
      15. Serial :
        13723
      1. Author :
        Piaggio, F; Kondylis, V; Pastorino, F; Di Paolo, D; Perri, P; Cossu, I; Schorn, F; Marinaccio, C; Murgia, D; Daga, A
      2. Title :
        A novel liposomal Clodronate depletes tumor-associated macrophages in primary and metastatic melanoma: Anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor effects
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2015
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Controlled Release
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        TAMs;; Liposomal Clodronate;; Adjuvant therapy;; Melanoma; IVIS; IVIS BLI in vivo
      12. Abstract :
        The depletion of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), involved in different stages of cancer development and progression, is an appealing strategy in cancer therapy. We developed novel Clodronate-containing liposomes (Clo-Lipo-DOTAP) presenting physicochemical properties (size distribution, polydispersity index and Z-potential) suited for safe storage and injections. In vitro, Clo-Lipo-DOTAP inhibited proliferation, reduced viability and induced apoptosis of a macrophage-like cell line in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In proof of functionality experiments, Clo-Lipo-DOTAP depleted macrophages in a genetic mouse model of chronic hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma leading to a significant reduction of F4/80-positive cells in the liver and spleen of treated mice compared to PBS-treated controls. The number of granulocytes, B and T lymphocytes was not affected. In B16/F10 subcutaneous melanoma-bearing mice, Clo-Lipo-DOTAP significantly reduced the volume of primary tumors (P < 0.001). Within the tumors, the expression F4/80 and α-SMA was significantly lowered. Plasma levels of IL-10, Mo KC, TNF-α, VEGF and PDGF-bb were statistically decreased. In B16/F10 lung metastatic melanoma model, treatment with Clo-Lipo-DOTAP significantly reduced the number of pulmonary nodules (P < 0.05). F4/80-positive cells and microvessel density were statistically decreased. In conclusion, the depletion of TAMs in primary and metastatic melanoma presents anti-tumor efficacy via inhibition of angiogenesis and modulation of inflammation related cytokines.
      13. URL :
        N/A
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 10597
      15. Serial :
        20498
      1. Author :
        Ong, Hooi-Tin; Federspiel, Mark J.; Guo, Chang M.; Lucien Ooi, London; Russell, Stephen J.; Peng, Kah-Whye; Hui, Kam M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2013
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Hepatology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Systemic virotherapy; Oncolytic measles virus; Hepatocellular carcinoma; Orthotopically implanted HCC tumor model; Mesenchymal stem cells as cell delivery vehicles; Human neutralizing antibody
      12. Abstract :
        AbstractBackground & aims Although attenuated measles virus (MV) has demonstrated potent oncolytic activities towards human cancers, it has not yet been widely adopted into clinical practice. One of the major hurdles is the presence of pre-existing anti-MV immunity in the recipients. In this study, we have evaluated the combination of the potent oncolytic activity of the attenuated MV with the unique immunoprivileged and tumor-tropic biological properties of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-hMSCs) to combat human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) orthotopically implanted in SCID mice passively immunized with human neutralizing antibodies against MV as a preclinical model. Methods SCID mice were orthotopically implanted with patient-derived HCC tissues and established HCC cell lines. SCID mice were passively immunized with human neutralizing anti-measles antibodies. Bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging were employed to monitor the ability of systemically delivered MV-infected BM-hMSCs to infiltrate the implanted tumors and their effects on tumor growth. Results Systemically delivered MV-infected BM-hMSCs homed to the HCC tumors implanted orthotopically in the liver and it was evidenced that BM-hMSCs could transfer MV infectivity to HCC via heterofusion. Furthermore, therapy with MV-infected BM-hMSCs resulted in significantly inhibition of tumor growth in both measles antibody-naïve and passively-immunized SCID mice. In contrast, when cell-free MV viruses were delivered systemically, antitumor activity was evident only in measles antibody-naïve SCID mice. Conclusions
