1. Resources
  2. Citations Library

Citation Details

You are viewing citation details. You can save or export citation(s) below, access an article, or start a new search.

91–100 of 7666 records found matching your query:
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All

Headers act as filters

      1. Author :
        Hurrell, Benjamin P.; Schuster, Steffen; Grün, Eva; Coutaz, Manuel; Williams, Roderick A.; Held, Werner; Malissen, Bernard; Malissen, Marie; Yousefi, Shida; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Müller, Andreas J.; Tacchini-Cottier, Fabienne
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2015
      5. Publication :
        PLoS Pathog
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        11
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS; IVIS BLI in vivo
      12. Abstract :
        <title>Author Summary</title> <p>Infection with the protozoan <italic>Leishmania</italic> parasites causes a spectrum of diseases ranging from cutaneous to visceral forms that are fatal if left untreated. Among the different <italic>Leishmania</italic> species, <italic>Leishmania mexicana</italic> causes chronic cutaneous lesions in humans. To study this disease, we used a murine model. Following infection with <italic>Leishmania mexicana</italic>, most mouse species including C57BL/6 develop chronic non-healing lesion. Within hours of infection, neutrophils are recruited locally and they ingest the parasites. Although neutrophils are leukocytes that are able to rapidly kill pathogens using an arsenal of molecules, several microorganisms including some, but not all, <italic>Leishmania</italic> species are able to survive within these cells. Here, we show that <italic>L</italic>. <italic>mexicana</italic> elicits the rapid recruitment of neutrophils at the site of infection, survives within these cells and uses them to its advantage. Furthermore, transient parasite sequestration by neutrophils delays recruitment of other leukocytes such as monocytes, contributing to the impaired development of a protective immune response against the parasite and chronic lesion development. Thus, we describe a previously unanticipated pathogenic role for neutrophils in chronic lesion development. More importantly, our data suggest that in certain forms of cutaneous leishmaniasis, regulating neutrophil recruitment could be a strategy to promote lesion healing.</p>
      13. URL :
        http://dx.doi.org/10.1371%2Fjournal.ppat.1004929
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 9589
      15. Serial :
        20760
      1. Author :
        Burke, Crystal W.; Bridges, Olga; Brown, Sherri; Rahija, Richard; Russell, Charles J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2013
      5. Publication :
        PLoS pathogens
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        9
      8. Issue :
        11
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Male; Mice; Respiratory System; Respirovirus Infections; Sendai virus; Viral Tropism
      12. Abstract :
        Little is known about how the mode of respiratory virus transmission determines the dynamics of primary infection and protection from reinfection. Using non-invasive imaging of murine parainfluenza virus 1 (Sendai virus) in living mice, we determined the frequency, timing, dynamics, and virulence of primary infection after contact and airborne transmission, as well as the tropism and magnitude of reinfection after subsequent challenge. Contact transmission of Sendai virus was 100% efficient, phenotypically uniform, initiated and grew to robust levels in the upper respiratory tract (URT), later spread to the lungs, grew to a lower level in the lungs than the URT, and protected from reinfection completely in the URT yet only partially in the lungs. Airborne transmission through 7.6-cm and 15.2-cm separations between donor and recipient mice was 86%-100% efficient. The dynamics of primary infection after airborne transmission varied between individual mice and included the following categories: (a) non-productive transmission, (b) tracheal dominant, (c) tracheal initiated yet respiratory disseminated, and (d) nasopharyngeal initiated yet respiratory disseminated. Any previous exposure to Sendai virus infection protected from mortality and severe morbidity after lethal challenge. Furthermore, a higher level of primary infection in a given respiratory tissue (nasopharynx, trachea, or lungs) was inversely correlated with the level of reinfection in that same tissue. Overall, the mode of transmission determined the dynamics and tropism of primary infection, which in turn governed the level of seroconversion and protection from reinfection. These data are the first description of the dynamics of respiratory virus infection and protection from reinfection throughout the respiratory tracts of living animals after airborne transmission. This work provides a basis for understanding parainfluenza virus transmission and protective immunity and for developing novel vaccines and non-pharmaceutical interventions.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24278024
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        11696
      1. Author :
        Chen, Heng-Li; Su, Pei-Yi; Chang, Ya-Shu; Wu, Szu-Yao; Liao, You-Di; Yu, Hui-Ming; Lauderdale, Tsai-Ling; Chang, Kaichih; Shih, Chiaho
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2013
      5. Publication :
        PLoS Pathog
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        9
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS Imaging, novel
      12. Abstract :
