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      1. Author :
        Cronin, M.; Akin, A. R.; Collins, S. A.; Meganck, J.; Kim, J. B.; Baban, C. K.; Joyce, S. A.; van Dam, G. M.; Zhang, N.; van Sinderen, D.; O'Sullivan, G. C.; Kasahara, N.; Gahan, C. G.; Francis, K. P.; Tangney, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        7
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        HCT-116-luc2, IVIS, Bioware, HCT116-luc2, Administration, Oral; Animals; Bacteria/*genetics; Cell Line, Tumor; Female; Genes, Reporter/genetics; Genetic Engineering; Glioblastoma/*microbiology/pathology/radiography; Humans; Imaging, Three-Dimensional; Luminescent Measurements/*methods; Lung Neoplasms/*microbiology/pathology/radiography; Mice; Molecular Imaging/*methods; X-Ray Microtomography
      12. Abstract :
        The ability to track microbes in real time in vivo is of enormous value for preclinical investigations in infectious disease or gene therapy research. Bacteria present an attractive class of vector for cancer therapy, possessing a natural ability to grow preferentially within tumours following systemic administration. Bioluminescent Imaging (BLI) represents a powerful tool for use with bacteria engineered to express reporter genes such as lux. BLI is traditionally used as a 2D modality resulting in images that are limited in their ability to anatomically locate cell populations. Use of 3D diffuse optical tomography can localize the signals but still need to be combined with an anatomical imaging modality like micro-Computed Tomography (muCT) for interpretation.In this study, the non-pathogenic commensal bacteria E. coli K-12 MG1655 and Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003, or Salmonella Typhimurium SL7207 each expressing the luxABCDE operon were intravenously (i.v.) administered to mice bearing subcutaneous (s.c) FLuc-expressing xenograft tumours. Bacterial lux signal was detected specifically in tumours of mice post i.v.-administration and bioluminescence correlated with the numbers of bacteria recovered from tissue. Through whole body imaging for both lux and FLuc, bacteria and tumour cells were co-localised. 3D BLI and muCT image analysis revealed a pattern of multiple clusters of bacteria within tumours. Investigation of spatial resolution of 3D optical imaging was supported by ex vivo histological analyses. In vivo imaging of orally-administered commensal bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) was also achieved using 3D BLI. This study demonstrates for the first time the potential to simultaneously image multiple BLI reporter genes three dimensionally in vivo using approaches that provide unique information on spatial locations.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22295120
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10496
      1. Author :
        Guo, K.; Tang, J. P.; Jie, L.; Al-Aidaroos, A. Q.; Hong, C. W.; Tan, C. P.; Park, J. E.; Varghese, L.; Feng, Z.; Zhou, J.; Chng, W. J.; Zeng, Q.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Oncotarget
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        3
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        HCT-116-luc2, IVIS, Bioware, HCT116-luc2, Animals; Antibodies, Monoclonal/*immunology; Antibody-Dependent Cell Cytotoxicity/immunology; Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/drug therapy; Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/drug therapy; Cell Line, Tumor; Colorectal Neoplasms/drug therapy; Humans; Immediate-Early Proteins/*immunology; Killer Cells, Natural/*immunology; Lymphocyte Activation/immunology; Melanoma/drug therapy; Mice; Mice, Nude; Mice, SCID; Molecular Targeted Therapy/*methods; Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases/*immunology; Recombinant Fusion Proteins/immunology/pharmacology/therapeutic use
      12. Abstract :
        Antibodies are considered as 'magic bullets' because of their high specificity. It is believed that antibodies are too large to routinely enter the cytosol, thus antibody therapeutic approach has been limited to extracellular or secreted proteins expressed by cancer cells. However, many oncogenic proteins are localized within the cell. To explore the possibility of antibody therapies against intracellular targets, we generated a chimeric antibody targeting the intracellular PRL-3 oncoprotein to assess its antitumor activities in mice. Remarkably, we observed that the PRL-3 chimeric antibody could efficiently and specifically reduce the formation of PRL-3 expressing metastatic tumors. We further found that natural killer (NK) cells were important in mediating the therapeutic effect, which was only observed in a nude mouse model (T-cell deficient), but not in a Severe Combined Immunodeficiency' (scid ) mouse model (B- and T-cell deficient), indicating the anticancer effect also depends on host B-cell activity. Our study involving 377 nude and scid mice suggest that antibodies targeting intracellular proteins can be developed to treat cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22374986
