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      1. Author :
        BitMansour, A.; Burns, S. M.; Traver, D.; Akashi, K.; Contag, C. H.; Weissman, I. L.; Brown, J. M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2002
      5. Publication :
        Blood
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        100
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Administration, Inhalation, Animals, Animals, Congenic, Aspergillosis/microbiology/*prevention & control, *Aspergillus fumigatus, Cell Lineage, Filgrastim/pharmacology, *Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, Injections, Intraperitoneal, Luminescent Measurements, Lung Diseases, Fungal/microbiology/*prevention & control, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Myeloid Progenitor Cells/physiology/*transplantation, Neutropenia/complications/drug therapy, Pseudomonas Infections/microbiology/*prevention & control, Radiation Chimera, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S., Tissue Distribution IVIS, Xenogen, Xen5
      12. Abstract :
        Myelotoxic treatments for oncologic diseases are often complicated by neutropenia, which renders patients susceptible to potentially lethal infections. In these studies of murine hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), cotransplantation of lineage-restricted progenitors known as common myeloid progenitors (CMP) and granulocyte-monocyte progenitors (GMP) protects against death following otherwise lethal challenge with either of 2 pathogens associated with neutropenia: Aspergillus fumigatus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Cotransplantation of CMP/GMP resulted in a significant and rapid increase in the absolute number of myeloid cells in the spleen, most of which were derived from the donor CMP/GMP. Despite persistent peripheral neutropenia, improved survival correlated with the measurable appearance of progenitor-derived myeloid cells in the spleen. A marked reduction or elimination of tissue pathogen load was confirmed by culture and correlated with survival. Localization of infection by P aeruginosa and extent of disease was also assessed by in vivo bioluminescent imaging using a strain of P aeruginosa engineered to constitutively express a bacterial luciferase. Imaging confirmed that transplantation with a graft containing hematopoietic stem cells and CMP/GMP reduced the bacterial load as early as 18 hours after infection. These results demonstrate that enhanced reconstitution of a tissue myeloid pool offers protection against lethal challenge with serious fungal and bacterial pathogens.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=12393415
      14. Call Number :
        136279
      15. Serial :
        7031
      1. Author :
        Echchannaoui, H.; Frei, K.; Schnell, C.; Leib, S. L.; Zimmerli, W.; Landmann, R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2002
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Infectious Diseases
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        186
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals, Ceftriaxone/therapeutic use, Cephalosporins/therapeutic use, Disease Models, Animal, Disease Susceptibility, Drosophila Proteins, Inflammation/genetics/immunology/microbiology/pathology, Listeria Infections/genetics/immunology, Listeria monocytogenes/genetics/immunology, Membrane Glycoproteins/ deficiency/genetics, Meningitis, Bacterial/ genetics/ immunology/microbiology/pathology, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Pneumococcal Infections/genetics/immunology/microbiology/pathology, Receptors, Cell Surface/ deficiency/genetics, Streptococcus pneumoniae/ immunology, Time Factors, Toll-Like Receptor 2, Toll-Like Receptors IVIS, Xenogen, Xen10
      12. Abstract :
        Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2) mediates host responses to gram-positive bacterial wall components. TLR2 function was investigated in a murine Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis model in wild-type (wt) and TLR2-deficient (TLR2(-/-)) mice. TLR2(-/-) mice showed earlier time of death than wt mice (P<.02). Plasma interleukin-6 levels and bacterial numbers in blood and peripheral organs were similar for both strains. With ceftriaxone therapy, none of the wt but 27% of the TLR2(-/-) mice died (P<.04). Beyond 3 hours after infection, TLR2(-/-) mice had higher bacterial loads in brain than did wt mice, as assessed with luciferase-tagged S. pneumoniae by means of a Xenogen-CCD (charge-coupled device) camera. After 24 h, tumor necrosis factor activity was higher in cerebrospinal fluid of TLR2(-/-) than wt mice (P<.05) and was related to increased blood-brain barrier permeability (Evans blue staining, P<.02). In conclusion, the lack of TLR2 was associated with earlier death from meningitis, which was not due to sepsis but to reduced brain bacterial clearing, followed by increased intrathecal inflammation.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12198614
      14. Call Number :
        137638
      15. Serial :
        7950
      1. Author :
        Christoph Bremer; Ching-Hsuan Tung; Ralph Weissleder
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2001
      5. Publication :
        Nature Medicine
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        7
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        near-infrared; near infrared; matrix metalloproteinase; MMP; in vivo imaging; near-infrared fluorescence imaging
      12. Abstract :
        A number of different matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors have been developed as cytostatic and anti-angiogenic agents and are currently in clinical testing. One major hurdle in assessing the efficacy of such drugs has been the inability to sense or image anti-proteinase activity directly and non-invasively in vivo. We show here that novel, biocompatible near-infrared fluorogenic MMP substrates can be used as activatable reporter probes to sense MMP activity in intact tumors in nude mice. Moreover, we show for the first time that the effect of MMP inhibition can be directly imaged using this approach within hours after initiation of treatment using the potent MMP inhibitor, prinomastat (AG3340). The developed probes, together with novel near-infrared fluorescence imaging technology will enable the detailed analysis of a number of proteinases critical for advancing the therapeutic use of clinical proteinase inhibitors.
