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      1. Author :
        Smith, B. R.; Kempen, P.; Bouley, D.; Xu, A.; Liu, Z.; Melosh, N.; Dai, H.; Sinclair, R.; Gambhir, S. S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Nano Lett
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        12
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense, Animals; *Disease Models, Animal; Ear Neoplasms/*blood supply/pathology; Humans; Mice; Microscopy, Fluorescence; Nanoparticles/*chemistry; *Nanotechnology; Nanotubes, Carbon/chemistry; Neoplasms, Experimental/*blood supply/pathology; Particle Size; Quantum Dots; Surface Properties
      12. Abstract :
        Delivery is one of the most critical obstacles confronting nanoparticle use in cancer diagnosis and therapy. For most oncological applications, nanoparticles must extravasate in order to reach tumor cells and perform their designated task. However, little understanding exists regarding the effect of nanoparticle shape on extravasation. Herein we use real-time intravital microscopic imaging to meticulously examine how two different nanoparticles behave across three different murine tumor models. The study quantitatively demonstrates that high-aspect ratio single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) display extravasational behavior surprisingly different from, and counterintuitive to, spherical nanoparticles although the nanoparticles have similar surface coatings, area, and charge. This work quantitatively indicates that nanoscale extravasational competence is highly dependent on nanoparticle geometry and is heterogeneous.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22650417
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 9
      15. Serial :
        10439
      1. Author :
        Hsieh, C. H.; Chang, H. T.; Shen, W. C.; Shyu, W. C.; Liu, R. S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Mol Imaging Biol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        14
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MMPSense, IVIS, Animals; Cell Hypoxia; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Movement; Enzyme Activation; Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases/metabolism; Gene Knockdown Techniques; Glioblastoma/*enzymology/*pathology; Humans; JNK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism; Matrix Metalloproteinase 9/metabolism; Mice; Mice, SCID; Molecular Imaging/*methods; NADPH Oxidase/*metabolism; NF-kappa B/metabolism; Neoplasm Invasiveness; Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism; Tumor Microenvironment; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        PURPOSE: We determined the impact of the cycling hypoxia tumor microenvironment on tumor cell invasion and infiltration in U87 human glioblastoma cells and investigated the underlying mechanisms using molecular bio-techniques and imaging. PROCEDURES: The invasive phenotype of U87 cells and xenografts exposed to experimentally imposed cycling hypoxic stress in vitro and in vivo was determined by the matrigel invasion assay in vitro and dual optical reporter gene imaging in vivo. RNAi-knockdown technology was utilized to study the role of the NADPH oxidase subunit 4 (Nox4) on cycling hypoxia-mediated tumor invasion. RESULTS: Cycling hypoxic stress significantly promoted tumor invasion in vitro and in vivo. However, Nox4 knockdown inhibited this effect. Nox4-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) are required for cycling hypoxia-induced invasive potential in U87 cells through the activation of NF-kappaB- and ERK-mediated stimulation of MMP-9. CONCLUSIONS: Cycling hypoxia-induced ROS via Nox4 should be considered for therapeutic targeting of tumor cell invasion and infiltration in glioblastoma.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21870211
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 5
      15. Serial :
        10461
      1. Author :
        Chen, Y.; Jacamo, R.; Shi, Y. X.; Wang, R. Y.; Battula, V. L.; Konoplev, S.; Strunk, D.; Hofmann, N. A.; Reinisch, A.; Konopleva, M.; Andreeff, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Blood
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        119
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, IVIS, Animals; Bone Marrow Cells/*cytology/metabolism/physiology; Bone Marrow Transplantation/*methods/physiology; Cells, Cultured; Cellular Microenvironment/genetics/*physiology; Hematopoiesis, Extramedullary/genetics/*physiology; Humans; Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/genetics/metabolism; Interleukin Receptor Common gamma Subunit/genetics; Mice; Mice, Inbred NOD; Mice, SCID; Mice, Transgenic; Models, Animal; Osteogenesis/genetics/physiology; Species Specificity; *Transplantation, Heterotopic
      12. Abstract :
