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      1. Author :
        Mitchell, Dianne; Pobre, Eileen G; Mulivor, Aaron W; Grinberg, Asya V; Castonguay, Roselyne; Monnell, Travis E; Solban, Nicolas; Ucran, Jeffrey A; Pearsall, R Scott; Underwood, Kathryn W; Seehra, Jasbir; Kumar, Ravindra
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Molecular cancer therapeutics
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        9
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Activin Receptors, Type II; Animals; Bioware; Bone Morphogenetic Proteins; CHO Cells; Cricetinae; Cricetulus; Endothelial Cells; Endothelium, Vascular; Growth Differentiation Factor 2; Humans; MCF-7-luc-F5 cells; Mice; Neoplasms; Neovascularization, Pathologic; Surface Plasmon Resonance; Telangiectasia, Hereditary Hemorrhagic
      12. Abstract :
        Activin receptor-like kinase-1 (ALK1) is a type I, endothelial cell-specific member of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily of receptors known to play an essential role in modulating angiogenesis and vessel maintenance. In the present study, we sought to examine the angiogenic and tumorigenic effects mediated upon the inhibition of ALK1 signaling using a soluble chimeric protein (ALK1-Fc). Of 29 transforming growth factor-beta-related ligands screened by surface plasmon resonance, only bone morphogenetic protein (BMP9) and BMP10 displayed high-affinity binding to ALK1-Fc. In cell-based assays, ALK1-Fc inhibited BMP9-mediated Id-1 expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and inhibited cord formation by these cells on a Matrigel substrate. In a chick chorioallantoic membrane assay, ALK1-Fc reduced vascular endothelial growth factor-, fibroblast growth factor-, and BMP10-mediated vessel formation. The growth of B16 melanoma explants was also inhibited significantly by ALK1-Fc in this assay. Finally, ALK1-Fc treatment reduced tumor burden in mice receiving orthotopic grafts of MCF7 mammary adenocarcinoma cells. These data show the efficacy of chimeric ALK1-Fc proteins in mitigating vessel formation and support the view that ALK1-Fc is a powerful antiangiogenic agent capable of blocking vascularization.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20124460
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9010
      1. Author :
        Razavi, Reza; Harrison, Lawrence E
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Annals of surgical oncology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        17
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Carcinoma; Cell Proliferation; Colonic Neoplasms; DNA Damage; Drug Therapy, Combination; Female; HT-29-luc-D6 cells; Humans; Hydrogen peroxide; Hyperthermia, Induced; Injections, Intraperitoneal; Mice; Mice, Nude; Oxidants; Oxidative Stress; Survival Rate; tert-Butylhydroperoxide; Treatment Outcome; Tumor Cells, Cultured
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND The purpose of this study was to extend our in vitro observations that induced oxidative stress under hyperthermic conditions decreases tumor cell growth into a preclinical murine model of hyperthermic perfusion. METHODS A nude mouse model of colon cancer carcinomatosis with HT-29-Luc-D6 colon cancer cells was established, and tumor growth was measured by serial bioluminescent imaging. RESULTS By means of a survival model of hyperthermic perfusion, we demonstrated that perfusion with normothermic saline decreased tumor growth compared with no perfusion controls, and tumor growth was further decreased with hyperthermic perfusion alone. The induction of oxidative stress with hydrogen peroxide in the perfusate at concentrations as high as 600 microM was well tolerated in this model of hyperthermic perfusion. Importantly, induced oxidative stress using hydrogen peroxide under hyperthermic conditions significantly decreased in vivo tumor cell growth compared with all other controls. CONCLUSIONS On the basis of our observations, thermal sensitization through modulation of cellular oxidative stress may represent a novel approach to increase the efficacy of hyperthermia as an anticancer modality.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19711132
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9008
      1. Author :
        Shimomura, Toshiyasu; Hasako, Shinichi; Nakatsuru, Yoko; Mita, Takashi; Ichikawa, Koji; Kodera, Tsutomu; Sakai, Takumi; Nambu, Tadahiro; Miyamoto, Mayu; Takahashi, Ikuko; Miki, Satomi; Kawanishi, Nobuhiko; Ohkubo, Mitsuru; Kotani, Hidehito; Iwasawa, Yoshikazu
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Molecular cancer therapeutics
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        9
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols; Bioware; Cell Death; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Proliferation; Cyclohexanecarboxylic Acids; HeLa-luc; Humans; Inhibitory Concentration 50; Mice; Mitosis; Protein kinase inhibitors; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases; Rats; Taxoids; Thiazoles; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Aurora-A kinase is a one of the key regulators during mitosis progression. Aurora-A kinase is a potential target for anticancer therapies because overexpression of Aurora-A, which is frequently observed in some human cancers, results in aberrant mitosis leading to chromosomal instability and possibly tumorigenesis. MK-5108 is a novel small molecule with potent inhibitory activity against Aurora-A kinase. Although most of the Aurora-kinase inhibitors target both Aurora-A and Aurora-B, MK-5108 specifically inhibited Aurora-A kinase in a panel of protein kinase assays. Inhibition of Aurora-A by MK-5108 in cultured cells induced cell cycle arrest at