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      1. Author :
        Mathew, B.; Jacobson, J. R.; Berdyshev, E.; Huang, Y.; Sun, X.; Zhao, Y.; Gerhold, L. M.; Siegler, J.; Evenoski, C.; Wang, T.; Zhou, T.; Zaidi, R.; Moreno-Vinasco, L.; Bittman, R.; Chen, C. T.; LaRiviere, P. J.; Sammani, S.; Lussier, Y. A.; Dudek, S. M.; Natarajan, V.; Weichselbaum, R. R.; Garcia, J. G.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Faseb J
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        25
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/chemistry; Ceramides/metabolism; Female; Gene Deletion; Gene Expression Regulation/physiology; Lung/*radiation effects; Lysophospholipids/*chemistry/*pharmacology; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; *Radiation Injuries, Experimental; Receptors, Lysosphingolipid/genetics/metabolism; Sphingolipids/*metabolism; Sphingosine/*analogs & derivatives/chemistry/pharmacology
      12. Abstract :
        Clinically significant radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common toxicity in patients administered thoracic radiotherapy. Although the molecular etiology is poorly understood, we previously characterized a murine model of RILI in which alterations in lung barrier integrity surfaced as a potentially important pathobiological event and genome-wide lung gene mRNA levels identified dysregulation of sphingolipid metabolic pathway genes. We hypothesized that sphingolipid signaling components serve as modulators and novel therapeutic targets of RILI. Sphingolipid involvement in murine RILI was confirmed by radiation-induced increases in lung expression of sphingosine kinase (SphK) isoforms 1 and 2 and increases in the ratio of ceramide to sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and dihydro-S1P (DHS1P) levels in plasma, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and lung tissue. Mice with a targeted deletion of SphK1 (SphK1(-/-)) or with reduced expression of S1P receptors (S1PR1(+/-), S1PR2(-/-), and S1PR3(-/-)) exhibited marked RILI susceptibility. Finally, studies of 3 potent vascular barrier-protective S1P analogs, FTY720, (S)-FTY720-phosphonate (fTyS), and SEW-2871, identified significant RILI attenuation and radiation-induced gene dysregulation by the phosphonate analog, fTyS (0.1 and 1 mg/kg i.p., 2x/wk) and to a lesser degree by SEW-2871 (1 mg/kg i.p., 2x/wk), compared with those in controls. These results support the targeting of S1P signaling as a novel therapeutic strategy in RILI.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21712494
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 18
      15. Serial :
        10371
      1. Author :
        Meincke, M.; Tiwari, S.; Hattermann, K.; Kalthoff, H.; Mentlein, R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Clin Exp Metastasis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        28
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Breast Neoplasms/metabolism/*pathology; Cattle; Chemokine CXCL12/metabolism; Female; Fluorescent Dyes/diagnostic use; Glioma/metabolism/*pathology; Humans; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; Mice; Mice, Nude; Receptors, CXCR/*metabolism; Receptors, CXCR4/*metabolism; Serum Albumin, Bovine/metabolism; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared; Tumor Cells, Cultured
      12. Abstract :
        The chemokine CXCL12/SDF-1 and its receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7 play a major role in tumor invasion, proliferation and metastasis. Since both receptors are overexpressed on distinct tumor cells and on the tumor vasculature, we evaluated their potential as targets for detection of cancers by molecular imaging. We synthesized conjugates of CXCL12 and the near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye IRDye((R))800CW, tested their selectivity, sensitivity and biological activity in vitro and their feasibility to visualize tumors in vivo. Purified CXCL12-conjugates detected in vitro as low as 500 A764 human glioma cells or MCF-7 breast cancer cells that express CXCR7 alone or together with CXCR4. Binding was time- and concentration-dependent, and the label could be competitively displaced by the native peptide. Control conjugates with bovine serum albumin or lactalbumin failed to label the cells. In mice, the conjugate distributed rapidly. After 1-92 h, subcutaneous tumors of human MCF-7 and A764 cells in immunodeficient mice were detected with high sensitivity. Background was observed in particular in liver within the first 24 h, but also skull and hind limbs yielded some background. Overall, fluorescent CXCL12-conjugates are sensitive and selective probes to detect solid and metastatic tumors by targeting tumor cells and tumor vasculature.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21735100