        <title>Author Summary</title><p>Antibiotics-resistant pathogens have been a major problem to our public health. Recently, in our studies of human hepatitis B virus (HBV), we accidentally discovered potent and broad spectrum antimicrobial peptides from HBV core protein (HBc) arginine-rich domain (ARD). The peptides are mainly composed of SPRRR repeats and are effective against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, as well as fungi. We found different bactericidal mechanisms of the ARD peptides, which involved LPS binding, DNA binding and membrane permeabilization in various tested bacteria, such as <italic>P. aeruginosa</italic>, <italic>K. pneumoniae</italic>, <italic>E. coli</italic> and <italic>S. aureus</italic>. We also found that this ARD peptide was effective for colistin-resistant <italic>A. baumannii</italic>. The peptides exhibited no hemolysis activity to human red blood cells and no cytotoxicity to human hepatoma cells and kidney cells. Furthermore, the ARD peptide was shown to be safe and protective in the animal model. Recently, intestinal flora was found to influence the development of immunity. We discussed here the potential involvement of the antimicrobial activity of HBc ARD in the establishment of HBV chronic infection in the newborns. We proposed here that the HBc ARD peptides could serve as an alternative to the conventional antibiotics in clinical medicine.</p>
      13. URL :
        http://dx.doi.org/10.1371%2Fjournal.ppat.1003425
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @ 5138
      15. Serial :
        14789
      1. Author :
        Lu, Shun; Liu, Shuya; Wietelmann, Astrid; Kojonazarov, Baktybek; Atzberger, Ann; Tang, Cong; Schermuly, Ralph Theo; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Offermanns, Stefan
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2017
      5. Publication :
        Plos One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        12
      8. Issue :
        8
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Quantum GX
      12. Abstract :
        GPR116 (ADGRF5) and ELTD1 (ADGRL4) belong to different subfamilies of the adhesion G-protein-coupled receptor group but are both expressed in endothelial cells. We therefore analyzed their functions in mice lacking these receptors. While loss of GPR116 or ELTD1 alone had no obvious effect on cardiovascular or kidney function, mice lacking both, GPR116 and ELTD1, showed malformations of the aortic arch arteries and the cardiac outflow tract leading to perinatal lethality in about 50% of the mutants. In addition to cardiovascular malformations, surviving mice developed renal thrombotic microangiopathy as well as hemolysis and splenomegaly, and their lifespan was significantly reduced. Loss of GPR116 and ELTD1 specifically in endothelial cells or neural crest-derived cells did not recapitulate any of the phenotypes observed in GPR116-ELTD1 double deficient mice, indicating that loss of GPR116 and ELTD1 expressed by other cells accounts for the observed cardiovascular and renal defects.
      13. URL :
        https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183166
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 13884
      15. Serial :
        17169
      1. Author :
        Tseng, Jen-Chieh; Narayanan, Nara; Ho, Guojie; Groves, Kevin; Delaney, Jeannine; Bao, Bagna; Zhang, Jun; Morin, Jeffrey; Kossodo, Sylvie; Rajopadhye, Milind; Peterson, Jeffrey D.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2017
      5. Publication :
        Plos One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        12
      8. Issue :
        8
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Fmt
      12. Abstract :
        Physical measurement of tumor volume reduction is the most commonly used approach to assess tumor progression and treatment efficacy in mouse tumor models. However, it is relatively insensitive, and often requires long treatment courses to achieve gross physical tumor destruction. As alternatives, several non-invasive imaging methods such as bioluminescence imaging (BLI), fluorescence imaging (FLI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have been developed for more accurate measurement. As tumors have elevated glucose metabolism, 18F-fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) has become a sensitive PET imaging tracer for cancer detection, diagnosis, and efficacy assessment by measuring alterations in glucose metabolism. In particular, the ability of 18F-FDG imaging to detect drug-induced effects on tumor metabolism at a very early phase has dramatically improved the speed of decision-making regarding treatment efficacy. Here we demonstrated an approach with FLI that offers not only comparable performance to PET imaging, but also provides additional benefits, including ease of use, imaging throughput, probe stability, and the potential for multiplex imaging. In this report, we used sorafenib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor clinically approved for cancer therapy, for treatment of a mouse tumor xenograft model. The drug is known to block several key signaling pathways involved in tumor metabolism. We first identified an appropriate sorafenib dose, 40 mg/kg (daily on days 0–4 and 7–10), that retained ultimate therapeutic efficacy yet provided a 2–3 day window post-treatment for imaging early, subtle metabolic changes prior to gross tumor regression. We then used 18F-FDG PET as the gold standard for assessing the effects of sorafenib treatment on tumor metabolism and compared this to results obtained by measurement of tumor size, tumor BLI, and tumor FLI changes. PET imaging showed ~55–60% inhibition of tumor uptake of 18F-FDG as early as days 2 and 3 post-treatment, without noticeable changes in tumor size. For comparison, two FLI probes, BombesinRSense™ 680 (BRS-680) and Transferrin-Vivo™ 750 (TfV-750), were assessed for their potential in metabolic imaging. Metabolically active cancer cells are known to have elevated bombesin and transferrin receptor levels on the surface. In excellent agreement with PET imaging, the BRS-680 imaging showed 40% and 79% inhibition on days 2 and 3, respectively, and the TfV-750 imaging showed 65% inhibition on day 3. In both cases, no significant reduction in tumor volume or BLI signal was observed during the first 3 days of treatment. These results suggest that metabolic FLI has potential preclinical application as an additional method for detecting drug-induced metabolic changes in tumors.