      13. URL :
        http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168827813004571
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @ 5278
      15. Serial :
        14728
      1. Author :
        Zheng, Bin; Wang, Jingya; Pan, Huizhuo; Chen, Hongbin; Ji, Wanying; Liao, Zhenyu; Gong, Xiaoqun; Wang, Hanjie; Chang, Jin
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2017
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Colloid and Interface Science
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        506
      8. Issue :
        Supplement C
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Synergy therapy; Gene therapy; Photothermal therapy; Tungsten oxide nanocrystals; IVIS; IVIS FLI in vivo
      12. Abstract :
        Combination of gene therapy and photothermal therapy (PTT) has drawn much attention in cancer therapy in recent years. However, this joint treatment process lacks fluorescence imaging visualization guidance that limits its clinical applications in oncotherapy. Herein, we report the use of gene therapy and tungsten oxide (W18O49, WO) synthetized with template method for combined PTT of cancer. In this system, a novel nanoplatform, with Bax gene, WO and indocyanine green (ICG) loaded in mesoporous silica nanoparticle had been successfully constructed, which was used as the near-infrared imaging-guided gene/optothermal multi-modal oncotherapy. These nanoparticles could achieve a synergistic therapy effect of gene therapy and PTT for tumor under 808nm near-infrared (NIR) laser excitation. In vivo animal experiments showed that they could cause solid tumor regression under 808nm NIR light irradiation, revealing the potential of these nanocomposites as a fluorescence imaging-guided multi-modal therapeutic nanosystem for tumor visual synergistic treatment.
      13. URL :
        http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0021979717308445
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @ 14113
      15. Serial :
        13553
      1. Author :
        Man, Kwan; Cheng, Qiao; Lam, Tung-Tuen; Ng, Kevin T.; Liu, Xiao-Bing; Fan, Sheung-Tat
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Proceedings of the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        50
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        770
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Surgery (Medical Sciences), Immune System (Chemical Coordination and, Homeostasis), Digestive System (Ingestion and Assimilation), Tumor, Biology, 00520, General biology – Symposia, transactions and proceedings, 02506, Cytology – Animal, 10064, Biochemistry studies – Proteins,, peptides and amino acids, 11105, Anatomy and Histology – Surgery, 12502, Pathology – General, 12512, Pathology – Therapy, 14004,, Digestive system – Physiology and biochemistry, 14006, Digestive, system – Pathology, 14508, Cardiovascular system – Blood vessel, pathology, 15002, Blood – Blood and lymph studies, 15004, Blood -, Blood cell studies, 16004, Respiratory system – Physiology and, biochemistry, 16006, Respiratory system – Pathology, 24003, Neoplasms, – Immunology, 24004, Neoplasms – Pathology, clinical aspects and, systemic effects, 34502, Immunology – General and methods, 34508,, Immunology – Immunopathology, tissue immunology, Rodentia, Mammalia, Vertebrata, Chordata, Animalia, Animals,, Chordates, Mammals, Nonhuman Vertebrates, Nonhuman Mammals, Rodents,, Vertebrates, Muridae [86375], [rat, (male, strain-Buffalo)], protein markers/IP10, 89367-92-0, (inflammatory chemokine)/myelin, basic protein, MBP, (expression), histology, laboratory techniques, histology and cytology, techniques/hepatectomy, therapeutic and prophylactic techniques,, clinical techniques/immunostaining, laboratory techniques, immunologic, techniques/proteomic screening, laboratory techniques, genetic, techniques/Xenogen in vivo imaging system, clinical techniques,, diagnostic techniques, blood, blood and lymphatics/liver, digestive system/lung, respiratory, system/CD34-positive cell, immune system, blood and, lymphatics/macrophages, immune system, blood and, lymphatics/hemopoietic progenitor cell, blood and, lymphatics/CD133-positive cell, blood and lymphatics/bone marrow, cells, BMC, immune system, blood and lymphatics/endothelial progenitor, cells, EPC, immune system, blood and lymphatics/VEGFR2-positive cell, blood and lymphatics IVIS, Xenogen
      12. Abstract :
        .