the G(2)-M phase in flow cytometry analysis. The effect was confirmed by the accumulation of cells with expression of phosphorylated Histone H3 and inhibition of Aurora-A autophosphorylation by immunostaining assays. MK-5108 also induced phosphorylated Histone H3 in skin and xenograft tumor tissues in a nude rat xenograft model. MK-5108 inhibited growth of human tumor cell lines in culture and in different xenograft models. Furthermore, the combination of MK-5108 and docetaxel showed enhanced antitumor activities compared with control and docetaxel alone-treated animals without exacerbating the adverse effects of docetaxel. MK-5108 is currently tested in clinical trials and offers a new therapeutic approach to combat human cancers as a single agent or in combination with existing taxane therapies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20053775
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9006
      1. Author :
        Engelsman, Anton F; van Dam, Gooitzen M; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J; Ploeg, Rutger J
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Annals of surgery
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        251
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Abdominal Wall; Animals; Bioware; Female; Luminescent Measurements; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Polypropylenes; Polytetrafluoroethylene; pXen-5; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Surgical Mesh; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVE To study the influence of morphology of surgical meshes on the course of bacterial infection under the influence of the host immune system in an in vivo chronic bacterial infection model. BACKGROUND The use of prosthetic meshes has increased dramatically the last decades in abdominal wall reconstructive surgery. Whereas infection is becoming a more frequent complication, attention is increasingly drawn to the influence of the surgeon's mesh choice on the course of this complication. METHODS Samples of 6 often applied surgical meshes were contaminated with a bioluminescent strain of Staphylococcus aureus and implanted subcutaneously in an immunocompetent BALB/c mouse. The intensity and the spreading of bioluminescence (ie, p/s/cm/sr) were analyzed non-invasively in vivo during a 10-day follow-up period. RESULTS Over the course of infection, multifilament polypropylene and hydrophobic materials showed a significantly higher persistence of bacteria as well as spreading of infection compared to all other meshes. In contrast, infection resolved in almost all animals with a low-weight polyester mesh. CONCLUSION The results of this study are in accordance with circumstantial evidence from limited clinical reports on infection involving surgical meshes and suggest that multifilament and hydrophobic meshes significantly increase bacterial persistence or spreading in the infected area in contrast to monofilament polypropylene and lightweight meshes. Therefore, the surgeon should consider this outcome when choosing a mesh graft for limiting infection in abdominal wall repair.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19864938
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9017
      1. Author :
        Xu, Xiulan; Miller, Sally A; Baysal-Gurel, Fulya; Gartemann, Karl-Heinz; Eichenlaub, Rudolf; Rajashekara, Gireesh
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Applied and environmental microbiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        76
      8. Issue :
        12
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Actinomycetales; Bioware; Genes, Reporter; Genetic Engineering; Luminescent Proteins; Lycopersicon esculentum; Mirabilis; Plant Diseases; pXen-13; Recombinant Proteins; Seeds; Staining and Labeling
      12. Abstract :
        Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis is a Gram-positive bacterium that causes wilting and cankers, leading to severe economic losses in commercial tomato production worldwide. The disease is transmitted from infected seeds to seedlings and mechanically from plant to plant during seedling production, grafting, pruning, and harvesting. Because of the lack of tools for genetic manipulation, very little is known regarding the mechanisms of seed and seedling infection and movement of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis in grafted plants, two focal points for application of bacterial canker control measures in tomato. To facilitate studies on the C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis movement in tomato seed and grafted plants, we isolated a bioluminescent C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis strain using the modified Tn1409 containing a promoterless lux reporter. A total of 19 bioluminescent C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis mutants were obtained. All mutants tested induced a hypersensitive response in Mirabilis jalapa and caused wilting of tomato plants. Real-time colonization studies of germinating seeds using a virulent, stable, constitutively bioluminescent strain, BL-Cmm17, showed that C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis aggregated on hypocotyls and cotyledons at an early stage of germination. In grafted seedlings in which either the rootstock or scion was exposed to BL-Cmm17 via a contaminated grafting knife, bacteria were translocated in both directions from the graft union at higher inoculum doses. These results emphasize the use of bioluminescent C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis to help better elucidate the C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis-tomato plant interactions. Further, we demonstrated the broader applicability of this tool by successful transformation of C. michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis with Tn1409::lux. Thus, our approach would be highly useful to understand the pathogenesis of diseases caused by other subspecies of the agriculturally important C. michiganensis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20400561
