1. Resources
  2. Citations Library

Citation Details

You are viewing citation details. You can save or export citation(s) below, access an article, or start a new search.

331–340 of 499 records found matching your query:
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All

Headers act as filters

      1. Author :
        Blagbrough, Ian S; Zara, Chiara
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Pharmaceutical research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        26
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Cats; Cattle; Disease Models, Animal; Dna; Dogs; Drug Delivery Systems; Female; Fishes; Gene Therapy; Horses; Humans; Mice; PC-3M-luc; Pregnancy; Primates; Rats; RNA, Small Interfering; Sheep; Swine
      12. Abstract :
        Nanoparticles, including lipopolyamines leading to lipoplexes, liposomes, and polyplexes are targeted drug carrier systems in the current search for a successful delivery system for polynucleic acids. This review is focused on the impact of gene and siRNA delivery for studies of efficacy, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacokinetics within the setting of the wide variety of in vivo animal models now used. This critical appraisal of the recent literature sets out the different models that are currently being investigated to bridge from studies in cell lines through towards clinical reality. Whilst many scientists will be familiar with rodent (murine, fecine, cricetine, and musteline) models, few probably think of fish as a clinically relevant animal model, but zebrafish, madake, and rainbow trout are all being used. Larger animal models include rabbit, cat, dog, and cow. Pig is used both for the prevention of foot-and-mouth disease and human diseases, sheep is a model for corneal transplantation, and the horse naturally develops arthritis. Non-human primate models (macaque, common marmoset, owl monkey) are used for preclinical gene vector safety and efficacy trials to bridge the gap prior to clinical studies. We aim for the safe development of clinically effective delivery systems for DNA and RNAi technologies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18841450
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8965
      1. Author :
        Hickson, Jonathan
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Urologic oncology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        27
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Biological Markers; Bioware; Diagnostic Imaging; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; Luminescent Measurements; Luminescent Proteins; Molecular Probes; Optical Devices; Optical Phenomena; PC-3M-luc; Reproducibility of Results
      12. Abstract :
        There has recently been an explosion in the availability of new technologies to noninvasively detect biological processes in preclinical models. One such modality, optical imaging, comprises using bioluminescent and fluorescent reporters and probes to repetitively interrogate molecular events and monitor disease progression in animal models. This review includes an overview of optical imaging technologies (e.g., hardware, reporters, probes) available for small animal imaging and their application in monitoring disease progression, therapeutic efficacy, and molecular processes such as proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. Also discussed are some of the challenges associated with in vivo optical imaging and the necessary controls and biological correlates one must include in experimental design and interpretation for successful preclinical studies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19414115
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8964
      1. Author :
        Okuda, Tomoyuki; Kawaguchi, Yasuhisa; Okamoto, Hirokazu
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Current topics in medicinal chemistry
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        9
      8. Issue :
        12
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Bioware; Gene Silencing; PC-3M-luc; Peptides; Proteins; RNA Interference; Transfection
      12. Abstract :
        RNA interference (RNAi) is an attractive phenomenon for practical use that specifically inhibits gene expression and is carried out by small double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) including small interfering RNA (siRNA) or short hairpin RNA (shRNA). In addition, RNAi is of great interest for clinical use to cure refractory diseases related to the expression of a specific gene. To achieve gene silencing in the body, a sufficient amount of dsRNA must be delivered and internalized into target cells. However, dsRNAs have a large molecular weight and net negative charge, which limits their membrane-permeating ability. Moreover, dsRNAs are rapidly degraded by endonucleses in the body. Therefore, for the efficient delivery of dsRNAs, many approaches based on drug delivery systems have been carried out. In this review, we focus on recent reports about the application of functional peptides and proteins designed for the efficient delivery of dsRNAs.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19860710
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8962
      1. Author :
        Priddle, Helen; Grabowska, Anna; Morris, Teresa; Clarke, Philip A; McKenzie, Andrew J; Sottile, Virginie; Denning, Chris; Young, Lorraine; Watson, Sue
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Cloning and stem cells
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        11
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Cell Differentiation; Chick Embryo; Embryonic Stem Cells; Fluorescent Dyes; Humans; Luciferases; Luminescent Measurements; Mice; Mice, SCID; PC-3M-luc; Software; Stem Cell Transplantation; Teratoma
      12. Abstract :
