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      1. Author :
        Min, Jung-Joon; Nguyen, Vu H.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        44
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        15-24
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Cancer; Cardiology; Gene delivery vector; Gene Therapy; Imaging / Radiology; Molecular Imaging; Nuclear Medicine; Oncology; Orthopedics; Xen26
      12. Abstract :
        Cancer persists as one of the most devastating diseases in the world. Problems including metastasis and tumor resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy have seriously limited the therapeutic effects of present clinical treatments. To overcome these limitations, cancer gene therapy has been developed over the last two decades for a broad spectrum of applications, from gene replacement and knockdown to vaccination, each with different requirements for gene delivery. So far, a number of genes and delivery vectors have been investigated, and significant progress has been made with several gene therapy modalities in clinical trials. Viral vectors and synthetic liposomes have emerged as the vehicles of choice for many applications. However, both have limitations and risks that restrict gene therapy applications, including the complexity of production, limited packaging capacity, and unfavorable immunological features. While continuing to improve these vectors, it is important to investigate other options, particularly nonviral biological agents such as bacteria, bacteriophages, and bacteria-like particles. Recently, many molecular imaging techniques for safe, repeated, and high-resolution in vivo imaging of gene expression have been employed to assess vector-mediated gene expression in living subjects. In this review, molecular imaging techniques for monitoring biological gene delivery vehicles are described, and the specific use of these methods at different steps is illustrated. Linking molecular imaging to gene therapy will eventually help to develop novel gene delivery vehicles for preclinical study and support the development of future human applications.
      13. URL :
        http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13139-009-0006-3
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        10003
      1. Author :
        Curbelo, J; Moulton, K; Willard, S
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Theriogenology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        73
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Cattle; Escherichia coli; Female; Genitalia, Female; Optical Phenomena; Photons; Xen14
      12. Abstract :
        The objectives of this study were to (1) characterize the photonic properties of Escherichia coli-Xen14 and (2) conduct photonic imaging of E. coli-Xen14 within bovine reproductive tract segments (RTS) ex vivo (Bos indicus). E. coli-Xen14 was grown for 24h in Luria Bertani medium (LB), with or without kanamycin (KAN). Every 24h, for an 8-d interval, inoculums were imaged and photonic emissions (PE) collected. Inoculums were subcultured and plated daily to determine the colony forming units (CFU) and ratio of photon emitters to nonemitters. In the second objective, abattoir-derived bovine reproductive tracts (n=9) were separated into posterior and anterior vagina, cervix, uterine body, and uterine horns. Two concentrations (3.2x10(8) and 3.2x10(6) CFU/200microL for relative [High] and [Low], respectively) of E. coli-Xen14 were placed in translucent tubes for detection of PE through RTS. The CFU did not differ (P=0.31) over time with or without KAN presence; they remained stable with 99.93% and 99.98% photon emitters, respectively. However, PE were lower (P<0.0001) in cultures containing KAN than in those containing no KAN (629.8+/-117.7 vs. 3012.0+/-423.5 relative lights units per second [RLU/sec], respectively). On average, the percentage of PE between RTS, for both concentrations, was higher (P<0.05) in the uterine body. In summary, E. coli-Xen14 remained stable with respect to the proportions of photon emitters with or without KAN (used to selectively culture E. coli-Xen14). However, KAN presence suppressed photonic activity. The ability to detect PE through various segments of the reproductive tract demonstrated the feasibility of monitoring the presence of E. coli-Xen14 in the bovine reproductive tract ex vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19819541
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        10004
      1. Author :
        Sharma, Prashant K; Engels, Eefje; Van Oeveren, Wim; Ploeg, Rutger J; van Henny der Mei, C; Busscher, Henk J; Van Dam, Gooitzen M; Rakhorst, Gerhard
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Surgery
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        147
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bacteroides fragilis; Diagnostic Imaging; Disease Progression; Escherichia coli; Luciferases, Bacterial; Luminescent Agents; Male; Peritoneal Lavage; Peritonitis; Rats; Rats, Wistar; Xen14