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9028
      1. Author :
        Balibar, Carl J; Shen, Xiaoyu; McGuire, Dorothy; Yu, Donghui; McKenney, David; Tao, Jianshi
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Microbiology (Reading, England)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        156
      8. Issue :
        Pt 5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bacterial Proteins; Bacteriolysis; Bioware; Cell Wall; Gene Expression Profiling; Gene Knockout Techniques; Genes, Reporter; Lysostaphin; Mice; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Sepsis; Staphylococcus aureus; Virulence; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Transcriptional profiling data accumulated in recent years for the clinically relevant pathogen Staphylococcus aureus have established a cell wall stress stimulon, which comprises a coordinately regulated set of genes that are upregulated in response to blockage of cell wall biogenesis. In particular, the expression of cwrA (SA2343, N315 notation), which encodes a putative 63 amino acid polypeptide of unknown biological function, increases over 100-fold in response to cell wall inhibition. Herein, we seek to understand the biological role that this gene plays in S. aureus. cwrA was found to be robustly induced by all cell wall-targeting antibiotics tested – vancomycin, oxacillin, penicillin G, phosphomycin, imipenem, hymeglusin and bacitracin – but not by antibiotics with other mechanisms of action, including ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, triclosan, rifampicin, novobiocin and carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone. Although a DeltacwrA S. aureus strain had no appreciable shift in MICs for cell wall-targeting antibiotics, the knockout was shown to have reduced cell wall integrity in a variety of other assays. Additionally, the gene was shown to be important for virulence in a mouse sepsis model of infection.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20167623
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9037
      1. Author :
        Gillrie, Mark R; Zbytnuik, Lori; McAvoy, Erin; Kapadia, Roxna; Lee, Kristine; Waterhouse, Christopher C M; Davis, Shevaun P; Muruve, Daniel A; Kubes, Paul; Ho, May
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        European journal of immunology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        40
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Chemotaxis, Leukocyte; Endothelial Cells; Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay; Humans; Interferon-gamma; Lipopolysaccharides; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Teichoic Acids; Toll-Like Receptor 2; Transplantation Chimera; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        The response of leukocytes to lipoteichoic acid (LTA), a TLR2-dependent major cell wall component of Staphylococcus aureus, is linked to the outcome of an infection. In this study we investigated the role of nonhematopoietic TLR2 in response to LTA and S. aureus by creating bone marrow chimeras. Significant leukocyte recruitment in response to LTA required IFN-gamma priming in WT C57BL/6 and TLR2(-/-)-->WT mice, but was not observed in TLR2(-/-) or WT-->TLR2(-/-) animals. LTA also induced a proinflammatory response in IFN-gamma primed primary human microvascular endothelial cells leading to leukocyte recruitment in vitro. When mice were infected with S. aureus, the most profound elevation of TNF-alpha and IL-6 was seen in TLR2(-/-) and TLR2(-/-)-->WT mice. TLR2(-/-), but not chimeric mice, demonstrated increased IL-17, blood leukocytosis and pulmonary neutrophilia compared to WT mice. Collectively, the results suggest an essential role for IFN-gamma and nonhematopoietic TLR2 for leukocyte recruitment in response to LTA. In contrast, TLR2 on both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells appears to orchestrate an inhibitory response to S. aureus such that in complete TLR2 deficiency, there is an exaggerated proinflammatory response and/or skewing of the immune response towards a Th17 phenotype that may contribute to the decreased survival of TLR2(-/-) mice.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20306471
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9036
      1. Author :
        Hart, Emily; Azzopardi, Kristy; Taing, Heng; Graichen, Florian; Jeffery, Justine; Mayadunne, Roshan; Wickramaratna, Malsha; O'Shea, Mike; Nijagal, Brunda; Watkinson, Rebecca; O'Leary, Stephen; Finnin, Barrie; Tait, Russell; Robins-Browne, Roy
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        The Journal of antimicrobial chemotherapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        65