        Research into the behavior, efficacy, and biosafety of stem cells with a view to clinical transplantation requires the development of noninvasive methods for in vivo imaging of cells transplanted into animal models. This is particularly relevant for human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), because transplantation of undifferentiated hESCs leads to tumor formation. The present study aimed to monitor hESCs in real time when injected in vivo. hESCs were stably transfected to express luciferase, and luciferase expression was clearly detected in the undifferentiated and differentiated state. When transfected hESCs were injected into chick embryos, bioluminescence could be detected both ex and in ovo. In the SCID mouse model, undifferentiated hESCs were detectable after injection either into the muscle layer of the peritoneum or the kidney capsule. Tumors became detectable between days 10-30, with approximately a 3 log increase in the luminescence signal by day 75. The growth phase occurred earlier in the kidney capsule and then reached a plateau, whilst tumors in the peritoneal wall grew steadily throughout the period analysed. These results show the widespread utility of bioluminescent for in vivo imaging of hESCs in a variety of model systems for preclinical research into regenerative medicine and cancer biology.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19522673
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8961
      1. Author :
        Huang, Yujie; Song, Nan; Ding, Yanping; Yuan, Shaopeng; Li, Xuhui; Cai, Hongchen; Shi, Hubing; Luo, Yongzhang
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Cancer research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        69
      8. Issue :
        19
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Angiopoietin-2; Animals; Bioware; Breast Neoplasms; Capillary Permeability; Female; Gene Expression; Humans; Lung; Lung Neoplasms; Matrix Metalloproteinase 10; Matrix Metalloproteinase 3; MDA-MB-231-D3H1 cells; Melanoma, Experimental; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Nude; RNA Interference; Up-Regulation
      12. Abstract :
        Before metastasis, certain organs have already been influenced by primary tumors. However, the exact alterations and regulatory mechanisms of the premetastatic organs remain poorly understood. Here, we report that, in the premetastatic stage, angiopoietin 2 (Angpt2), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 3, and MMP10 are up-regulated in the lung by primary B16/F10 tumor, which leads to the increased permeability of pulmonary vasculatures and extravasation of circulating tumor cells. Subsequent studies show that Angpt2, MMP3, and MMP10 have a synergistic effect on disrupting vascular integrity in both in vitro and in vivo models. Lentivirus-based in vivo RNA interference of Angpt2, MMP3, and MMP10 attenuates the pulmonary vascular permeability and suppresses the infiltration of myeloid cells in the premetastatic lung. Moreover, knocking down these factors significantly inhibits the spontaneous lung metastasis in the model by orthotopic implantation of MDA-MB-231-Luc-D3H1 cells in nude mice. Further investigations reveal that the malignancy of tumor cells is positively correlated with their capabilities to induce the expression of Angpt2, MMP3, and MMP10. Luciferase reporter assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay also suggest that transforming growth factor-beta1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha signaling are involved in the regulation of these premetastatic factors. Our study shows that pulmonary vascular destabilization in the premetastatic phase promotes the extravasation of tumor cells and facilitates lung metastasis, which may provide potential targets for clinical prevention of metastasis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19773447
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8989
      1. Author :
        Marttila-Ichihara, Fumiko; Auvinen, Kaisa; Elima, Kati; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Salmi, Marko
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Cancer research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        69
      8. Issue :
        19
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Amine Oxidase (Copper-Containing); Animals; Antigens, CD11b; B16-F10-luc-G5 cells; Bioware; Cell Adhesion Molecules; Cell Growth Processes; Female; Lymphoma; Male; Melanoma, Experimental; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Transgenic; Myeloid Cells; Neovascularization, Pathologic; Oxidoreductases; Receptors, Chemokine
      12. Abstract :
        Cancer growth is regulated by several nonmalignant cell types, such as leukocytes and endothelial cells, which reside in the stroma of the tumor. Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is an amine oxidase enzyme that is expressed on the surface of endothelial cells. It supports leukocyte traffic into inflamed tissues, but nothing is known about its possible role in cancer biology in vivo. Here, we report that B16 melanoma and EL-4 lymphoma remain smaller in VAP-1-deficient mice than in wild-type controls. We found an unexpected defect in tumor angiogenesis in the absence of VAP-1. VAP-1 also selectively enhanced the recruitment of Gr-1+CD11b+ myeloid cells into the tumors. Generation of mice expressing enzymatically inactive VAP-1 showed that the oxidase activity of VAP-1 was necessary to support neoangiogenesis, myeloid cell recruitment, and tumor growth in vivo. These data describe VAP-1 as the first adhesion molecule known to be involved in the recruitment of Gr-1+CD11b+ myeloid cells into tumors. They also suggest that VAP-1 is a potential new tool for immunotherapy of tumors that could be exploited to reduce tumor burden by controlling the traffic of Gr-1+CD11b+ myeloid cells.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19789345
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8997
      1. Author :
        Xiao, Kai; Luo, Juntao; Fowler, Wiley L; Li, Yuanpei; Lee, Joyce S; Xing, Li; Cheng, R Holland; Wang, Li; Lam, Kit S
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Biomaterials
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        30
      8. Issue :
        30