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10497
      1. Author :
        Phillips, W. T.; Goins, B.; Bao, A.; Vargas, D.; Guttierez, J. E.; Trevino, A.; Miller, J. R.; Henry, J.; Zuniga, R.; Vecil, G.; Brenner, A. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Neuro Oncol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        14
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        416-25
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        U-87 MG-luc2, U-87-MG-luc2, Glioma, Bioware, IVIS, Animals; Brachytherapy/*methods; Brain Neoplasms/pathology/*radiotherapy; Convection; Glioblastoma/pathology/*radiotherapy; Glioma/pathology/*radiotherapy; Liposomes; Nanoparticles/therapeutic use; Radioisotopes/*therapeutic use; Rats; Rhenium/*therapeutic use; Tumor Burden; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Although external beam radiation is an essential component to the current standard treatment of primary brain tumors, its application is limited by toxicity at doses more than 80 Gy. Recent studies have suggested that brachytherapy with liposomally encapsulated radionuclides may be of benefit, and we have reported methods to markedly increase the specific activity of rhenium-186 ((186)Re)-liposomes. To better characterize the potential delivery, toxicity, and efficacy of the highly specific activity of (186)Re-liposomes, we evaluated their intracranial application by convection-enhanced delivery in an orthotopic U87 glioma rat model. After establishing an optimal volume of 25 microL, we observed focal activity confined to the site of injection over a 96-hour period. Doses of up to 1850 Gy were administered without overt clinical or microscopic evidence of toxicity. Animals treated with (186)Re-liposomes had a median survival of 126 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 78.4-173 days), compared with 49 days (95% CI, 44-53 days) for controls. Log-rank analysis between these 2 groups was highly significant (P = .0013) and was even higher when 100 Gy was used as a cutoff (P < .0001). Noninvasive luciferase imaging as a surrogate for tumor volume showed a statistically significant separation in bioluminescence by 11 days after 100 Gy or less treatment between the experimental group and the control animals (chi(2)[1, N= 19] = 4.8; P = .029). MRI also supported this difference in tumor size. Duplication of tumor volume differences and survival benefit was possible in a more invasive U251 orthotopic model, with clear separation in bioluminescence at 6 days after treatment (chi(2)[1, N= 9] = 4.7; P = .029); median survival in treated animals was not reached at 120 days because lack of mortality, and log-rank analysis of survival was highly significant (P = .0057). Analysis of tumors by histology revealed minimal areas of necrosis and gliosis. These results support the potential efficacy of the highly specific activity of brachytherapy by (186)Re-liposomes convection-enhanced delivery in glioma.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22427110
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10500
      1. Author :
        Oashi, K.; Furukawa, H.; Nishihara, H.; Ozaki, M.; Oyama, A.; Funayama, E.; Hayashi, T.; Kuge, Y.; Yamamoto, Y.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Invest Dermatol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        B16-F10-luc2, Melanoma, B16F10-luc2, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        In-transit metastasis (ITM) is a unique manifestation of intralymphatic tumor dissemination, characterized by the presence of melanoma cells between the primary lesion and the draining regional lymph node basin that is clinically associated with poor prognosis. In this study, we aimed to establish an experimental animal model of melanoma ITM, as research progress in this field has been hampered by a lack of suitable experimental models. We reproduced melanoma ITM in a mouse hind limb by transplanting melanoma cells into the footpad of a mouse with lymphedema (LE). The tumor cells at the ITM site were highly proliferative, and mice with ITMs were more likely than control mice to develop distant lymph node and lung metastases. Peritumoral lymphatic vessels and tumor-associated blood vessels were increased in the primary tumor site of the LE mice. Our established ITM melanoma mouse model enabled us to clarify the molecular determinants and pathophysiology of ITM. This ITM model is also comparable to the unfavorable clinical behavior of melanoma ITM in humans and, moreover, underlined the importance of lymphangiogenic factors in the tumor dissemination through the lymphatic system.Journal of Investigative Dermatology advance online publication, 6 September 2012; doi:10.1038/jid.2012.274.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22951727