      13. URL :
        http://www.nature.com/nm/journal/v7/n6/abs/nm0601_743.html
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4509
      1. Author :
        Rice, B W; Cable, M D; Nelson, M B
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2001
      5. Publication :
        Journal of biomedical optics
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Diagnostic Imaging; Fluorescent Dyes; Green Fluorescent Proteins; Luciferases; Luminescent Measurements; Luminescent Proteins; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Neoplasms; PC-3M-luc; Pneumonia
      12. Abstract :
        In vivo imaging of cells tagged with light-emitting probes, such as firefly luciferase or fluorescent proteins, is a powerful technology that enables a wide range of biological studies in small research animals. Reporters with emission in the red to infrared (>600 nm) are preferred due to the low absorption in tissue at these wavelengths. Modeling of photon diffusion through tissue indicates that bioluminescent cell counts as low as a few hundred can be detected subcutaneously, while approximately 10(6) cells are required to detect signals at approximately 2 cm depth in tissue. Signal-to-noise estimates show that cooled back-thinned integrating charge coupled devices (CCDs) are preferred to image-intensified CCDs for this application, mainly due to their high quantum efficiency (approximately 85%) at wavelengths >600 nm where tissue absorption is low. Instrumentation for in vivo imaging developed at Xenogen is described and several examples of images of mice with bioluminescent cells are presented.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11728202
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8984
      1. Author :
        Francis, K P; Yu, J; Bellinger-Kawahara, C; Joh, D; Hawkinson, M J; Xiao, G; Purchio, T F; Caparon, M G; Lipsitch, M; Contag, P R
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2001
      5. Publication :
        Infection and immunity
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        69
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Amoxicillin; Animals; Bioware; DNA Transposable Elements; Female; Luminescent Measurements; Lung; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Nasopharynx; Operon; Promoter Regions, Genetic; pXen-5; Streptococcus pneumoniae; Transformation, Bacterial, Xen10, Xen7
      12. Abstract :
        Animal studies with Streptococcus pneumoniae have provided valuable models for drug development. In order to monitor long-term pneumococcal infections noninvasively in living mice, a novel gram-positive lux transposon cassette, Tn4001 luxABCDE Km(r), that allows random integration of lux genes onto the bacterial chromosome was constructed. The cassette was designed so that the luxABCDE and kanamycin resistance genes were linked to form a single promoterless operon. Bioluminescence and kanamycin resistance only occur in a bacterial cell if this operon has transposed downstream of a promoter on the bacterium's chromosome. S. pneumoniae D39 was transformed with plasmid pAUL-A Tn4001 luxABCDE Km(r), and a number of highly bioluminescent colonies were recovered. Genomic DNA from the brightest D39 strain was used to transform a number of clinical S. pneumoniae isolates, and several of these strains were tested in animal models, including a pneumococcal lung infection model. Strong bioluminescent signals were seen in the lungs of the animals containing these pneumococci, allowing the course and antibiotic treatment of the infections to be readily monitored in real time in the living animals. Recovery of the bacteria from the animals showed that the bioluminescent signal corresponded to the number of CFU and that the lux construct was highly stable even after several days in vivo. We believe that this lux transposon will greatly expand the ability to evaluate drug efficacy against gram-positive bacteria in living animals using bioluminescence.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11292758
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9027
      1. Author :
        Contag, C H; Jenkins, D; Contag, P R; Negrin, R S
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2000
      5. Publication :
        Neoplasia (New York, N.Y.)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2
      8. Issue :
        1-2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Diagnostic Imaging; Genes, Reporter; Green Fluorescent Proteins; Humans; Luciferases; Luminescent Proteins; Neoplasms; PC-3M-luc; Time Factors; Tumor Cells, Cultured
      12. Abstract :