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND Bacterial peritonitis is a life-threatening abdominal infection associated with high morbidity and mortality. The rat is a popular animal model for studying peritonitis and its treatment, but longitudinal monitoring of the progression of peritonitis in live animals has been impossible until now and thus required a large number of animals. Our objective was to develop a noninvasive in vivo imaging technique to monitor the spatiotemporal spread of bacterial peritonitis. METHODS Peritonitis was induced in 8 immunocompetent male Wistar rats by placing fibrin clots containing 5x10(8) cells of both Bacteroides fragilis (American Type Tissue Culture [ATCC)] 25,285 and bioluminescent Escherichia coli Xen14. After 1 or 2 days, infected clots were removed and open abdomen lavage was performed. In vivo bioluminescent imaging was used to monitor the spread of peritonitis. RESULTS Bioluminescent in vivo imaging showed an increase in the area of spread, and the number of E. coli tripled into the rat's abdominal cavity on day 1 after clot insertion; however, on day 2, encapsulation of the clot confined bacterial spread. Bioluminescent E. coli respread over the peritoneal cavity after lavage; within 10 days, however, in vivo imaging showed a decrease of 3-4 orders of magnitude in bacterial load. CONCLUSION Bioluminescent in vivo imaging can be effectively used to monitor the spatiotemporal behavior of the peritonitis during 3 different stages of the disease process: initiation, treatment, and follow-up. Imaging allows researchers to repeatedly image the same animal, thereby reducing variability and providing greater confidence in determining treatment efficacies for therapeutic interventions using a small number of animals.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19733882
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        10005
      1. Author :
        Adachi, T.; Kawakami, E.; Ishimaru, N.; Ochiya, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Ohuchi, H.; Tanihara, M.; Tanaka, E.; Noji, S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Dev Growth Differ
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        52
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, B16-F10-luc-G5, B16F10-luc-G5, B16-F10-luc, B16F10-luc, Animals; Base Sequence; Cell Line, Tumor; Collagen/*chemistry; DNA Primers; *Gene Silencing; Mice; RNA, Small Interfering/*administration & dosage/*chemistry; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
      12. Abstract :
        Silencing gene expression by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) has become a powerful tool for the genetic analysis of many animals. However, the rapid degradation of siRNA and the limited duration of its action in vivo have called for an efficient delivery technology. Here, we describe that siRNA complexed with a synthetic collagen poly(Pro-Hyp-Gly) (SYCOL) is resistant to nucleases and is efficiently transferred into cells in vitro and in vivo, thereby allowing long-term gene silencing in vivo. We found that the SYCOL-mediated local application of siRNA targeting myostatin, coding a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth, in mouse skeletal muscles, caused a marked increase in the muscle mass within a few weeks after application. Furthermore, in vivo administration of an anti-luciferase siRNA/SYCOL complex partially reduced luciferase expression in xenografted tumors in vivo. These results indicate a SYCOL-based non-viral delivery method could be a reliable simple approach to knockdown gene expression by RNAi in vivo as well as in vitro.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20874713
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 11
      15. Serial :
        10352
      1. Author :
        Izukuri, K.; Suzuki, K.; Yajima, N.; Ozawa, S.; Ito, S.; Kubota, E.; Hata, R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Transgenic Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        19
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals, B16-F10-luc2, B16F10-luc2; Base Sequence; Carcinoma, Lewis Lung/blood supply/genetics/immunology/therapy; Cell Line, Tumor; Chemokines, CXC/*genetics/*immunology; DNA Primers/genetics; Female; Gene Expression; Humans; Kidney/immunology; Male; Melanoma, Experimental/blood supply/genetics/immunology/therapy; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Transgenic; Neoplasm Transplantation; Neoplasms, Experimental/blood supply/genetics/*immunology/*therapy; RNA, Messenger/genetics; Recombinant Proteins/genetics/immunology; Transplantation, Heterologous
      12. Abstract :
        We reported previously that the forced expression of the chemokine BRAK, also called CXCL14 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells decreased the rate of tumor formation and size of tumor xenografts compared with mock-vector treated cells in athymic nude mice or in severe combined immunodeficiency mice. This suppression occurred even though the growth rates of these cells were the same under in vitro culture conditions, suggesting that a high expression level of the gene in tumor cells is important for the suppression of tumor establishment in vivo. The aim of this study was to determine whether CXCL14/BRAK transgenic mice show resistance to tumor cell xenografts or not. CXCL14/BRAK cDNA was introduced into male C57BL/6 J pronuclei, and 10 founder transgenic mice (Tg) were obtained. Two lines of mice expressed over 10 times higher CXCL14/BRAK protein levels (14 and 11 ng/ml plasma, respectively) than normal blood level (0.9 ng/ml plasma), without apparent abnormality. The sizes of Lewis lung carcinoma and B16 melanoma cell xenografts in Tg mice were significantly smaller than those in control wild-type mice, indicating that CXCL14/BRAK, first found as a suppressor of tumor progression of HNSCC, also suppresses the progression of a carcinoma of other tissue origin. Immunohistochemical studies showed that invasion of blood vessels into tumors was suppressed in tumor xenografts of CXCL14/BRAK Tg mice. These results indicate that CXCL14/BRAK suppressed tumor cell xenografts by functioning paracrine or endocrine fashion and that CXCL14/BRAK is a very promising molecular target for tumor suppression without side effects.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20333465