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 10
      15. Serial :
        10501
      1. Author :
        Pesnel, S.; Pillon, A.; Creancier, L.; Lerondel, S.; Le Pape, A.; Recher, C.; Demur, C.; Guilbaud, N.; Kruczynski, A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        7
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        e30690
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        HCT-116-luc2, HCT116-luc2, IVIS, Animals; Antibodies, Monoclonal/administration & dosage/*immunology; Antigens, CD45/metabolism; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic/pathology; Disease Models, Animal; Flow Cytometry; Fluorescent Dyes/*metabolism; Humans; Imaging, Three-Dimensional/*methods; Injections, Intravenous; Leukemia/*diagnosis/*pathology; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/pathology; Longevity; Luminescent Measurements; Mice; Mice, SCID; Reproducibility of Results; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared/*methods
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: The assessment of anticancer agents to treat leukemia needs to have animal models closer to the human pathology such as implantation in immunodeficient mice of leukemic cells from patient samples. A sensitive and early detection of tumor cells in these orthotopic models is a prerequisite for monitoring engraftment of leukemic cells and their dissemination in mice. Therefore, we developed a fluorescent antibody based strategy to detect leukemic foci in mice bearing patient-derived leukemic cells using fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI) to determine when to start treatments with novel antitumor agents. METHODS: Two mAbs against the CD44 human myeloid marker or the CD45 human leukocyte marker were labeled with Alexa Fluor 750 and administered to leukemia-bearing mice after having verified the immunoreactivity in vitro. Bioluminescent leukemic cells (HL60-Luc) were used to compare the colocalization of the fluorescent mAb with these cells. The impact of the labeled antibodies on disease progression was further determined. Finally, the fluorescent hCD45 mAb was tested in mice engrafted with human leukemic cells. RESULTS: The probe labeling did not modify the immunoreactivity of the mAbs. There was a satisfactory correlation between bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and FRI and low doses of mAb were sufficient to detect leukemic foci. However, anti-hCD44 mAb had a strong impact on the tumor proliferation contrary to anti-hCD45 mAb. The use of anti-hCD45 mAb allowed the detection of leukemic patient cells engrafted onto NOD/SCID mice. CONCLUSIONS: A mAb labeled with a near infrared fluorochrome is useful to detect leukemic foci in disseminated models provided that its potential impact on tumor proliferation has been thoroughly documented.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22303450
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10503
      1. Author :
        Welti, J. C.; Powles, T.; Foo, S.; Gourlaouen, M.; Preece, N.; Foster, J.; Frentzas, S.; Bird, D.; Sharpe, K.; van Weverwijk, A.; Robertson, D.; Soffe, J.; Erler, J. T.; Pili, R.; Springer, C. J.; Mather, S. J.; Reynolds, A. R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Angiogenesis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        15
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        623-41
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        4T1-luc2, 4T1, Bioware, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        Sunitinib is a potent and clinically approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor that can suppress tumour growth by inhibiting angiogenesis. However, conflicting data exist regarding the effects of this drug on the growth of metastases in preclinical models. Here we use 4T1 and RENCA tumour cells, which both form lung metastases in Balb/c mice, to re-address the effects of sunitinib on the progression of metastatic disease in mice. We show that treatment of mice with sunitinib prior to intravenous injection of tumour cells can promote the seeding and growth of 4T1 lung metastases, but not RENCA lung metastases, showing that this effect is cell line dependent. However, increased metastasis occurred only upon