      13. URL :
        https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0182689 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5549732/pdf/pone.0182689.pdf
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @ 14190
      15. Serial :
        13379
      1. Author :
        Tseng, Jen-Chieh; Narayanan, Nara; Ho, Guojie; Groves, Kevin; Delaney, Jeannine; Bao, Bagna; Zhang, Jun; Morin, Jeffrey; Kossodo, Sylvie; Rajopadhye, Milind; Peterson, Jeffrey D.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2017
      5. Publication :
        PloS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        12
      8. Issue :
        8
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Humans; Cell Line, Tumor; Neoplasm Transplantation; Fluorescent Dyes; Antineoplastic Agents; Mice, Transgenic; Dose-Response Relationship, Drug; Colonic Neoplasms; Treatment Outcome; Tumor Burden; Disease Progression; Positron-Emission Tomography; Pet; Radiopharmaceuticals; Fluorodeoxyglucose F18; Molecular Imaging; Niacinamide; Optical Imaging; Phenylurea Compounds; Random Allocation; Receptors, Bombesin; Receptors, Transferrin; G8 Pet/Ct; PET imaging; Ct
      12. Abstract :
        Physical measurement of tumor volume reduction is the most commonly used approach to assess tumor progression and treatment efficacy in mouse tumor models. However, it is relatively insensitive, and often requires long treatment courses to achieve gross physical tumor destruction. As alternatives, several non-invasive imaging methods such as bioluminescence imaging (BLI), fluorescence imaging (FLI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have been developed for more accurate measurement. As tumors have elevated glucose metabolism, 18F-fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) has become a sensitive PET imaging tracer for cancer detection, diagnosis, and efficacy assessment by measuring alterations in glucose metabolism. In particular, the ability of 18F-FDG imaging to detect drug-induced effects on tumor metabolism at a very early phase has dramatically improved the speed of decision-making regarding treatment efficacy. Here we demonstrated an approach with FLI that offers not only comparable performance to PET imaging, but also provides additional benefits, including ease of use, imaging throughput, probe stability, and the potential for multiplex imaging. In this report, we used sorafenib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor clinically approved for cancer therapy, for treatment of a mouse tumor xenograft model. The drug is known to block several key signaling pathways involved in tumor metabolism. We first identified an appropriate sorafenib dose, 40 mg/kg (daily on days 0-4 and 7-10), that retained ultimate therapeutic efficacy yet provided a 2-3 day window post-treatment for imaging early, subtle metabolic changes prior to gross tumor regression. We then used 18F-FDG PET as the gold standard for assessing the effects of sorafenib treatment on tumor metabolism and compared this to results obtained by measurement of tumor size, tumor BLI, and tumor FLI changes. PET imaging showed ~55-60% inhibition of tumor uptake of 18F-FDG as early as days 2 and 3 post-treatment, without noticeable changes in tumor size. For comparison, two FLI probes, BombesinRSense™ 680 (BRS-680) and Transferrin-Vivo™ 750 (TfV-750), were assessed for their potential in metabolic imaging. Metabolically active cancer cells are known to have elevated bombesin and transferrin receptor levels on the surface. In excellent agreement with PET imaging, the BRS-680 imaging showed 40% and 79% inhibition on days 2 and 3, respectively, and the TfV-750 imaging showed 65% inhibition on day 3. In both cases, no significant reduction in tumor volume or BLI signal was observed during the first 3 days of treatment. These results suggest that metabolic FLI has potential preclinical application as an additional method for detecting drug-induced metabolic changes in tumors.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28792505
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @
      15. Serial :
        17160
      1. Author :
        Zeh, Ryan; Sheikh, Saad; Xia, Leilei; Pierce, John; Newton, Andrew; Predina, Jarrod; Cho, Steve; Nasrallah, MacLean; Singhal, Sunil; Dorsey, Jay; Lee, John Y. K.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2017
      5. Publication :
        Plos One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        12
      8. Issue :
        7
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS; IVIS FLI in vivo
      12. Abstract :
