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      1. Author :
        Earley, S.; Vinegoni, C.; Dunham, J.; Gorbatov, R.; Feruglio, P. F.; Weissleder, R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        72
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense, Annexin Vivo, Annexin-Vivo, Aniline Compounds/*pharmacology; Animals; Antineoplastic Agents/*pharmacology; *Apoptosis; Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy/*physiopathology; Cell Line, Tumor; Female; Green Fluorescent Proteins; Humans; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; Mice; Mice, Nude; Mitochondrial Membranes/drug effects/*physiology; Mitochondrial Proteins/metabolism; Molecular Imaging/*methods; Pancreatic Neoplasms/drug therapy/*physiopathology; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2/antagonists & inhibitors; Recombinant Fusion Proteins/metabolism; Single-Cell Analysis; Sulfonamides/*pharmacology; Tumor Microenvironment
      12. Abstract :
        Observing drug responses in the tumor microenvironment in vivo can be technically challenging. As a result, cellular responses to molecularly targeted cancer drugs are often studied in cell culture, which does not accurately represent the behavior of cancer cells growing in vivo. Using high-resolution microscopy and fluorescently labeled genetic reporters for apoptosis, we developed an approach to visualize drug-induced cell death at single-cell resolution in vivo. Stable expression of the mitochondrial intermembrane protein IMS-RP was established in human breast and pancreatic cancer cells. Image analysis was then used to quantify release of IMS-RP into the cytoplasm upon apoptosis and irreversible mitochondrial permeabilization. Both breast and pancreatic cancer cells showed higher basal apoptotic rates in vivo than in culture. To study drug-induced apoptosis, we exposed tumor cells to navitoclax (ABT-263), an inhibitor of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Bcl-w, both in vitro and in vivo. Although the tumors responded to Bcl-2 inhibition in vivo, inducing apoptosis in around 20% of cancer cells, the observed response was much higher in cell culture. Together, our findings show an imaging technique that can be used to directly visualize cell death within the tumor microenvironment in response to drug treatment.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22505651
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 11
      15. Serial :
        10433
      1. Author :
        Fu, A.; Wilson, R. J.; Smith, B. R.; Mullenix, J.; Earhart, C.; Akin, D.; Guccione, S.; Wang, S. X.; Gambhir, S. S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        ACS Nano
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense, Animals; Cell Line, Tumor; Fluorescent Dyes/*chemistry/*diagnostic use; Glioblastoma/*pathology; Humans; Magnetic Fields; Magnetite Nanoparticles/*diagnostic use; Materials Testing; Mice; Mice, SCID; Microscopy, Fluorescence/*methods; Nanocapsules/*chemistry/ultrastructure; Particle Size
      12. Abstract :
        Early detection and targeted therapy are two major challenges in the battle against cancer. Novel imaging contrast agents and targeting approaches are greatly needed to improve the sensitivity and specificity of cancer theranostic agents. Here, we implemented a novel approach using a magnetic micromesh and biocompatible fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (FMN) to magnetically enhance cancer targeting in living subjects. This approach enables magnetic targeting of systemically administered individual FMN, containing a single 8 nm superparamagnetic iron oxide core. Using a human glioblastoma mouse model, we show that nanoparticles can be magnetically retained in both the tumor neovasculature and surrounding tumor tissues. Magnetic accumulation of nanoparticles within the neovasculature was observable by fluorescence intravital microscopy in real time. Finally, we demonstrate that such magnetically enhanced cancer targeting augments the biological functions of molecules linked to the nanoparticle surface.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22857784
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 5
      15. Serial :
        10434
      1. Author :
        Kozlowski, C.; Weimer, R. M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        7
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense, Animals; Antigens, CD/metabolism; Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic/metabolism; Calcium-Binding Proteins/metabolism; Central Nervous System/metabolism; Green Fluorescent Proteins/genetics/*metabolism; Immunohistochemistry/*methods; Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Transgenic; Microfilament Proteins/metabolism; Microglia/cytology/drug effects/*metabolism; Microscopy, Confocal/*methods; Receptors, Cytokine/genetics/metabolism; Receptors, HIV/genetics/metabolism; Reproducibility of Results