administration of a very high sunitinib dose, but not when lower, clinically relevant doses were used. Mechanistically, high dose sunitinib led to a pericyte depletion effect in the lung vasculature that correlated with increased seeding of metastasis. By administering sunitinib to mice after intravenous injection of tumour cells, we demonstrate that while sunitinib does not inhibit the growth of 4T1 lung tumour nodules, it does block the growth of RENCA lung tumour nodules. This contrasting response was correlated with increased myeloid cell recruitment and persistent vascularisation in 4T1 tumours, whereas RENCA tumours recruited less myeloid cells and were more profoundly devascularised upon sunitinib treatment. Finally, we show that progression of 4T1 tumours in sunitinib treated mice results in increased hypoxia and increased glucose metabolism in these tumours and that this is associated with a poor outcome. Taken together, these data suggest that the effects of sunitinib on tumour progression are dose-dependent and tumour model-dependent. These findings have relevance for understanding how anti-angiogenic agents may influence disease progression when used in the adjuvant or metastatic setting in cancer patients.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22843200
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 10
      15. Serial :
        10504
      1. Author :
        Yigit, M. V.; Ghosh, S. K.; Kumar, M.; Petkova, V.; Kavishwar, A.; Moore, A.; Medarova, Z.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Oncogene
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-luc-D3H2Ln, D3H2Ln, Bioware, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        Metastases, and not the primary tumor from which they originate, are the main reason for mortality from carcinoma. Although the molecular mechanisms behind metastasis are poorly understood, it is clear that epigenetic dysregulation at the level of microRNA expression is a key characteristic of the metastatic process that can be exploited for therapy. Here, we describe an miRNA-targeted therapeutic approach for the prevention and arrest of lymph node metastasis. Therapy relies on the inhibition of the pro-metastatic microRNA-10b. It is delivered to primary and lymph node metastatic tumor cells using an imaging-capable nanodrug that is designed to specifically home to these tissues. Treatment of invasive human breast tumor cells (MDA-MB-231) with the nanodrug in vitro downregulates miR-10b and abolishes the invasion and migration of the tumor cells. After intravenous delivery to mice bearing orthotopic MDA-MB-231-luc-D3H2LN tumors, the nanodrug accumulates in the primary tumor and lymph nodes. When treatment is initiated before metastasis to lymph nodes, metastasis is prevented. Treatment after the formation of lymph node metastases arrests the metastatic process without a concomitant effect on primary tumor growth raising the possibility of a context-dependent variation in miR-10b breast oncogenesis.Oncogene advance online publication, 14 May 2012; doi:10.1038/onc.2012.173.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22580603
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 9
      15. Serial :
        10505
      1. Author :
        Domanska, U. M.; Timmer-Bosscha, H.; Nagengast, W. B.; Oude Munnink, T. H.; Kruizinga, R. C.; Ananias, H. J.; Kliphuis, N. M.; Huls, G.; De Vries, E. G.; de Jong, I. J.; Walenkamp, A. M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Neoplasia
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        14
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        709-18
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        PC-3-luc2, Prostate Cancer, Bioware, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        Several in vitro and in vivo models have revealed the key role of CXCR4/CXCL12 axis in tumor-stroma interactions. Stromal cells present in the tumor microenvironment express high levels of CXCL12 protein, directly stimulating proliferation and migration of CXCR4-expressing cancer cells. This specific prosurvival influence of stromal cells on tumor cells is thought to protect them from cytotoxic chemotherapy and is postulated as a possible explanation for the minimal residual disease in hematological and solid cancers. Therefore, CXCR4/CXCL12 signaling is an attractive therapeutic target in cancer, as proven in preclinical leukemia mouse models, where CXCR4 inhibition sensitized cancer cells to conventional chemotherapy. This study investigates whether inhibition of CXCR4 with the specific inhibitor AMD3100 sensitizes human prostate cancer cells to docetaxel. We showed that both mouse and human stromal cell lines have a protective