        Revealing the cellular and molecular changes associated with cancer, as they occur in intact living animal models of human neoplastic disease, holds tremendous potential for understanding disease mechanisms and elucidating effective therapies. Since light is transmitted through mammalian tissues, at a low level, optical signatures conferred on tumor cells by expression of reporter genes encoding bioluminescent and fluorescent proteins can be detected externally using sensitive photon detection systems. Expression of reporter genes, such as the bioluminescent enzyme firefly luciferase (Luc) or variants of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in transformed cells, can effectively be used to reveal molecular and cellular features of neoplasia in vivo. Tumor cell growth and regression in response to various therapies have been evaluated non-invasively in living experimental animals using these reporter genes. Detection of Luc-labeled cells in vivo was extremely sensitive with signals over background from as few as 1000 human tumor cells distributed throughout the peritoneal cavity of a mouse with linear relationships between cell number and signal intensity over five logs. GFP offers the strength of high-resolution ex vivo analyses following in vivo localization of the tumor. The dynamic range of Luc detection allows the full disease course to be monitored since disease progression from small numbers of cells to extensive disease can be assessed. As such, therapies that target minimal disease as well as those designed for late stage disease can be readily evaluated in animal models. Real time spatiotemporal analyses of tumor cell growth can reveal the dynamics of neoplastic disease, and facilitate rapid optimization of effective treatment regimens. Thus, these methods improve the predictability of animal models of human disease as study groups can be followed over time, and can accelerate the development of therapeutic strategies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10933067
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8985
      1. Author :
        Katharina Jannasch, Jeannine Missbach-Guentner and Frauke Alves
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        N/A
      5. Publication :
        Drug Discovery Today: Disease Models
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Drug Discovery
      11. Keywords :
        FMT; ProSense; in vivo imaging
      12. Abstract :
        The incidence of asthma is increasing throughout the world. Animal models are crucial for understanding the pathophysiology of asthma and for developing new therapies. Novel imaging approaches will be a powerful tool for studying asthma in animal models. This review will give a short overview of different imaging techniques that are currently used and will focus on new developments in visualization of asthma that might be used in animals as well as being translated to humans.
      13. URL :
        http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B75D8-4Y5GVHG-1&_user=10&_coverDate=02%2F28%2F2010&_rdoc=1&_fmt=high&_orig=browse&_origin=browse&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=58c3195065086c72b7aa74f13df11
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4533
      1. Author :
        Filip K. Swirski, Ralph Weissleder and Mikael J. Pittet
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        N/A
      5. Publication :
        Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        atherosclerosis; in vivo imaging; monocytes; VivoTag; FMT; fluorescence molecular tomography
      12. Abstract :
        Monocytes and macrophages play active roles in atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease that is a leading cause of death in the developed world. The prevailing paradigm states that, during human atherogenesis, monocytes accumulate in the arterial intima and differentiate into macrophages, which then ingest oxidized lipoproteins, secrete a diverse array of proinflammatory mediators, and eventually become foam cells, the key constituents of a vulnerable plaque. Yet monocytes are heterogeneous. In the mouse, one subset (Ly-6Chi) promotes inflammation, expands in hypercholesterolemic conditions, and selectively gives rise to macrophages in atheromata. A different subset (Ly-6Clo) attenuates inflammation and promotes angiogenesis and granulation tissue formation in models of tissue injury, but its role in atherosclerosis is largely unknown. In the human, monocyte heterogeneity is preserved but it is still unresolved how subsets correspond functionally. The contradistinctive properties of these cells suggest commitment for specific function before infiltrating tissue. Such commitment argues for discriminate targeting of deleterious subsets while sparing host defense and repair mechanisms. In addition to advancing our understanding of atherosclerosis, the ability to target and image monocyte subsets would allow us to evaluate drugs designed to selectively inhibit monocyte subset recruitment or function, and to stratify patients at risk for developing complications such as myocardial infarction or stroke. In this review we summarize recent advances of our understanding of the behavioral heterogeneity of monocytes during disease progression and outline emerging molecular imaging approaches to address key questions in the field.
      13. URL :
        http://atvb.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/ATVBAHA.108.180521v1
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4569