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      1. Author :
        Griffin, A. J.; Li, L. X.; Voedisch, S.; Pabst, O.; McSorley, S. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Infect Immun
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        79
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen26, Xen 26, Salmonella typhumurium, Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Cell Separation; Disease Models, Animal; Flow Cytometry; Fluoroquinolones/therapeutic use; Intestine, Small/microbiology; Lymph Nodes/*microbiology; Mesentery/immunology/microbiology; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Monocytes/immunology/*microbiology; Recurrence; Salmonella Infections, Animal/immunology/*microbiology/pathology; Salmonella typhi/immunology
      12. Abstract :
        Enteric pathogens can cause relapsing infections in a proportion of treated patients, but greater understanding of this phenomenon is hindered by the lack of appropriate animal models. We report here a robust animal model of relapsing primary typhoid that initiates after apparently successful antibiotic treatment of susceptible mice. Four days of enrofloxacin treatment were sufficient to reduce bacterial loads below detectable levels in all major organs, and mice appeared otherwise healthy. However, any interruption of further antibiotic therapy allowed renewed fecal shedding and renewed bacterial growth in systemic tissues to occur, and mice eventually succumbed to relapsing infection. In vivo imaging of luminescent Salmonella identified the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) as a major reservoir of relapsing infection. A magnetic-bead enrichment strategy isolated MLN-resident CD11b(+) Gr-1(-) monocytes associated with low numbers of persistent Salmonella. However, the removal of MLNs increased the severity of typhoid relapse, demonstrating that this organ serves as a protective filter to restrain the dissemination of bacteria during antibiotic therapy. Together, these data describe a robust animal model of typhoid relapse and identify an important intestinal phagocyte subset involved in protection against the systemic spread of enteric infection.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21263018
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10559
      1. Author :
        Lorentzen, D.; Durairaj, L.; Pezzulo, A. A.; Nakano, Y.; Launspach, J.; Stoltz, D. A.; Zamba, G.; McCray, P. B., Jr.; Zabner, J.; Welsh, M. J.; Nauseef, W. M.; Banfi, B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Free Radic Biol Med
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        50
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen8.1, Xen 8.1, S. aureus, IVIS, bioluminescence imaging
      12. Abstract :
        A recently discovered enzyme system produces antibacterial hypothiocyanite (OSCN(-)) in the airway lumen by oxidizing the secreted precursor thiocyanate (SCN(-)). Airway epithelial cultures have been shown to secrete SCN(-) in a CFTR-dependent manner. Thus, reduced SCN(-) availability in the airway might contribute to the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF), a disease caused by mutations in the CFTR gene and characterized by an airway host defense defect. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing the SCN(-) concentration in the nasal airway surface liquid (ASL) of CF patients and non-CF subjects and in the tracheobronchial ASL of CFTR-DeltaF508 homozygous pigs and control littermates. In the nasal ASL, the SCN(-) concentration was ~30-fold higher than in serum independent of the CFTR mutation status of the human subject. In the tracheobronchial ASL of CF pigs, the SCN(-) concentration was somewhat reduced. Among human subjects, SCN(-) concentrations in the ASL varied from person to person independent of CFTR expression, and CF patients with high SCN(-) levels had better lung function than those with low SCN(-) levels. Thus, although CFTR can contribute to SCN(-) transport, it is not indispensable for the high SCN(-) concentration in ASL. The correlation between lung function and SCN(-) concentration in CF patients may reflect a beneficial role for SCN(-).
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21334431
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10564
      1. Author :
        Goldberg, M. S.; Xing, D.; Ren, Y.; Orsulic, S.; Bhatia, S. N.; Sharp, P. A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        108
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        VivoTag, IVIS, Vivotag, Animals; BRCA1 Protein/*genetics; Drug Carriers; Drug Delivery Systems; Female; Humans; Mice; Nanoparticles/*chemistry; Nanotechnology/methods; Neoplasm Transplantation; Ovarian Neoplasms/*genetics/*therapy; Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases/*genetics; RNA Interference; RNA, Small Interfering/*metabolism; Treatment Outcome
      12. Abstract :
        Inhibition of the DNA repair enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) with small molecules has been shown to be an effective treatment for ovarian cancer with BRCA mutations. Here, we report the in vivo administration of siRNA to Parp1 in mouse models of ovarian cancer. A unique member of the lipid-like materials known as lipidoids is shown to deliver siRNA to disseminated murine ovarian carcinoma allograft tumors following intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. siParp1 inhibits cell growth, primarily by induction of apoptosis, in Brca1-deficient cells both in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, the treatment extends the survival of mice bearing tumors derived from Brca1-deficient ovarian cancer cells but not from Brca1 wild-type cells, confirming the proposed mechanism of synthetic lethality. Because there are 17 members of the Parp family, the inherent complementarity of RNA affords a high level of specificity for therapeutically addressing Parp1 in the context of impaired homologous recombination.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21187397
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 5
      15. Serial :
        10566
      1. Author :
        Matthias Nahrendorf; Edmund Keliher; Brett Marinelli; Peter Waterman; Paolo Fumene Feruglio; Lioubov Fexon; Misha Pivovarov; Filip K. Swirski; Mikael J. Pittet; Claudio Vinegoni; Ralph Weissleder
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        PNAS
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        107
      8. Issue :
        17
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        fluorescence molecular tomography; FMT; Fluorescence Imaging Agents; ProSense; fluorescence-mediated tomography; molecular imaging; multimodal image fusion; computed tomography; cancer
      12. Abstract :
        Fusion imaging of radionuclide-based molecular (PET) and structural data [x-ray computed tomography (CT)] has been firmly established. Here we show that optical measurements [fluorescence-mediated tomography (FMT)] show exquisite congruence to radionuclide measurements and that information can be seamlessly integrated and visualized. Using biocompatible nanoparticles as a generic platform (containing a 18F isotope and a far red fluorochrome), we show good correlations between FMT and PET in probe concentration (r2 > 0.99) and spatial signal distribution (r2 > 0.85). Using a mouse model of cancer and different imaging probes to measure tumoral proteases, macrophage content and integrin expression simultaneously, we demonstrate the distinct tumoral locations of probes in multiple channels in vivo. The findings also suggest that FMT can serve as a surrogate modality for the screening and development of radionuclide-based imaging agents.