      13. URL :
        ://BIOSIS:PREV200900495894"">://BIOSIS:PREV200900495894
      14. Call Number :
        140866
      15. Serial :
        5331
      1. Author :
        Linehan, Jonathan L.; Tian, Xinghui; Morris, Julie K.; Kaufman, Dan S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Blood
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        106
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        370
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Surgery (Medical Sciences), Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Blood and Lymphatics (Transport and Circulation), 00520, General biology – Symposia, transactions and proceedings, 02506, Cytology – Animal, 02508, Cytology – Human, 10060, Biochemistry, studies – General, 10802, Enzymes – General and comparative studies:, coenzymes, 11105, Anatomy and Histology – Surgery, 12512, Pathology -, Therapy, 15002, Blood – Blood and lymph studies, 15004, Blood – Blood, cell studies, 25502, Development and Embryology – General and, descriptive, 34502, Immunology – General and methods, Primates, Mammalia, Vertebrata, Chordata, Animalia, Animals,, Chordates, Humans, Mammals, Primates, Vertebrates, Hominidae [86215], [human, (embryo)]/Rodentia, Mammalia, Vertebrata, Chordata, Animalia, Animals, Chordates, Mammals, Nonhuman Vertebrates, Nonhuman Mammals,, Rodents, Vertebrates, Muridae [86375], [mouse, (strain-NOD/ SCID)], luciferase, 76106-81-5/EF1-alpha, flow cytometry, laboratory techniques, histology and cytology, techniques/immunohistochemistry, laboratory techniques, histology and, cytology techniques, immunologic techniques/hematopoietic stem cell, transplantation, therapeutic and prophylactic techniques, clinical, techniques/bioluminescence imaging, laboratory techniques, imaging and, microscopy techniques, bone marrow, immune system, blood and lymphatics/hematopoietic stem, cell, blood and lymphatics/CD34 positive cell, immune system, blood, and lymphatics/CD45-positive cells, immune system, blood and lymphatics IVIS, Xenogen
      12. Abstract :
        Animal transplantation models are essential to characterize the long-term in vivo engraftment capacity of putative hematopoietic stem cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We have previously demonstrated that hESCs can be routinely utilized to derive multiple hematopoietic cell lineages. Here, we use in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) of stable luciferase (luc)-expressing hESCs to noninvasively monitor the dynamics of transplantation, engraftment, and growth of hESC-defived hematopoietic cells within individual animals over an extended time course. Luc expression under control of an EF1 alpha promoter was introduced into the H1 hESC line using a self-inactivating lentiviral vector. Undifferentiated hESC colonies that stably expressed luciferase were established and selected, and the pluripotent capability of luc+ hESCs was first explored by teratoma formation. Undifferentiated luc+ human ES cells were intramuscularly injected into NOD/SCID mice. The dynamics of survival and growth of the hESCs was monitored by BLI using the IVIS Imaging System (Xenogen) at regular time points post-transplantation. There was a decrease of luminescent signal during the first 1-2 weeks. This was followed by a dramatic increase in luminescent signals after about 5 weeks, which correlated with teratoma size. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed stable luc-expression in multiple differentiated cell types within the teratomas. We next used BLI to examine luc+ H1hESCs that were induced to undergo hematopoietic differentiation by co-culture with S17 cells, to give rise to H1/S17 cells. Flow cytometric studies confirmed hematopoietic cells (CD34+, CD45+, CD31+, and c-kit+ cells) were derived from these differentiated luc+ hESCs, with 5-10% of H1/S17 cells being CD34+. Hematopoietic progenitors that gave rise to colonies of mature luc+ blood cells in a standard CFU assay were also observed from the H1/S17 cells. Luc-expression of differentiated hESCs was maintained at similar levels to those of the undifferentiated ES cells. To define the in vivo potential of luc+hESC-derived hematopoietic cells, hESCs were allowed to differentiate on S17 cells for two weeks. SCID-repopulating cell studies were done by intravenous (iv) injection into sublethally irradiated NOD/SCID mice. After iv injection of 2-3 x 10(6) unsorted luc+ H1/S17 cells, BLI showed the brightest signal in the lung at day 0 (within 2 hours), followed by a rapid decline in signal on the next day (dayl). On day 8, most luc+ cells were detected in the abdomen and liver. Subsequently, after 6-12 weeks, multiple engraftment loci were identified in hematopoietic tissues. Flow cytometric analysis of bone marrow from these mice confirmed the presence of hESC-defived human CD45+ cells. Engraftment was also demonstrated after direct intrabone marrow injection with as few as 60,000 CD34+ cells sorted from luc+ H1/S17 cells. Again, stable engraftment can be monitored by BLI for 8+ weeks. These results demonstrate that BLI has several important advantages as an effective non-invasive approach to track and quantitatively monitor in vivo engraftment of hematopoietic or other cell lineages derived from hESCs.