        Introduction Fluorescence-guided surgery has emerged as a powerful tool to detect, localize and resect tumors in the operative setting. Our laboratory has pioneered a novel way to administer an FDA-approved near-infrared (NIR) contrast agent to help surgeons with this task. This technique, coined Second Window ICG, exploits the natural permeability of tumor vasculature and its poor clearance to deliver high doses of indocyanine green (ICG) to tumors. This technique differs substantially from established ICG video angiography techniques that visualize ICG within minutes of injection. We hypothesized that Second Window ICG can provide NIR optical contrast with good signal characteristics in intracranial brain tumors over a longer period of time than previously appreciated with ICG video angiography alone. We tested this hypothesis in an intracranial mouse glioblastoma model, and corroborated this in a human clinical trial. Methods Intracranial tumors were established in 20 mice using the U251-Luc-GFP cell line. Successful grafts were confirmed with bioluminescence. Intravenous tail vein injections of 5.0 mg/kg (high dose) or 2.5 mg/kg (low dose) ICG were performed. The Perkin Elmer IVIS Spectrum (closed field) was used to visualize NIR fluorescence signal at seven delayed time points following ICG injection. NIR signals were quantified using LivingImage software. Based on the success of our results, human subjects were recruited to a clinical trial and intravenously injected with high dose 5.0 mg/kg. Imaging was performed with the VisionSense Iridium (open field) during surgery one day after ICG injection. Results In the murine model, the NIR signal-to-background ratio (SBR) in gliomas peaks at one hour after infusion, then plateaus and remains strong and stable for at least 48 hours. Higher dose 5.0 mg/kg improves NIR signal as compared to lower dose at 2.5 mg/kg (SBR = 3.5 vs. 2.8; P = 0.0624). Although early (≤ 6 hrs) visualization of the Second Window ICG accumulation in gliomas is stronger than late (≥24 hrs) visualization (SBR = 3.94 vs. 2.32; p<0.05) there appears to be a long plateau period of stable ICG NIR signal accumulation within tumors in the murine model. We call this long plateau period the “Second Window” of ICG. In glioblastoma patients, the delayed visualization of intratumoral NIR signal was strong (SBR 7.50 ± 0.74), without any significant difference within the 19 to 30 hour visualization window (R2 = 0.019). Conclusion The Second Window ICG technique allows neurosurgeons to deliver NIR optical contrast agent to human glioblastoma patients, thus providing real-time tumor identification in the operating room. This nonspecific tumor accumulation of ICG within the tumor provides strong signal to background contrast, and is not significantly time dependent between 6 hours to 48 hours, providing a broad plateau for stable visualization. This finding suggests that optimal imaging of the “Second Window of ICG” may be within this plateau period, thus providing signal uniformity across subjects.
      13. URL :
        https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0182034 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5524327/pdf/pone.0182034.pdf
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @ 14126
      15. Serial :
        13581
      1. Author :
        Nakano, Tomoyuki; Kanai, Yoshihiko; Amano, Yusuke; Yoshimoto, Taichiro; Matsubara, Daisuke; Shibano, Tomoki; Tamura, Tomoko; Oguni, Sachiko; Katashiba, Shizuka; Ito, Takeshi; Murakami, Yoshinori; Fukayama, Masashi; Murakami, Takashi; Endo, Shunsuke; Niki, Toshiro
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2017
      5. Publication :
        Plos One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        12
      8. Issue :
        8
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS; IVIS BLI in vivo
      12. Abstract :
        Decreased cell-substratum adhesion is crucially involved in metastasis. Previous studies demonstrated that lung cancer with floating cell clusters in histology is more likely to develop metastasis. In the present study, we investigated whether cancer cells in long-term, three-dimensional low attachment cultures acquire high metastatic potential; these cells were then used to examine the mechanisms underlying metastasis. Two KRAS-mutated adenocarcinoma cell lines (A549 and H441) were cultured and selected on ultra-low attachment culture dishes, and the resulting cells were defined as FL (for floating) sublines. Cancer cells were inoculated into NOD/SCID mice via an intracardiac injection, and metastasis was evaluated using luciferase-based imaging and histopathology. In vitro cell growth (in attachment or suspension cultures), migration, and invasion were assayed. A whole genomic analysis was performed to identify key molecular alterations in FL sublines. Upon detachment on low-binding dishes, parental cells initially formed rounded spheroids with limited growth activity. However, over time in cultures, cells gradually formed smaller spheroids that grew slowly, and, after 3–4 months, we obtained FL sublines that regained prominent growth potential in suspension cultures. On ordinary dishes, FL cells reattached and exhibited a more spindle-shaped morphology than parental cells. No marked differences were observed in cell growth with attachment, migration, or invasion between FL sublines and parental cell lines; however, FL cells exhibited markedly increased growth potential under suspended conditions in vitro and stronger metastatic abilities in vivo. A genomic analysis identified epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and c-Myc amplification in A549-FL and H441-FL cells, respectively, as candidate mechanisms for metastasis. The growth potential of FL cells was markedly inhibited by lentiviral ZEB1 knockdown in A549-FL cells and by the inhibition of c-Myc through lentiviral knockdown or the pharmacological inhibitor JQ1 in H441-FL cells. Long-term three-dimensional low attachment cultures may become a useful method for investigating the mechanisms underlying metastasis mediated by decreased cell-substratum adhesion.