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Albumins; Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Biocompatible Materials; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Drug Delivery Systems; Emulsifying Agents; Female; Humans; Male; Maximum Tolerated Dose; Mice; Mice, Nude; Nanoparticles; Ovarian Neoplasms; Paclitaxel; Polyethylene Glycols; SKOV3-luc-D3 cells; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared
      12. Abstract :
        Paclitaxel (PTX) is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic drugs for the treatment of a variety of cancers. However, it is associated with serious side effects caused by PTX itself and the Cremophor EL emulsifier. In the present study, we report the development of a well-defined amphiphilic linear-dendritic copolymer (named as telodendrimer) composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG), cholic acid (CA, a facial amphiphilic molecule) and lysine, which can form drug-loaded core/shell micelles when mixed with hydrophobic drug, such as PTX, under aqueous condition. We have used PEG(5k)-CA(8), a representive telodendrimer, to prepare paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles (PTX-PEG(5k)-CA(8) NPs) with high loading capacity (7.3 mg PTX/mL) and a size of 20-60 nm. This novel nanoformulation of PTX was found to exhibit similar in vitro cytotoxic activity against ovarian cancer cells as the free drug (Taxol) or paclitaxel/human serum albumin nanoaggregate (Abraxane). The maximum tolerated doses (MTDs) of PTX-PEG(5k)-CA(8) NPs after single dose and five consecutive daily doses in mice were approximately 75 and 45 mg PTX/kg, respectively, which were 2.5-fold higher than those of Taxol. In both subcutaneous and orthotopic intraperitoneal murine models of ovarian cancer, PTX-PEG(5k)-CA(8) NPs achieved superior toxicity profiles and anti-tumor effects compared to Taxol and Abraxane at equivalent PTX doses, which were attributed to their preferential tumor accumulation, and deep penetration into tumor tissue, as confirmed by near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19660809
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9013
      1. Author :
        Engelsman, Anton F; Krom, Bastiaan P; Busscher, Henk J; van Dam, Gooitzen M; Ploeg, Rutger J; van der Mei, Henny C
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Acta biomaterialia
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bioware; Connective Tissue; Diffusion; Drug Implants; Female; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Nitric Oxide; Polyvinyls; Prostheses and Implants; pXen-5; Staphylococcal Infections; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Infection of surgical meshes used in abdominal wall reconstructions often leads to removal of the implant and increases patient morbidity due to repetitive operations and hospital administrations. Treatment with antibiotics is ineffective due to the biofilm mode of growth of the infecting bacteria and bears the risk of inducing antibiotic resistance. Hence there is a need for alternative methods to prevent and treat mesh infection. Nitric oxide (NO)-releasing coatings have been demonstrated to possess bactericidal properties in vitro. It is the aim of this study to assess possible benefits of a low concentration NO-releasing carbon-based coating on monofilament polypropylene meshes with respect to infection control in vitro and in vivo. When applied on surgical meshes, NO-releasing coatings showed significant bactericidal effect on in vitro biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and CNS. However, using bioluminescent in vivo imaging, no beneficial effects of this NO-releasing coating on subcutaneously implanted surgical meshes in mice could be observed.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19251498
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9019
      1. Author :
        Engelsman, Anton F; van der Mei, Henny C; Francis, Kevin P; Busscher, Henk J; Ploeg, Rutger J; van Dam, Gooitzen M
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Journal of biomedical materials research. Part B, Applied biomaterials
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        88
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Infective Agents; Bacterial Adhesion; Biofilms; Bioware; Chromosomes, Bacterial; Colony Count, Microbial; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Prostheses and Implants; pXen-5; Soft Tissue Infections; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Infection is the main cause of biomaterials-related failure. A simple technique to test in-vivo new antimicrobial and/or nonadhesive implant coatings is unavailable. Current in vitro methods for studying bacterial adhesion and growth on biomaterial surfaces lack the influence of the host immune system. Most in vivo methods to study biomaterials-related infections routinely involve implant-removal, preventing comprehensive longitudinal monitoring. In vivo imaging circumvents these drawbacks and is based on the use of noninvasive optical imaging of bioluminescent bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus Xen29 is genetically modified to be stably bioluminescent, by the introduction of a modified full lux operon onto its chromosome. Surgical meshes with adhering S. aureus Xen29 were implanted in mice and bacterial growth and spread into the surrounding tissue was monitored longitudinally from bioluminescence with a highly sensitive CCD camera. Distinct spatiotemporal bioluminescence patterns, extending beyond the mesh area into surrounding tissues were observed. After 10 days, the number of living organisms isolated from explanted meshes was found to correlate with bioluminescence prior to sacrifice of the animals. Therefore, it is concluded that in vivo imaging using bioluminescent bacteria is ideally suited to study antimicrobial coatings taking into account the host immune system. In addition, longitudinal monitoring of infection in one animal will significantly reduce the number of experiments and animals.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18618733
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9020
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All