      13. URL :
        ://BIOSIS:PREV200600183640"">://BIOSIS:PREV200600183640
      14. Call Number :
        140491
      15. Serial :
        6459
      1. Author :
        Spaliviero, Massimiliano; Harmsen, Stefan; Huang, Ruimin; Wall, Matthew A; Andreou, Chrysafis; Eastham, James A; Touijer, Karim A; Scardino, Peter T; Kircher, Moritz F
      2. Title :
        Detection of Lymph Node Metastases with SERRS Nanoparticles
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2016
      5. Publication :
        Molecular Imaging and Biology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering,; Raman imaging,; Prostate cancer,; Lymph node metastasis,; Intraoperative imaging; IVIS; IVIS BLI in vivo
      12. Abstract :
        Purpose: The accurate detection of lymph node metastases in prostate cancer patients is important to direct treatment decisions. Our goal was to develop an intraoperative imaging approach to distinguish normal from metastasized lymph nodes. We aimed at developing and testing gold-silica surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) nanoparticles that demonstrate high uptake within normal lymphatic tissue and negligible uptake in areas of metastatic replacement. Procedures: We evaluated the ability of SERRS nanoparticles to delineate lymph node metastases in an orthotopic prostate cancer mouse model using PC-3 cells transduced with mCherry fluorescent protein. Tumor-bearing mice (n = 6) and non-tumor-bearing control animals (n = 4) were injected intravenously with 30 fmol/g SERRS nanoparticles. After 16–18 h, the retroperitoneal lymph nodes were scanned in situ and ex vivo with a Raman imaging system and a handheld Raman scanner and data corroborated with fluorescence imaging for mCherry protein expression and histology. Results: The SERRS nanoparticles demonstrated avid homing to normal lymph nodes, but not to metastasized lymph nodes. In cases where lymph nodes were partially infiltrated by tumor cells, the SERRS signal correctly identified, with sub-millimeter precision, healthy from metastasized components. Conclusions: This study serves as a first proof-of-principle that SERRS nanoparticles enable high precision and rapid intraoperative discrimination between normal and metastasized lymph nodes.
      13. URL :
        N/A
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 11224
      15. Serial :
        19477
      1. Author :
        Hung, Chia-Chian; Huang, Wen-Chia; Lin, Yi-Wen; Yu, Ting-Wei; Chen, Hsin-Hung; Lin, Sung-Chyr; Chiang, Wen-Hsuan; Chiu, Hsin-Cheng
      2. Title :
        Active Tumor Permeation and Uptake of Surface Charge-Switchable Theranostic Nanoparticles for Imaging-Guided Photothermal/Chemo Combinatorial Therapy
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2015
      5. Publication :
        Theranostics 2016
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        surface charge transition,; deep tumor penetration,; tumor hypoxia,; photothermal therapy,; chemotherapy; IVIS; IVIS FLI in vitro; IVIS FLI in vivo; IVIS FLI ex vivo
      12. Abstract :
        To significantly promote tumor uptake and penetration of therapeutics, a nanovehicle system comprising poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) as the hydrophobic cores coated with pH-responsive N-acetyl histidine modified D-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate (NAcHis-TPGS) is developed in this work. The nanocarriers with switchable surface charges in response to tumor extracellular acidity (pHe) were capable of selectively co-delivering indocyanine green (ICG), a photothermal agent, and doxorubicin (DOX), a chemotherapy drug, to tumor sites. The in vitro cellular uptake of ICG/DOX-loaded nanoparticles by cancer cells and macrophages was significantly promoted in weak acidic environments due to the increased protonation of the NAcHis moieties. The results of in vivo and ex vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated that upon intravenous injection the theranostic nanoparticles were substantially accumulated in TRAMP-C1 solid tumor of tumor-bearing mice. Immunohistochemical examination of tumor sections confirmed the active permeation of the nanoparticles into deep tumor hypoxia due to their small size, pHe-induced near neutral surface, and the additional hitchhiking transport via tumor-associated macrophages. The prominent imaging-guided photothermal therapy of ICG/DOX-loaded nanoparticles after tumor accumulation induced extensive tumor tissue/ vessel ablation, which further promoted their extravasation and DOX tumor permeation, thus effectively suppressing tumor growth.