      13. URL :
        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5546599/pdf/pone.0181342.pdf
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @ 14185
      15. Serial :
        13862
      1. Author :
        Quang, Tri T.; Kim, Hye-Yeong; Bao, Forrest Sheng; Papay, Francis A.; Edwards, W. Barry; Liu, Yang
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2017
      5. Publication :
        Plos One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        12
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        FMT; PET; mice
      12. Abstract :
        Fluorescence imaging is a powerful technique with diverse applications in intraoperative settings. Visualization of three dimensional (3D) structures and depth assessment of lesions, however, are oftentimes limited in planar fluorescence imaging systems. In this study, a novel Fluorescence Imaging Topography Scanning (FITS) system has been developed, which offers color reflectance imaging, fluorescence imaging and surface topography scanning capabilities. The system is compact and portable, and thus suitable for deployment in the operating room without disturbing the surgical flow. For system performance, parameters including near infrared fluorescence detection limit, contrast transfer functions and topography depth resolution were characterized. The developed system was tested in chicken tissues ex vivo with simulated tumors for intraoperative imaging. We subsequently conducted in vivo multimodal imaging of sentinel lymph nodes in mice using FITS and PET/CT. The PET/CT/optical multimodal images were co-registered and conveniently presented to users to guide surgeries. Our results show that the developed system can facilitate multimodal intraoperative imaging.
      13. URL :
        https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0174928 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5402944/pdf/pone.0174928.pdf
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @ 13759
      15. Serial :
        13383
      1. Author :
        Chan, Alex H. P.; Tan, Richard P.; Michael, Praveesuda L.; Lee, Bob S. L.; Vanags, Laura Z.; Ng, Martin K. C.; Bursill, Christina A.; Wise, Steven G.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2017
      5. Publication :
        Plos One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        12
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS; IVIS BLI in vivo
      12. Abstract :
        Current animal models for the evaluation of synthetic grafts are lacking many of the molecular tools and transgenic studies available to other branches of biology. A mouse model of vascular grafting would allow for the study of molecular mechanisms of graft failure, including in the context of clinically relevant disease states. In this study, we comprehensively characterise a sutureless grafting model which facilitates the evaluation of synthetic grafts in the mouse carotid artery. Using conduits electrospun from polycaprolactone (PCL) we show the gradual development of a significant neointima within 28 days, found to be greatest at the anastomoses. Histological analysis showed temporal increases in smooth muscle cell and collagen content within the neointima, demonstrating its maturation. Endothelialisation of the PCL grafts, assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis and CD31 staining, was near complete within 28 days, together replicating two critical aspects of graft performance. To further demonstrate the potential of this mouse model, we used longitudinal non-invasive tracking of bone-marrow mononuclear cells from a transgenic mouse strain with a dual reporter construct encoding both luciferase and green fluorescent protein (GFP). This enabled characterisation of mononuclear cell homing and engraftment to PCL using bioluminescence imaging and histological staining over time (7, 14 and 28 days). We observed peak luminescence at 7 days post-graft implantation that persisted until sacrifice at 28 days. Collectively, we have established and characterised a high-throughput model of grafting that allows for the evaluation of key clinical drivers of graft performance.
      13. URL :
        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5371373/pdf/pone.0174773.pdf
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @ 13597
      15. Serial :
        14170
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All