        The interactions between hematopoietic cells and the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment play a critical role in normal and malignant hematopoiesis and drug resistance. These interactions within the BM niche are unique and could be important for developing new therapies. Here, we describe the development of extramedullary bone and bone marrow using human mesenchymal stromal cells and endothelial colony-forming cells implanted subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice. We demonstrate the engraftment of human normal and leukemic cells engraft into the human extramedullary bone marrow. When normal hematopoietic cells are engrafted into the model, only discrete areas of the BM are hypoxic, whereas leukemia engraftment results in widespread severe hypoxia, just as recently reported by us in human leukemias. Importantly, the hematopoietic cell engraftment could be altered by genetical manipulation of the bone marrow microenvironment: Extramedullary bone marrow in which hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha was knocked down in mesenchymal stromal cells by lentiviral transfer of short hairpin RNA showed significant reduction (50% +/- 6%; P = .0006) in human leukemic cell engraftment. These results highlight the potential of a novel in vivo model of human BM microenvironment that can be genetically modified. The model could be useful for the study of leukemia biology and for the development of novel therapeutic modalities aimed at modifying the hematopoietic microenvironment.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22490334
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10465
      1. Author :
        Ale, A.; Ermolayev, V.; Herzog, E.; Cohrs, C.; de Angelis, M. H.; Ntziachristos, V.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Nat Methods
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        9
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, Animals; Bone Remodeling; Disease Models, Animal; Equipment Design; Female; Fluorescence; Head and Neck Neoplasms/pathology/radiography; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted/*methods; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/radiography; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental/pathology/radiography; Mice; Osteogenesis Imperfecta/pathology/radiography; Tomography, Optical/*methods; Tomography, X-Ray Computed/*methods
      12. Abstract :
        The development of hybrid optical tomography methods to improve imaging performance has been suggested over a decade ago and has been experimentally demonstrated in animals and humans. Here we examined in vivo performance of a camera-based hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) system for 360 degrees imaging combined with X-ray computed tomography (XCT). Offering an accurately co-registered, information-rich hybrid data set, FMT-XCT has new imaging possibilities compared to stand-alone FMT and XCT. We applied FMT-XCT to a subcutaneous 4T1 tumor mouse model, an Aga2 osteogenesis imperfecta model and a Kras lung cancer mouse model, using XCT information during FMT inversion. We validated in vivo imaging results against post-mortem planar fluorescence images of cryoslices and histology data. Besides offering concurrent anatomical and functional information, FMT-XCT resulted in the most accurate FMT performance to date. These findings indicate that addition of FMT optics into the XCT gantry may be a potent upgrade for small-animal XCT systems.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22561987
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 12
      15. Serial :
        10468
      1. Author :
        Derwall, M.; Malhotra, R.; Lai, C. S.; Beppu, Y.; Aikawa, E.; Seehra, J. S.; Zapol, W. M.; Bloch, K. D.; Yu, P. B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        32
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, Animals; Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology; Antioxidants/pharmacology; Atherosclerosis/etiology/genetics/metabolism/pathology/*prevention & control; Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptors, Type I/metabolism; Bone Morphogenetic Proteins/*antagonists & inhibitors/metabolism; Cardiovascular Agents/*pharmacology; Cholesterol, LDL/blood; Diet, High-Fat; Disease Models, Animal; Endothelial Cells/drug effects/metabolism; Fatty Liver/etiology/metabolism/prevention & control; Female; Hep G2 Cells; Humans; Lipoproteins, LDL/metabolism; Liver/drug effects/metabolism; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; Pyrazoles/*pharmacology; Pyrimidines/*pharmacology; Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism; Receptors, LDL/deficiency/genetics; Recombinant Fusion Proteins/metabolism; Signal Transduction/*drug effects; Time Factors; Vascular Calcification/etiology/genetics/metabolism/pathology/*prevention &; control