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bioware; Colony Count, Microbial; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Foreign Bodies; Humans; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Ofloxacin; Polymers; Prosthesis-Related Infections; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVES To assess support discs, comprising polyethylene terephthalate (PET), coated with different polymer/levofloxacin combinations for antimicrobial activity in an animal model of infection, in order to explore the use of specific polymer coatings incorporating levofloxacin as a means of reducing device-related infections. METHODS Aliphatic polyester-polyurethanes containing different ratios of poly(lactic acid) diol and poly(caprolactone) diol were prepared, blended with levofloxacin and then used to coat support discs. The in vitro levofloxacin release profiles from these discs were measured in aqueous solution. Mice were surgically implanted with the coated discs placed subcutaneously and infection was initiated by injection of 10(6) cfu of Staphylococcus aureus into the subcutaneous pocket containing the implant. After 5, 10, 20 and 30 days, the discs were removed, and the number of bacteria adhering to the implant and the residual antimicrobial activity of the discs were determined. RESULTS In vitro, the release of levofloxacin from the coated discs occurred at a constant rate and then reached a plateau at different timepoints, depending on the polymer preparation used. In vivo, none of the discs coated with polymer blends containing levofloxacin was colonized by S. aureus, whereas 94% of the discs coated with polymer alone were infected. All discs coated with levofloxacin-blended polymers displayed residual antimicrobial activity for at least 20 days post-implantation. CONCLUSIONS Bioerodable polyester-polyurethane polymer coatings containing levofloxacin can prevent bacterial colonization of implants in an intra-operative model of device-related infections.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20233779
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9035
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        1192
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Biofilms; Bioware; Bone Density Conservation Agents; Chronic Disease; Cytokines; Drug Evaluation, Preclinical; Humans; Immunity; Incidence; Jaw Diseases; Mice; Neovascularization, Physiologic; Osteoclasts; Osteomyelitis; Osteonecrosis; Staphylococcal Infections; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        The effects of antiresorptive agents (e.g., alendronate [Aln], osteoprotegerin [OPG]) on bone infection are unknown. Thus, their effects on implant-associated osteomyelitis (OM) were investigated in mice using PBS (placebo), gentamycin, and etanercept (TNFR:Fc) controls. None of the drugs affected humoral immunity, angiogenesis, or chronic infection. However, the significant (P < 0.05 vs. PBS) inhibition of cortical osteolysis and decreased draining lymph node size in Aln- and OPG-treated mice was associated with a significant (P < 0.05) increase in the incidence of high-grade infections during the establishment of OM. In contrast, the high-grade infections in TNFR:Fc-treated mice were associated with immunosuppression, as evidenced by the absence of granulomas and presence of Gram(+) biofilm in the bone marrow. Collectively, these findings indicate that although antiresorptive agents do not exacerbate chronic OM, they can increase the bacterial load during early infection by decreasing lymphatic drainage and preventing the removal of necrotic bone that harbors the bacteria.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20392222
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9034
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        184
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Amino Acid Sequence; Animals; Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides; Bacterial Infections; Bioware; Cell Line; Cells, Cultured; Chemokine CCL2; Chemokine CCL7; Chemokine CXCL1; Chemokines; Female; Humans; Interleukin-8; Leukocytes; Leukocytes, Mononuclear; Macrophages; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Molecular Sequence Data; NF-kappa B; p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases; Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases; Phosphorylation; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen29, Xen14
      12. Abstract :
        With the rapid rise in the incidence of multidrug resistant infections, there is substantial interest in host defense peptides as templates for production of new antimicrobial therapeutics. Natural peptides are multifunctional mediators of the innate immune response, with some direct antimicrobial activity and diverse immunomodulatory properties. We have previously developed an innate defense regulator (IDR) 1, with protective activity against bacterial infection mediated entirely through its effects on the immunity of the host, as a novel approach to anti-infective therapy. In this study, an immunomodulatory peptide IDR-1002 was selected from a library of bactenecin derivatives based on its substantially more potent ability to induce chemokines in human PBMCs. The enhanced chemokine induction activity of the peptide in vitro correlated with stronger protective activity in vivo in the Staphylococcus aureus-invasive infection model, with a >5-fold reduction in the protective dose in direct comparison with IDR-1. IDR-1002 also afforded protection against the Gram-negative bacterial pathogen Escherichia coli. Chemokine induction by IDR-1002 was found to be mediated through a Gi-coupled receptor and the PI3K, NF-kappaB, and MAPK signaling pathways. The protective activity of the peptide was associated with in vivo augmentation of chemokine production and recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes to the site of infection. These results highlight the importance of the chemokine induction activity of host defense peptides and demonstrate that the optimization of the ex vivo chemokine-induction properties of peptides is a promising method for the rational development of immunomodulatory IDR peptides with enhanced anti-infective activity.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20107187
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9033
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