effect on PC3-luc cells by promoting their survival after chemotherapy. Furthermore, we demonstrated that AMD3100 sensitizes PC3-luc cells to docetaxel. In a subcutaneous xenograft mouse model of human prostate carcinoma, we showed that a combination of docetaxel and AMD3100 exerts increased antitumor effect compared with docetaxel alone. We concluded that CXCR4 inhibition chemosensitizes prostate cancer cells, both in vitro and in vivo. To explore the relevance of these findings, we analyzed CXCR4 expression levels in human prostate cancer samples. We found that cancer cells present in bone metastatic lesions express higher CXCR4 levels relative to the cells present in primary tumors and lymph node metastatic lesions. These findings underscore the potential of CXCR4 inhibitors as chemosensitizing agents.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22952424
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10507
      1. Author :
        Leong, H. S.; Lizardo, M. M.; Ablack, A.; McPherson, V. A.; Wandless, T. J.; Chambers, A. F.; Lewis, J. D.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        7
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-luc-D3H2Ln, D3H2Ln, IVIS, Breast cancer, Bioware, Animals; Birds/embryology; Breast Neoplasms/*metabolism; Cadherins/*metabolism; Cell Line, Tumor; Diagnostic Imaging; Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition/drug effects; Female; Humans; Microscopy, Confocal; Microscopy, Fluorescence; Morpholines/pharmacokinetics/pharmacology; Transplantation, Heterologous; Vimentin/metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        The analysis of dynamic events in the tumor microenvironment during cancer progression is limited by the complexity of current in vivo imaging models. This is coupled with an inability to rapidly modulate and visualize protein activity in real time and to understand the consequence of these perturbations in vivo. We developed an intravital imaging approach that allows the rapid induction and subsequent depletion of target protein levels within human cancer xenografts while assessing the impact on cell behavior and morphology in real time. A conditionally stabilized fluorescent E-cadherin chimera was expressed in metastatic breast cancer cells, and the impact of E-cadherin induction and depletion was visualized using real-time confocal microscopy in a xenograft avian embryo model. We demonstrate the assessment of protein localization, cell morphology and migration in cells undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal and mesenchymal-epithelial transitions in breast tumors. This technique allows for precise control over protein activity in vivo while permitting the temporal analysis of dynamic biophysical parameters.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22276156
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10508
      1. Author :
        Vintonenko, N.; Jais, J. P.; Kassis, N.; Abdelkarim, M.; Perret, G. Y.; Lecouvey, M.; Crepin, M.; Di Benedetto, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Mol Pharmacol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        82
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-luc-D3H2Ln, D3H2Ln, IVIS, Breast cancer, Bioware
      12. Abstract :
        Statins and bisphosphonates are two distinct classes of isoprenoid pathway inhibitors targeting downstream enzyme to HMG-CoA reductase (upstream enzyme) and farnesyl-pyrophosphate synthase, respectively. Here, we studied fluvastatin (Fluva) and zoledronate (Zol), representative molecules of each class, respectively. In vivo metastatic potentials of both molecules were assessed. For the first time, we observed a significant reduction in progression of established metastases with Fluva treatment. Treatment with both Zol at 100 mug/kg and Fluva at 15 mg/kg inhibited 80% of the metastasis bioluminescence signal and increased survival of mice. The Zol and Fluva transcriptomic profiles of treated MDA-MB-231 cells revealed analogous patterns of affected genes, but each of them reached with different kinetics. The observable changes in gene expression started after 24 h for Fluva IC(50 72 h) and only after 48 h for Zol IC(50 72 h). To obtain early changes in gene expression of Zol-treated cells, a 3 times higher dose of Zol IC(50 72 h) had to be applied. Combining Fluva and Zol in vivo showed no synergy, but a benefit of several days in survival of mice. This study demonstrated that Zol or Fluva is of potential clinical use for the treatment of established metastasis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22723339
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10509
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