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVE: The expression of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) is enhanced in human atherosclerotic and calcific vascular lesions. Although genetic gain- and loss-of-function experiments in mice have supported a causal role of BMP signaling in atherosclerosis and vascular calcification, it remains uncertain whether BMP signaling might be targeted pharmacologically to ameliorate both of these processes. METHODS AND RESULTS: We tested the impact of pharmacological BMP inhibition on atherosclerosis and calcification in LDL receptor-deficient (LDLR-/-) mice. LDLR-/- mice fed a high-fat diet developed abundant vascular calcification within 20 weeks. Prolonged treatment of LDLR-/- mice with the small molecule BMP inhibitor LDN-193189 was well-tolerated and potently inhibited development of atheroma, as well as associated vascular inflammation, osteogenic activity, and calcification. Administration of recombinant BMP antagonist ALK3-Fc replicated the antiatherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory effects of LDN-193189. Treatment of human aortic endothelial cells with LDN-193189 or ALK3-Fc abrogated the production of reactive oxygen species induced by oxidized LDL, a known early event in atherogenesis. Unexpectedly, treatment of mice with LDN-193189 lowered LDL serum cholesterol by 35% and markedly decreased hepatosteatosis without inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase activity. Treatment with BMP2 increased, whereas LDN-193189 or ALK3-Fc inhibited apolipoprotein B100 secretion in HepG2 cells, suggesting that BMP signaling contributes to the regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis. CONCLUSION: These results definitively implicate BMP signaling in atherosclerosis and calcification, while uncovering a previously unidentified role for BMP signaling in LDL cholesterol metabolism. BMP inhibition may be helpful in the treatment of atherosclerosis and associated vascular calcification.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22223731
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 5
      15. Serial :
        10469
      1. Author :
        Sabbagh, Y.; Graciolli, F. G.; O'Brien, S.; Tang, W.; dos Reis, L. M.; Ryan, S.; Phillips, L.; Boulanger, J.; Song, W.; Bracken, C.; Liu, S.; Ledbetter, S.; Dechow, P.; Canziani, M. E.; Carvalho, A. B.; Jorgetti, V.; Moyses, R. M.; Schiavi, S. C.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Bone Miner Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        27
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, Animals; Biopsy; Bone Remodeling; Bone and Bones/metabolism/pathology; Calcification, Physiologic; Cardiovascular Abnormalities/blood/complications/pathology/physiopathology; *Disease Progression; Female; Gene Expression Profiling; Gene Expression Regulation; Glycoproteins/metabolism; Humans; Kidney Failure, Chronic/blood/complications/pathology/physiopathology; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Middle Aged; Mutation/genetics; Osteoclasts/metabolism/pathology; Osteocytes/*metabolism/*pathology; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/genetics; Renal Osteodystrophy/blood/*metabolism/*pathology/physiopathology; Vascular Calcification; *Wnt Signaling Pathway/genetics
      12. Abstract :
        Chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is defined by abnormalities in mineral and hormone metabolism, bone histomorphometric changes, and/or the presence of soft-tissue calcification. Emerging evidence suggests that features of CKD-MBD may occur early in disease progression and are associated with changes in osteocyte function. To identify early changes in bone, we utilized the jck mouse, a genetic model of polycystic kidney disease that exhibits progressive renal disease. At 6 weeks of age, jck mice have normal renal function and no evidence of bone disease but exhibit continual decline in renal function and death by 20 weeks of age, when approximately 40% to 60% of them have vascular calcification. Temporal changes in serum parameters were identified in jck relative to wild-type mice from 6 through 18 weeks of age and were subsequently shown to largely mirror serum changes commonly associated with clinical CKD-MBD. Bone histomorphometry revealed progressive changes associated with increased osteoclast activity and elevated bone formation relative to wild-type mice. To capture the early molecular and cellular events in the progression of CKD-MBD we examined cell-specific pathways associated with bone remodeling at the protein and/or gene expression level. Importantly, a steady increase in the number of cells expressing phosphor-Ser33/37-beta-catenin was observed both in mouse and human bones. Overall repression of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling within osteocytes occurred in conjunction with increased expression of Wnt antagonists (SOST and sFRP4) and genes associated with osteoclast activity, including receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL). The resulting increase in the RANKL/osteoprotegerin (OPG) ratio correlated with increased osteoclast activity. In late-stage disease, an apparent repression of genes associated with osteoblast function was observed. These data confirm that jck mice develop progressive biochemical changes in CKD-MBD and suggest that repression of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of renal osteodystrophy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22492547
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 10
      15. Serial :
        10475
      1. Author :
        van der Horst, G.; van der Pluijm, G.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Future Oncol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        8
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, Animals; Bone Neoplasms/*diagnosis/*secondary; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Disease Models, Animal; Disease Progression; Humans; Molecular Imaging/methods; Neoplasm Metastasis/diagnosis