      12. Abstract :
        Microglia are specialized immune cells of the brain. Upon insult, microglia initiate a cascade of cellular responses including a characteristic change in cell morphology. To study the dynamics of microglia immune response in situ, we developed an automated image analysis method that enables the quantitative assessment of microglia activation state within tissue based solely on cell morphology. Per cell morphometric analysis of fluorescently labeled microglia is achieved through local iterative threshold segmentation, which reduces errors caused by signal-to-noise variation across large volumes. We demonstrate, utilizing systemic application of lipopolysaccharide as a model of immune challenge, that several morphological parameters, including cell perimeter length, cell roundness and soma size, quantitatively distinguish resting versus activated populations of microglia within tissue comparable to traditional immunohistochemistry methods. Furthermore, we provide proof-of-concept data that monitoring soma size enables the longitudinal assessment of microglia activation in the mouse neocortex imaged via 2-photon in vivo microscopy. The ability to quantify microglia activation automatically by shape alone allows unbiased and rapid analysis of both fixed and in vivo central nervous system tissue.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22457705
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 8
      15. Serial :
        10435
      1. Author :
        Lee, S.; Vinegoni, C.; Feruglio, P. F.; Fexon, L.; Gorbatov, R.; Pivoravov, M.; Sbarbati, A.; Nahrendorf, M.; Weissleder, R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Nat Commun
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        3
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense
      12. Abstract :
        Real-time imaging of moving organs and tissues at microscopic resolutions represents a major challenge in studying the complex biology of live animals. Here we present a technique based on a novel stabilizer setup combined with a gating acquisition algorithm for the imaging of a beating murine heart at the single-cell level. The method allows serial in vivo fluorescence imaging of the beating heart in live mice in both confocal and nonlinear modes over the course of several hours. We demonstrate the utility of this technique for in vivo optical sectioning and dual-channel time-lapse fluorescence imaging of cardiac ischaemia. The generic method could be adapted to other moving organs and thus broadly facilitate in vivo microscopic investigations.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22968700
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 7
      15. Serial :
        10436
      1. Author :
        Matsumoto, K.; Azami, T.; Otsu, A.; Takase, H.; Ishitobi, H.; Tanaka, J.; Miwa, Y.; Takahashi, S.; Ema, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Genesis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        50
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense, Animals; Blood Vessels/embryology/*physiology; Chromosomes, Artificial, Bacterial; Embryo, Mammalian; Endothelial Cells/cytology/metabolism; Endothelium, Vascular/cytology/embryology/metabolism; Female; Founder Effect; Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental; Genes, Reporter; Mice; *Mice, Transgenic; Microscopy, Fluorescence; Morphogenesis/physiology; *Neovascularization, Pathologic; *Neovascularization, Physiologic; Retina/embryology/*physiology; Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/genetics/metabolism; Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-1/genetics/*metabolism; Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2/genetics/metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        Blood vessel development and network patterning are controlled by several signaling molecules, including VEGF, FGF, TGF-ss, and Ang-1,2. Among these, the role of VEGF-A signaling in vessel morphogenesis is best understood. The biological activity of VEGF-A depends on its reaction with specific receptors Flt1 and Flk1. Roles of VEGF-A signaling in endothelial cell proliferation, migration, survival, vascular permeability, and induction of tip cell filopodia have been reported. In this study, we have generated Flt1-tdsRed BAC transgenic (Tg) mice to monitor Flt1 gene expression during vascular development. We show that tdsRed fluorescence is observed within blood vessels of adult mice and embryos, indicative of retinal angiogenesis and tumor angiogenesis. Flt1 expression recapitulated by Flt1-tdsRed BAC Tg mice overlapped well with Flk1, while Flt1 was expressed more abundantly in endothelial cells of large blood vessels such as dorsal aorta and presumptive stalk cells in retina, providing a unique model to study blood vessel development.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22489010