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 13
      15. Serial :
        10372
      1. Author :
        Missbach-Guentner, J.; Hunia, J.; Alves, F.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Int J Dev Biol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        55
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Angiogenesis Inhibitors/therapeutic use; Animals; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Fluorescence; Humans; Luminescence/diagnostic use; Magnetic Resonance Angiography/methods; Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods; Microscopy/methods; Neoplasms/*blood supply/therapy; *Neovascularization, Pathologic/pathology/ultrasonography; Positron-Emission Tomography/methods; Tomography/methods; Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon/methods; Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods; X-Ray Microtomography/methods
      12. Abstract :
        Significant advances have been made in understanding the role of tumor angiogenesis and its influence on tumor progression in cancer. Based on this knowledge, a series of inhibitors of angiogenesis have been developed and evaluated in preclinical and clinical trials. Since detailed information of tumor progression in response to therapy is important to assess the efficacy of anti-tumor treatment in vivo, noninvasive imaging techniques emerge more and more as important tools to monitor alterations in tumor growth and vessel recruitment, as well as metastatic spread over time. So far, remarkable efforts have been made to improve the technical capability of these imaging modalities based on better resolution, as well as to implement multimodal approaches combining molecular with anatomical information. Advanced imaging techniques not only allow the detection and monitoring of tumor development, but also facilitate a broad understanding of the cellular and molecular events that propagate tumor angiogenesis, as well as those occurring in response to therapy. This review provides an overview of different imaging techniques in preclinical settings of oncological research and discusses their potential impact on clinical translation. Imaging modalities will be presented that have been implemented to address key biological issues by exploring tumor angiogenic processes and evaluating antiangiogenic therapy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21858774
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 32
      15. Serial :
        10373
      1. Author :
        Motohara, T.; Masuko, S.; Ishimoto, T.; Yae, T.; Onishi, N.; Muraguchi, T.; Hirao, A.; Matsuzaki, Y.; Tashiro, H.; Katabuchi, H.; Saya, H.; Nagano, O.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Carcinogenesis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        32
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Antigens, Neoplasm/genetics/metabolism; Apoptosis; Blotting, Western; Cell Adhesion; Cell Adhesion Molecules/genetics/metabolism; Cell Differentiation; Cell Movement; Cell Proliferation; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic/metabolism/*pathology; Female; Flow Cytometry; Immunoenzyme Techniques; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Neoplastic Stem Cells/metabolism/*pathology; Ovarian Neoplasms/genetics/metabolism/*pathology; Ovary/metabolism/*pathology; Peritoneal Neoplasms/genetics/metabolism/*secondary; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-myc/genetics/metabolism; Proto-Oncogene Proteins p21(ras)/genetics/metabolism; RNA, Messenger/genetics; RNA, Small Interfering/genetics; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction; Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/antagonists & inhibitors/genetics/*metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        Although the existence of tumor-initiating cells (T-ICs) in several types of human cancer has been documented, the contribution of somatic stem cells to the development of T-ICs has remained unclear. Here, we show that normal mouse ovary contains epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-expressing stem-like cells that possess the ability to differentiate into cytokeratin 8 (CK8)-expressing epithelial progeny cells. Furthermore, RNA interference-mediated transient depletion of the tumor suppressor p53 followed by retrovirus-mediated transfer of c-Myc and K-Ras oncogenes in EpCAM-expressing ovarian stem-like cells resulted in the generation of ovarian T-ICs. The established ovarian T-ICs gave rise to hierarchically organized lethal tumors in vivo and were able to undergo peritoneal metastasis. Finally, subsequent RNA interference-mediated knockdown of p53 in tumor cells triggered the expansion of EpCAM-expressing stem-like tumor cells and induced further tumor growth. These data reveal a role for p53 in the development and expansion of ovarian stem-like tumor cells and subsequent malignant progression.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21828057