      12. Abstract :
        Bone metastasis is a complex process that ultimately leads to devastating metastatic bone disease. It is therefore of key interest to unravel the mechanisms underlying the multistep process of skeletal metastasis and cancer-induced bone disease, and to develop better treatment and management of patients with this devastating disease. Fortunately, novel technologies are rapidly emerging that allow real-time imaging of molecules, pathogenic processes, drug delivery and drug response in preclinical in vivo models. The outcome of these experimental studies will facilitate clinical cancer research by improving the detection of cancer cell invasion, metastasis and therapy response.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22515445
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 16
      15. Serial :
        10478
      1. Author :
        Liao, A. H.; Li, Y. K.; Lee, W. J.; Wu, M. F.; Liu, H. L.; Kuo, M. L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Ultrasound Med Biol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        38
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        4T1-luc2, IVIS, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        The application of drug-loaded microbubbles (MBs) in combination with ultrasound (US), which results in an increase in capillary permeability at the site of US-sonication-induced MB destruction, may be an efficient method of localized drug delivery. This study investigated the mechanism underlying the US-mediated release of luciferin-loaded MBs through the blood vessels to targeted cells using an in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) system. The luciferin-loaded MBs comprised an albumin shell with a diameter of 1234 +/- 394 nm (mean +/- SD) and contained 2.48 x 10(9) bubbles/mL; within each MB, the concentration of encapsulated luciferin was 1.48 x 10(-)(1)(0) mg/bubble. The loading efficiency of luciferin in MBs was only about 19.8%, while maintaining both the bioluminescence and acoustic properties. In vitro and in vivo BLI experiments were performed to evaluate the US-mediated release of luciferin-loaded MBs. For in vitro results, the increase in light emission of luciferin-loaded albumin-shelled MBs after destruction via US sonication (6.24 +/- 0.72 x 10(7) photons/s) was significantly higher than that in the luciferin-loaded albumin-shelled MBs (3.11 +/- 0.33 x 10(7) photons/s) (p < 0.05). The efficiency of the US-mediated release of luciferin-loaded MBs in 4T1-luc2 tumor-bearing mice was also estimated. The signal intensity of the tumor with US destruction at 3 W/cm(2) for 30 s was significantly higher than without US destruction at 3 (p = 0.025), 5 (p = 0.013), 7 (p = 0.012) and 10 (p = 0.032) min after injecting luciferin-loaded albumin-shelled MBs. The delivery efficiency was, thus, improved with US-mediated release, allowing reduction of the total injection dose of luciferin.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22929655
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 8
      15. Serial :
        10481
      1. Author :
        von Schwarzenberg, K.; Wiedmann, R. M.; Oak, P.; Schulz, S.; Zischka, H.; Wanner, G.; Efferth, T.; Trauner, D.; Vollmar, A. M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Biol Chem
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        4T1-luc2, IVIS, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        The vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase), a multisubunit proton pump, has come into focus as an attractive target in cancer invasion. However little is known about the role of V-ATPase in cell death and especially the underlying mechanisms remain mostly unknown. We used the myxobacterial macrolide archazolid B, a potent inhibitor of the V-ATPase, as an experimental drug as well as a chemical tool to decipher V-ATPase related cell death signaling. We found that archazolid induced apoptosis in highly invasive tumor cells at nanomolar concentrations which was executed by the mitochondrial pathway. Prior to apoptosis induction archazolid lead to the activation of a cellular stress response including activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF1alpha) and autophagy. Autophagy was induced at low concentrations of archazolid that do not alter pH in lysosomes and was shown by degradation of p62 or fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes. HIF1alpha was induced due to energy stress shown by a decline of the ATP level and followed by a shut down of energy consuming processes. As silencing HIF1alpha increases apoptosis, the cellular stress response was suggested to be a survival mechanism. We conclude that archazolid leads to energy stress which activates adaptive mechanisms like autophagy mediated by HIF1alpha and finally leads to apoptosis. We propose V-ATPase as a promising drugable target in cancer therapy caught up at the interplay of apoptosis, autophagy and cellular/metabolic stress.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23168408
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 9
      15. Serial :
        10480