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 10
      15. Serial :
        10437
      1. Author :
        Rao, S. M.; Auger, J. L.; Gaillard, P.; Weissleder, R.; Wada, E.; Torres, R.; Kojima, M.; Benoist, C.; Mathis, D.; Binstadt, B. A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Arthritis Res Ther
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        14
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense, Animals; Arthritis/genetics/*immunology/metabolism; Autoantibodies/*immunology; Bone Marrow Cells/immunology/metabolism/pathology; Calcium/immunology/metabolism; Female; Male; Mast Cells/immunology/metabolism/pathology; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Inbred NOD; Mice, Knockout; Mice, Transgenic; Neuropeptides/deficiency/genetics/*immunology; Protein Isoforms/deficiency/genetics/immunology; Receptors, Neurotensin/deficiency/genetics/immunology; Receptors, Neurotransmitter/deficiency/genetics/*immunology; Spleen/immunology/metabolism/pathology
      12. Abstract :
        INTRODUCTION: Neuromedin U (NMU) is a neuropeptide with pro-inflammatory activity. The primary goal of this study was to determine if NMU promotes autoantibody-induced arthritis. Additional studies addressed the cellular source of NMU and sought to define the NMU receptor responsible for its pro-inflammatory effects. METHODS: Serum containing arthritogenic autoantibodies from K/BxN mice was used to induce arthritis in mice genetically lacking NMU. Parallel experiments examined whether NMU deficiency impacted the early mast-cell-dependent vascular leak response induced by these autoantibodies. Bone-marrow chimeric mice were generated to determine whether pro-inflammatory NMU is derived from hematopoietic cells or stromal cells. Mice lacking the known NMU receptors singly and in combination were used to determine susceptibility to serum-transferred arthritis and in vitro cellular responses to NMU. RESULTS: NMU-deficient mice developed less severe arthritis than control mice. Vascular leak was not affected by NMU deficiency. NMU expression by bone-marrow-derived cells mediated the pro-arthritogenic effect. Deficiency of all of the known NMU receptors, however, had no impact on arthritis severity and did not affect the ability of NMU to stimulate intracellular calcium flux. CONCLUSIONS: NMU-deficient mice are protected from developing autoantibody-induced inflammatory arthritis. NMU derived from hematopoietic cells, not neurons, promotes the development of autoantibody-induced inflammatory arthritis. This effect is mediated by a receptor other than the currently known NMU receptors.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22314006
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 13
      15. Serial :
        10438
      1. Author :
        Smith, B. R.; Kempen, P.; Bouley, D.; Xu, A.; Liu, Z.; Melosh, N.; Dai, H.; Sinclair, R.; Gambhir, S. S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Nano Lett
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        12
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense, Animals; *Disease Models, Animal; Ear Neoplasms/*blood supply/pathology; Humans; Mice; Microscopy, Fluorescence; Nanoparticles/*chemistry; *Nanotechnology; Nanotubes, Carbon/chemistry; Neoplasms, Experimental/*blood supply/pathology; Particle Size; Quantum Dots; Surface Properties
      12. Abstract :
        Delivery is one of the most critical obstacles confronting nanoparticle use in cancer diagnosis and therapy. For most oncological applications, nanoparticles must extravasate in order to reach tumor cells and perform their designated task. However, little understanding exists regarding the effect of nanoparticle shape on extravasation. Herein we use real-time intravital microscopic imaging to meticulously examine how two different nanoparticles behave across three different murine tumor models. The study quantitatively demonstrates that high-aspect ratio single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) display extravasational behavior surprisingly different from, and counterintuitive to, spherical nanoparticles although the nanoparticles have similar surface coatings, area, and charge. This work quantitatively indicates that nanoscale extravasational competence is highly dependent on nanoparticle geometry and is heterogeneous.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22650417
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 9