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 16
      15. Serial :
        10374
      1. Author :
        Snoeks, T. J.; Khmelinskii, A.; Lelieveldt, B. P.; Kaijzel, E. L.; Lowik, C. W.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Bone
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        48
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Bone Neoplasms/radionuclide imaging/*secondary; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Forecasting; Optics and Photonics/*trends; Positron-Emission Tomography/methods; Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon/methods; X-Ray Microtomography/methods; X-Rays
      12. Abstract :
        Optical Imaging has evolved into one of the standard molecular imaging modalities used in pre-clinical cancer research. Bone research however, strongly depends on other imaging modalities such as SPECT, PET, x-ray and muCT. Each imaging modality has its own specific strengths and weaknesses concerning spatial resolution, sensitivity and the possibility to quantify the signal. An increasing number of bone specific optical imaging models and probes have been developed over the past years. This review gives an overview of optical imaging modalities, models and probes that can be used to study skeletal complications of cancer in small laboratory animals.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20688203
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 19
      15. Serial :
        10378
      1. Author :
        Tekabe, Y.; Klose, A.; Nizami, S.; Luma, J.; Lee, F. Y.; Johnson, L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Biophotonics
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        4
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Antigens, CD31/metabolism; Capillaries/metabolism; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Femoral Artery/surgery; Fluorescent Dyes/*diagnostic use/metabolism; Hindlimb/*blood supply/metabolism/pathology; Integrin alphaV/metabolism; Integrin alphaVbeta3/antagonists & inhibitors/metabolism; Ischemia/*pathology; Ligation; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred Strains; Microscopy, Fluorescence; *Neovascularization, Physiologic; Plant Lectins/metabolism; Sensitivity and Specificity
      12. Abstract :
        Optical agents targeting alpha(v)beta(3) are potential tools to image the angiogenic response to limb ischemia. The left (L) femoral artery was ligated in 17 mice and sham surgery performed on the contralateral right (R) hindlimb. Seven days later, IntegriSense (2 nmol) was injected into 11 mice and 6 were probe controls. Six hours later, mice underwent optical imaging. Ratios of photon flux in the L/R limbs were calculated. Tissue was stained for alpha(v) , CD31, and lectin. The signal was increased in the ischemic limbs compared to contralateral legs and ratio of photon flux in L/R limb averaged 2.37. Control probe showed no hindlimb signal. IntegriSense colocalized with CD31 by dual fluorescent staining. Ratios for L/R hindlimbs correlated with quantitative lectin staining (r = 0.88, p = 0.003). Optical imaging can identify and quantify angiogenic response to hindlimb ischemia.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22031282
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10380
      1. Author :
        Themelis, G.; Harlaar, N. J.; Kelder, W.; Bart, J.; Sarantopoulos, A.; van Dam, G. M.; Ntziachristos, V.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Ann Surg Oncol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        18
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Cell Line, Tumor; *Diagnostic Imaging; Female; Fluorescence; Fluorescent Dyes/*diagnostic use; Humans; Integrin alphaVbeta3/*metabolism; Luciferases/metabolism; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental/*diagnosis/metabolism; Mice; Mice, Nude; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: This study was designed to improve the surgical procedure and outcome of cancer surgery by means of real-time molecular imaging feedback of tumor spread and margin delineation using targeted near-infrared fluorescent probes with specificity to tumor biomarkers. Surgical excision of cancer often is confronted with difficulties in the identification of cancer spread and the accurate delineation of tumor margins. Currently, the assessment of tumor borders is