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 5
      15. Serial :
        10348
      1. Author :
        Mumprecht, V.; Honer, M.; Vigl, B.; Proulx, S. T.; Trachsel, E.; Kaspar, M.; Banziger-Tobler, N. E.; Schibli, R.; Neri, D.; Detmar, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        70
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals, B16-F10-luc2, B16F10-luc2; Antibodies, Monoclonal/diagnostic use/immunology; *Diagnostic Imaging; Female; Fluorodeoxyglucose F18/diagnostic use; Glycoproteins/*immunology; Humans; Inflammation/*complications/immunology/pathology; Iodine Radioisotopes/diagnostic use/pharmacokinetics; Luminescent Measurements; Lymph Nodes/immunology/pathology/*radionuclide imaging; *Lymphangiogenesis; Lymphatic Metastasis; Melanoma, Experimental/*complications/immunology/pathology; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Transgenic; *Positron-Emission Tomography; Prognosis; Radiopharmaceuticals/diagnostic use; Skin/metabolism; Tissue Distribution; Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor C/metabolism; Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-3/immunology
      12. Abstract :
        Metastasis to regional lymph nodes (LN) is a prognostic indicator for cancer progression. There is a great demand for sensitive and noninvasive methods to detect metastasis to LNs. Whereas conventional in vivo imaging approaches have focused on the detection of cancer cells, lymphangiogenesis within tumor-draining LNs might be the earliest sign of metastasis. In mouse models of LN lymphangiogenesis, we found that systemically injected antibodies to lymphatic epitopes accumulated in the lymphatic vasculature in tissues and LNs. Using a (124)I-labeled antibody against the lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor-1 (LYVE-1), we imaged, for the first time, inflammation- and tumor-draining LNs with expanded lymphatic networks in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET). Anti-LYVE-1 immuno-PET enabled visualization of lymphatic vessel expansion in LNs bearing metastases that were not detected by [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, which is clinically applied to detect cancer metastases. Immuno-PET with lymphatic-specific antibodies may open up new avenues for the early detection of metastasis, and the images obtained might be used as biomarkers for the progression of diseases associated with lymphangiogenesis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20978206
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10349
      1. Author :
        Proulx, S. T.; Luciani, P.; Derzsi, S.; Rinderknecht, M.; Mumprecht, V.; Leroux, J. C.; Detmar, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        70
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals, B16-F10-luc2, B16F10-luc2; Coloring Agents/administration & dosage/*diagnostic use; Indocyanine Green/administration & dosage/*diagnostic use; Injections, Intradermal; Liposomes/administration & dosage; Lymphatic Metastasis; Lymphatic Vessels/metabolism/*pathology; Melanoma, Experimental/blood supply/metabolism/*pathology; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor C/biosynthesis
      12. Abstract :
        Lymphatic vessels play a major role in cancer progression and in postsurgical lymphedema, and several new therapeutic approaches targeting lymphatics are currently being developed. Thus, there is a critical need for quantitative imaging methods to measure lymphatic flow. Indocyanine green (ICG) has been used for optical imaging of the lymphatic system, but it is unstable in solution and may rapidly enter venous capillaries after local injection. We developed a novel liposomal formulation of ICG (LP-ICG), resulting in vastly improved stability in solution and an increased fluorescence signal with a shift toward longer wavelength absorption and emission. When injected intradermally to mice, LP-ICG was specifically taken up by lymphatic vessels and allowed improved visualization of deep lymph nodes. In a genetic mouse model of lymphatic dysfunction, injection of LP-ICG showed no enhancement of draining lymph nodes and slower clearance from the injection site. In mice bearing B16 luciferase-expressing melanomas expressing vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C), sequential near-IR imaging of intradermally injected LP-ICG enabled quantification of lymphatic flow. Increased flow through draining lymph nodes was observed in mice bearing VEGF-C-expressing tumors without metastases, whereas a decreased flow pattern was seen in mice with a higher lymph node tumor burden. This new method will likely facilitate quantitative studies of lymphatic function in preclinical investigations and may also have potential for imaging of lymphedema or improved sentinel lymph detection in cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20823159
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10350
      1. Author :