      15. Serial :
        10439
      1. Author :
        Hsieh, C. H.; Chang, H. T.; Shen, W. C.; Shyu, W. C.; Liu, R. S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Mol Imaging Biol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        14
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MMPSense, IVIS, Animals; Cell Hypoxia; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Movement; Enzyme Activation; Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases/metabolism; Gene Knockdown Techniques; Glioblastoma/*enzymology/*pathology; Humans; JNK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism; Matrix Metalloproteinase 9/metabolism; Mice; Mice, SCID; Molecular Imaging/*methods; NADPH Oxidase/*metabolism; NF-kappa B/metabolism; Neoplasm Invasiveness; Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism; Tumor Microenvironment; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        PURPOSE: We determined the impact of the cycling hypoxia tumor microenvironment on tumor cell invasion and infiltration in U87 human glioblastoma cells and investigated the underlying mechanisms using molecular bio-techniques and imaging. PROCEDURES: The invasive phenotype of U87 cells and xenografts exposed to experimentally imposed cycling hypoxic stress in vitro and in vivo was determined by the matrigel invasion assay in vitro and dual optical reporter gene imaging in vivo. RNAi-knockdown technology was utilized to study the role of the NADPH oxidase subunit 4 (Nox4) on cycling hypoxia-mediated tumor invasion. RESULTS: Cycling hypoxic stress significantly promoted tumor invasion in vitro and in vivo. However, Nox4 knockdown inhibited this effect. Nox4-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) are required for cycling hypoxia-induced invasive potential in U87 cells through the activation of NF-kappaB- and ERK-mediated stimulation of MMP-9. CONCLUSIONS: Cycling hypoxia-induced ROS via Nox4 should be considered for therapeutic targeting of tumor cell invasion and infiltration in glioblastoma.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21870211
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 5
      15. Serial :
        10461
      1. Author :
        Chen, Y.; Jacamo, R.; Shi, Y. X.; Wang, R. Y.; Battula, V. L.; Konoplev, S.; Strunk, D.; Hofmann, N. A.; Reinisch, A.; Konopleva, M.; Andreeff, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Blood
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        119
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, IVIS, Animals; Bone Marrow Cells/*cytology/metabolism/physiology; Bone Marrow Transplantation/*methods/physiology; Cells, Cultured; Cellular Microenvironment/genetics/*physiology; Hematopoiesis, Extramedullary/genetics/*physiology; Humans; Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/genetics/metabolism; Interleukin Receptor Common gamma Subunit/genetics; Mice; Mice, Inbred NOD; Mice, SCID; Mice, Transgenic; Models, Animal; Osteogenesis/genetics/physiology; Species Specificity; *Transplantation, Heterotopic
      12. Abstract :
        The interactions between hematopoietic cells and the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment play a critical role in normal and malignant hematopoiesis and drug resistance. These interactions within the BM niche are unique and could be important for developing new therapies. Here, we describe the development of extramedullary bone and bone marrow using human mesenchymal stromal cells and endothelial colony-forming cells implanted subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice. We demonstrate the engraftment of human normal and leukemic cells engraft into the human extramedullary bone marrow. When normal hematopoietic cells are engrafted into the model, only discrete areas of the BM are hypoxic, whereas leukemia engraftment results in widespread severe hypoxia, just as recently reported by us in human leukemias. Importantly, the hematopoietic cell engraftment could be altered by genetical manipulation of the bone marrow microenvironment: Extramedullary bone marrow in which hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha was knocked down in mesenchymal stromal cells by lentiviral transfer of short hairpin RNA showed significant reduction (50% +/- 6%; P = .0006) in human leukemic cell engraftment. These results highlight the potential of a novel in vivo model of human BM microenvironment that can be genetically modified. The model could be useful for the study of leukemia biology and for the development of novel therapeutic modalities aimed at modifying the hematopoietic microenvironment.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22490334
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10465