afforded by postoperative pathology or, less reliably, intraoperative frozen sectioning. Fluorescence imaging is a natural modality for intraoperative use by directly relating to the surgeon's vision and offers highly attractive characteristics, such as high-resolution, sensitivity, and portability. Via the use of targeted probes it also becomes highly tumor-specific and can lead to significant improvements in surgical procedures and outcome. METHODS: Mice bearing xenograft human tumors were injected with alphavbeta3-integrin receptor-targeted fluorescent probe and in vivo visualized by using a novel, real-time, multispectral fluorescence imaging system. Confirmatory ex vivo imaging, bioluminescence imaging, and histopathology were used to validate the in vivo findings. RESULTS: Fluorescence images were all in good correspondence with the confirming bioluminescence images in respect to signal colocalization. Fluorescence imaging detected all tumors and successfully guided total tumor excision by effectively detecting small tumor residuals, which occasionally were missed by the surgeon. Tumor tissue exhibited target-to-background ratio of ~4.0, which was significantly higher compared with white-light images representing the visual contrast. Histopathology confirmed the capability of the method to identify tumor negative margins with high specificity and better prediction rate compared with visual inspection. CONCLUSIONS: Real-time multispectral fluorescence imaging using tumor specific molecular probes is a promising modality for tumor excision by offering real time feedback to the surgeon in the operating room.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21509632
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 11
      15. Serial :
        10381
      1. Author :
        Valdivia, Y. Alvarado M.; Wong, K.; Cheng He, T.; Xue, Z.; Wong, S. T.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Vasc Interv Radiol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        22
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Cell Line, Tumor; Fiber Optic Technology/*methods; Fluorescent Dyes/*administration & dosage/*diagnostic use; Humans; Injections, Intralesional; Lung Neoplasms/*pathology; Microscopy, Fluorescence/*methods; Molecular Imaging/*methods; Rabbits; Surgery, Computer-Assisted/*methods; Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
      12. Abstract :
        PURPOSE: To show the feasibility of computed tomography (CT) image-guided fiberoptic confocal fluorescence molecular imaging in a rabbit lung tumor model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eight lung tumor models were created by injection of a VX2 cell suspension. The fluorescent imaging agent IntegriSense 680 was given to the animals 3.5-4 hours before the procedure. CT images were obtained and transferred to the minimally invasive multimodality image-guided (MIMIG) system as a guidance map. A real-time electromagnetically tracked needle was inserted under the visual guidance of the MIMIG system. A second CT image was obtained to confirm the location of the needle tip. Next, fiberoptic fluorescence imaging was acquired along the needle track. Finally, tumor samples were obtained for histopathologic confirmation. RESULTS: All cases were performed during breath-hold. Tumor size was 12.5 mm +/- 1.6; the distance from the chest wall was 2.1 mm +/- 0.5. The needle tip reached the tumor in all cases with an accuracy of 3.3 mm +/- 1.6. Only one skin entry point was necessary, and no needle adjustments were required. No pneumothorax was observed. At least two-fold alpha(v)beta(3) integrin image contrast was detected in the tumor compared with normal lung tissue. Tumor samples were confirmed to have viable VX2 cells and contrast uptake. CONCLUSIONS: The MIMIG system enables effective in situ fluorescence molecular imaging in a needle biopsy lung procedure. In situ alpha(v)beta(3) integrin molecular imaging allows molecular characterization of lung tumors at multiple regions and can be used to guide biopsy procedures.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22019854
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 14
      15. Serial :
        10383
      1. Author :
        Leszczynska, K.; Namiot, A.; Cruz, K.; Byfield, F. J.; Won, E.; Mendez, G.; Sokolowski, W.; Savage, P. B.; Bucki, R.; Janmey, P. A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Appl Microbiol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        110