        Nahrendorf, M.; Keliher, E.; Marinelli, B.; Waterman, P.; Feruglio, P. F.; Fexon, L.; Pivovarov, M.; Swirski, F. K.; Pittet, M. J.; Vinegoni, C.; Weissleder, R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        107
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Flow Cytometry; Fluorescent Dyes/*diagnostic use; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted/methods; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Nanoparticles/*diagnostic use; Neoplasms/*diagnosis; Positron-Emission Tomography/*methods; Tomography, X-Ray Computed/*methods
      12. Abstract :
        Fusion imaging of radionuclide-based molecular (PET) and structural data [x-ray computed tomography (CT)] has been firmly established. Here we show that optical measurements [fluorescence-mediated tomography (FMT)] show exquisite congruence to radionuclide measurements and that information can be seamlessly integrated and visualized. Using biocompatible nanoparticles as a generic platform (containing a (18)F isotope and a far red fluorochrome), we show good correlations between FMT and PET in probe concentration (r(2) > 0.99) and spatial signal distribution (r(2) > 0.85). Using a mouse model of cancer and different imaging probes to measure tumoral proteases, macrophage content and integrin expression simultaneously, we demonstrate the distinct tumoral locations of probes in multiple channels in vivo. The findings also suggest that FMT can serve as a surrogate modality for the screening and development of radionuclide-based imaging agents.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20385821
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 21
      15. Serial :
        10375
      1. Author :
        Snoeks, T. J.; Lowik, C. W.; Kaijzel, E. L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Angiogenesis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        13
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense,, Animals; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Fluorescent Dyes/metabolism; Genes, Reporter; Neovascularization, Pathologic/*diagnosis; *Optical Phenomena
      12. Abstract :
        In recent years, molecular imaging gained significant importance in biomedical research. Optical imaging developed into a modality which enables the visualization and quantification of all kinds of cellular processes and cancerous cell growth in small animals. Novel gene reporter mice and cell lines and the development of targeted and cleavable fluorescent “smart” probes form a powerful imaging toolbox. The development of systems collecting tomographic bioluminescence and fluorescence data enabled even more spatial accuracy and more quantitative measurements. Here we describe various bioluminescent and fluorescent gene reporter models and probes that can be used to specifically image and quantify neovascularization or the angiogenic process itself.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20449766
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 10
      15. Serial :
        10379
      1. Author :
        Tsurumi, C.; Esser, N.; Firat, E.; Gaedicke, S.; Follo, M.; Behe, M.; Elsasser-Beile, U.; Grosu, A. L.; Graeser, R.; Niedermann, G.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Antigens, CD/*biosynthesis/*metabolism; Flow Cytometry/methods; Glioma/metabolism; Glycoproteins/*biosynthesis/*metabolism; Humans; Hybridomas/metabolism; Mice; Mice, Transgenic; Models, Biological; Neoplasm Metastasis; Neoplasm Transplantation; Neoplasms/*metabolism; Neoplastic Stem Cells; Peptides/*metabolism; Recurrence
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: Cancer stem cells are thought to play a pivotal role in tumor maintenance, metastasis, tumor therapy resistance and relapse. Hence, the development of methods for non-invasive in vivo detection of cancer stem cells is of great importance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we describe successful in vivo detection of CD133/prominin, a cancer stem cell surface marker for a variety of tumor entities. The CD133-specific monoclonal antibody AC133.1 was used for quantitative fluorescence-based optical imaging of mouse xenograft models based on isogenic pairs of CD133 positive and negative cell lines. A first set consisted of wild-type U251 glioblastoma cells, which do not express CD133, and lentivirally transduced CD133-overexpressing U251 cells. A second set made use of HCT116 colon carcinoma cells, which uniformly express CD133 at levels comparable to primary glioblastoma stem cells, and a CD133-negative HCT116 derivative. Not surprisingly, visualization and quantification of CD133 in overexpressing U251 xenografts was successful; more importantly, however, significant differences were also found in matched HCT116 xenograft pairs, despite the lower CD133 expression levels. The binding of i.v.-injected AC133.1 antibodies to CD133 positive, but not negative, tumor cells isolated from xenografts was confirmed by flow cytometry. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our results show that non-invasive antibody-based in vivo imaging of tumor-associated CD133 is feasible and that CD133 antibody-based tumor targeting is efficient. This should facilitate developing clinically applicable cancer stem cell imaging methods and CD133 antibody-based therapeutics.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21187924
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 15
      15. Serial :
        10382
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