      13. URL :
        http://www.pnas.org/content/107/17/7910.abstract?sid=084c1ba8-0b02-4833-acdd-b57bea226faf
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4468
      1. Author :
        Rahul Anil Sheth; Umar Mahmood
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        American Journal of Physiology: Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        299
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        Colorectal cancer; optical imaging; molecular imaging; cancer genetics
      12. Abstract :
        Colorectal cancer remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. The advent of molecular therapies targeted against specific, stereotyped cellular mutations that occur in this disease has ushered in new hope for treatment options. However, key questions regarding the optimal dosing schedules, dosing duration, and patient selection remain unanswered. In this review, we describe how recent advances in molecular imaging, specifically optical molecular imaging with fluorescent probes, offer potential solutions to these questions and may play a key role in improving outcomes. We begin with an overview of optical molecular imaging, including a discussion on the various methods of design for fluorescent probes and the clinically relevant imaging systems that have been built to image them. We then focus on the relevance of optical molecular imaging to colorectal cancer. We review the most recent data on how this imaging modality has been applied to the measurement of treatment efficacy for currently available as well as some as-of-yet developmental molecularly targeted therapies in animal studies. We then conclude with a discussion on how this imaging approach has already begun to be translated clinically for human use.
      13. URL :
        http://ajpgi.physiology.org/cgi/content/abstract/ajpgi.00195.2010v1
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4484
      1. Author :
        J-C Tseng; T Granot; V DiGiacomo; B Levin; D Meruelo
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Gene Therapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        17
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        Sindbis virus; viral vector; vascular leakiness; molecular imaging; chemotherapy; cancer
      12. Abstract :
        Genetic instability of cancer cells generates resistance after initial responses to chemotherapeutic agents. Several oncolytic viruses have been designed to exploit specific signatures of cancer cells, such as important surface markers or pivotal signaling pathways for selective replication. It is less likely for cancer cells to develop resistance given that mutations in these cancer signatures would negatively impact tumor growth and survival. However, as oncolytic viral vectors are large particles, they suffer from inefficient extravasation from tumor blood vessels. Their ability to reach cancer cells is an important consideration in achieving specific oncolytic targeting and potential vector replication. Our previous studies indicated that the Sindbis viral vectors target tumor cells by the laminin receptor. Here, we present evidence that modulating tumor vascular leakiness, using VEGF and/or metronomic chemotherapy regimens, significantly enhances tumor vascular permeability and directly enhances oncolytic Sindbis vector targeting in tumor models. Because host-derived vascular endothelium cells are genetically stable and less likely to develop resistance to chemotherapeutics, a combined metronomic chemotherapeutics and oncolytic vector regimen should provide a new approach for cancer therapy. This mechanism could explain the synergistic treatment outcomes observed in clinical trials of combined therapies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.nature.com/cgt/journal/v17/n4/full/cgt200970a.html
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4485
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Molecular Imaging and Biology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        Optical imaging, Image-guided surgery, Molecular imaging, Near-infrared fluorescence
      12. Abstract :
        In cancer surgery, intra-operative assessment of the tumor-free margin, which is critical for the prognosis of the patient, relies on the visual appearance and palpation of the tumor. Optical imaging techniques provide real-time visualization of the tumor, warranting intra-operative image-guided surgery. Within this field, imaging in the near-infrared light spectrum offers two essential advantages: increased tissue penetration of light and an increased signal-tobackground-ratio of contrast agents. In this article, we review the various techniques, contrast agents, and camera systems that are currently used for image-guided surgery. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the wide range of molecular contrast agents targeting specific hallmarks of cancer and we describe perspectives on its future use in cancer surgery.
      13. URL :
        http://www.springerlink.com/content/78233815221t6563/
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4486
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Angiogenesis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        13
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        angiogenesis imaging; in vivo imaging; Angiogenesis; Bioluminescence; Fluorescence; Molecular imaging; Optical imaging
      12. Abstract :
        In recent years, molecular imaging gained significant importance in biomedical research. Optical imaging developed into a modality which enables the visualization and quantification of all kinds of cellular processes and cancerous cell growth in small animals. Novel gene reporter mice and cell lines and the development of targeted and cleavable fluorescent “smart” probes form a powerful imaging toolbox. The development of systems collecting tomographic bioluminescence and fluorescence data enabled even more spatial accuracy and more quantitative measurements. Here we describe various bioluminescent and fluorescent gene reporter models and probes that can be used to specifically image and quantify neovascularization or the angiogenic process itself.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2911541/
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4488
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