      13. URL :
        N/A
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 10584
      15. Serial :
        20763
      1. Author :
        Patsula, Vitalii; Kosinova, Lucie; Lovric, Marija; Ferhatovic, Lejla; Rabyk, Mariia; Konefal, Rafal; Paruzel, Aleksandra; Slouf, Miroslav; Herynek, Vít; Gajovic, Srecko
      2. Title :
        Superparamagnetic Fe3O4 Nanoparticles: Synthesis by Thermal Decomposition of Iron (III) Glucuronate and Application in Magnetic Resonance Imaging
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2016
      5. Publication :
        ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        superparamagnetic;; nanoparticles;; iron oxide;; thermal decomposition;; magnetic resonance imaging; IVIS; IVIS BLI in vitro
      12. Abstract :
        Monodisperse superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles coated with oleic acid were prepared by thermal decomposition of Fe(III) glucuronate. The shape, size, and particle size distribution were controlled by varying the reaction parameters, such as the reaction temperature, concentration of the stabilizer, and type of high-boiling-point solvents. Magnetite particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), as well as electron diffraction (SAED), X-ray diffraction (XRD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and magnetometer measurements. The particle coating was analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and attenuated total reflection (ATR) Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectroscopy. To make the Fe3O4 nanoparticles dispersible in water, the particle surface was modified with α-carboxyl-ω-bis(ethane-2,1-diyl)phosphonic acid-terminated poly(3-O-methacryloyl-α-D-glucopyranose) (PMG–P). For future practical biomedical applications, nontoxicity plays a key role, and the PMG–P&Fe3O4 nanoparticles were tested on rat mesenchymal stem cells to determine the particle toxicity and their ability to label the cells. MR relaxometry confirmed that the PMG–P&Fe3O4 nanoparticles had high relaxivity but rather low cellular uptake. Nevertheless, the labeled cells still provided visible contrast enhancement in the magnetic resonance image. In addition, the cell viability was not compromised by the nanoparticles. Therefore, the PMG–P&Fe3O4 nanoparticles have the potential to be used in biomedical applications, especially as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.
      13. URL :
        N/A
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 11185
      15. Serial :
        19590
      1. Author :
        Bronsart, Laura; Nguyen, Linh; Habtezion, Aida; Contag, Christopher
      2. Title :
        Reactive Oxygen Species Imaging in a Mouse Model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2016
      5. Publication :
        Molecular Imaging and Biology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Superoxide anion; Reactive oxygen species; Inflammatory bowel disease; Coelenterazine; Imaging; IVIS; IVIS chemoluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        Purpose Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important contributors to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, there are insufficient tools for their in vivo evaluation. Procedures To determine if a chemiluminescent ROS reporter, coelenterazine, would be a useful tool for the detection of immune cell activation, the macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7) was treated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). Additionally, coelenterazine was used to monitor the changes in ROS production over time in a mouse model of IBD. Results In vitro, coelenterazine enabled the dynamic monitoring of the RAW 264.7 cell oxidative burst. In vivo, there were early, preclinical, changes in the localization and magnitude of coelenterazine chemiluminescent foci. Conclusions Coelenterazine offers a high-throughput method for assessing immune cell activation in culture and provides a means for the in vivo detection and localization of ROS during IBD disease progression.
      13. URL :
        N/A
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 11105
      15. Serial :
        20098
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