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen5, Xen 5, Pseudomonas aeruginosa Xen 5, Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage/*pharmacology/therapeutic; use; Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides/chemistry; Biofilms/drug effects; Cholic Acid/chemistry; Cystic Fibrosis/microbiology; Hemolysis/drug effects; Humans; *Poloxamer; Pseudomonas Infections/drug therapy; Pseudomonas aeruginosa/drug effects/growth & development; Skin Diseases, Bacterial/drug therapy; Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects; Steroids/administration & dosage/*pharmacology/therapeutic use; *Surface-Active Agents
      12. Abstract :
        AIMS: Ceragenin CSA-13 is a synthetic mimic of cationic antibacterial peptides, with facial amphiphilic morphology reproduced using a cholic acid scaffold. Previous data have shown that this molecule displays broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, which decreases in the presence of blood plasma. However, at higher concentrations, CSA-13 can cause lysis of erythrocytes. This study was designed to assess in vitro antibacterial and haemolytic activity of CSA-13 in the presence of pluronic F-127. METHODS AND RESULTS: CSA-13 bactericidal activity against clinical strains of bacteria associated with topical infections and in an experimental setting relevant to their pathophysiological environment, such as various epithelial tissue fluids and the airway sputum of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF), was evaluated using minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericidal concentration (MIC/MBC) measurements and bacterial killing assays. We found that in the presence of pluronic F-127, CSA-13 antibacterial activity was only slightly decreased, but CSA-13 haemolytic activity was significantly inhibited. CSA-13 exhibits bacterial killing activity against clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant strains, Pseudomonas aeruginosa present in CF sputa, and biofilms formed by different Gram (+) and Gram (-) bacteria. CSA-13 bactericidal action is partially compromised in the presence of plasma, but is maintained in ascites, cerebrospinal fluid, saliva, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The synergistic action of CSA-13, determined by the use of a standard checkerboard assay, reveals an increase in CSA-13 antibacterial activity in the presence of host defence molecules such as the cathelicidin LL-37 peptide, lysozyme, lactoferrin and secretory phospholipase A (sPLA). CONCLUSION: These results suggest that CSA-13 may be useful to prevent and treat topical infection. SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY: Combined application of CSA-13 with pluronic F-127 may be beneficial by reducing CSA-13 toxicity.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20961363
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10389
      1. Author :
        Lamppa, J. W.; Ackerman, M. E.; Lai, J. I.; Scanlon, T. C.; Griswold, K. E.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen5, Xen 5, Pseudomonas aeruginosa Xen 5
      12. Abstract :
        Alginate lyase enzymes represent prospective biotherapeutic agents for treating bacterial infections, particularly in the cystic fibrosis airway. To effectively deimmunize one therapeutic candidate while maintaining high level catalytic proficiency, a combined genetic engineering-PEGylation strategy was implemented. Rationally designed, site-specific PEGylation variants were constructed by orthogonal maleimide-thiol coupling chemistry. In contrast to random PEGylation of the enzyme by NHS-ester mediated chemistry, controlled mono-PEGylation of A1-III alginate lyase produced a conjugate that maintained wild type levels of activity towards a model substrate. Significantly, the PEGylated variant exhibited enhanced solution phase kinetics with bacterial alginate, the ultimate therapeutic target. The immunoreactivity of the PEGylated enzyme was compared to a wild type control using in vitro binding studies with both enzyme-specific antibodies, from immunized New Zealand white rabbits, and a single chain antibody library, derived from a human volunteer. In both cases, the PEGylated enzyme was found to be substantially less immunoreactive. Underscoring the enzyme's potential for practical utility, >90% of adherent, mucoid, Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were removed from abiotic surfaces following a one hour treatment with the PEGylated variant, whereas the wild type enzyme removed only 75% of biofilms in parallel studies. In aggregate, these results demonstrate that site-specific mono-PEGylation of genetically engineered A1-III alginate lyase yielded an enzyme with enhanced performance relative to therapeutically relevant metrics.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21340021
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10388
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