1. Resources
  2. Citations Library

Citation Details

You are viewing citation details. You can save or export citation(s) below, access an article, or start a new search.

121–130 of 499 records found matching your query:
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All

Headers act as filters

  •  
  • Records
      1. Author :
        Asai, T.; Matsushita, S.; Kenjo, E.; Tsuzuku, T.; Yonenaga, N.; Koide, H.; Hatanaka, K.; Dewa, T.; Nango, M.; Maeda, N.; Kikuchi, H.; Oku, N.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Bioconjug Chem
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        22
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals, B16-F10-luc2, B16F10-luc2; Base Sequence; Cell Line, Tumor; Cholesterol/metabolism; Ethylenediamines/*chemistry; Fibrosarcoma/metabolism/pathology; Gene Silencing; Humans; Injections, Intravenous; Liposomes/administration & dosage/chemical; synthesis/*chemistry/pharmacokinetics; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Molecular Imaging; Phosphoric Acid Esters/*chemistry; Polyethylene Glycols/chemistry; RNA, Small Interfering/genetics/*metabolism; Spectrophotometry, Infrared
      12. Abstract :
        Dicetyl phosphate-tetraethylenepentamine (DCP-TEPA) conjugate was newly synthesized and formed into liposomes for efficient siRNA delivery. Formulation of DCP-TEPA-based polycation liposomes (TEPA-PCL) complexed with siRNA was examined by performing knockdown experiments using stable EGFP-transfected HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells and siRNA for GFP. An adequate amount of DCP-TEPA in TEPA-PCL and N/P ratio of TEPA-PCL/siRNA complexes were determined based on the knockdown efficiency. Then, the biodistribution of TEPA-PCL modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) was examined in BALB/c mice. As a result, TEPA-PCL modified with PEG6000 avoided reticuloendothelial system uptake and showed long circulation in the bloodstream. On the other hand, PEGylation of TEPA-PCL/siRNA complexes caused dissociation of a portion of the siRNA from the liposomes. However, we found that the use of cholesterol-conjugated siRNA improved the interaction between TEPA-PCL and siRNA, which allowed PEGylation of TEPA-PCL/siRNA complexes without siRNA dissociation. In addition, TEPA-PCL complexed with cholesterol-conjugated siRNA showed potent knockdown efficiency in stable luciferase-transfected B16-F10 murine melanoma cells. Finally, the biodistribution of cholesterol-conjugated siRNA formulated in PEGylated TEPA-PCL was examined by performing near-infrared fluorescence imaging in Colon26 NL-17 murine carcinoma-bearing mice. Our results showed that tumor targeting with siRNA via systemic administration was achieved by using PEGylated TEPA-PCL combined with active targeting with Ala-Pro-Arg-Pro-Gly, a peptide used for targeting angiogenic endothelium.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21361311
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 7
      15. Serial :
        10347
      1. Author :
        Daugimont, L.; Vandermeulen, G.; Defresne, F.; Bouzin, C.; Mir, L. M.; Bouquet, C.; Feron, O.; Preat, V.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Eur J Pharm Biopharm
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        78
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        B16-F10-luc-G5, B16F10-luc-G5, B16-F10-luc, B16F10-luc, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: Despite the discovery of novel inhibitors of tumor angiogenesis, protein-based antiangiogenic cancer therapy suffers some limitations that antiangiogenic gene therapy could overcome. We investigated whether intra-tumoral electrotransfer of three angiogenic plasmids could inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. METHODS: Plasmids encoding recombinant disintegrin domain of ADAM-15 (RDD), thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1), and the soluble isoform of the VEGF receptor 1 (sFlt-1) were injected into B16F10 melanoma-bearing C57BL/6 mice followed by electroporation. Tumor volume was measured daily using a digital caliper. Metastasis was monitored by in vivo bioluminescence after surgical removal of the primary luciferase-encoding B16F10 tumor 5 days after intra-tumoral electrotransfer. Markers of vascularization and cell proliferation were quantified by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Intra-tumoral electrotransfer of the antiangiogenic plasmids induced a significant inhibition of tumor growth, doubling of mean survival time and long-term survivors ( approximately 40% vs 0% in control). When the tumor was removed by surgery after intra-tumoral plasmid electrotransfer, a significant decrease in tumor metastasis was observed leading to long-term tumor-free survival especially after treatment with pRDD plasmid (84% vs 0% in control). Unlike pTSP-1 and psFlt-1, pRDD significantly decreased cell proliferation in B16F10 primary tumors which express alphavbeta3 and alpha5beta1 integrins. No effect of antiangiogenic plasmid electrotransfer on normal skin blood flow was detected. CONCLUSION: The intra-tumoral electrotransfer of the three antiangiogenic plasmids is a promising method for the treatment of melanoma. The plasmid encoding RDD seems to be particularly effective due to its direct antitumoral activity combined with angiogenesis suppression, and its marked inhibition of metastasis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21316447
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 12
      15. Serial :
        10353
      1. Author :
        Defresne, F.; Bouzin, C.; Grandjean, M.; Dieu, M.; Raes, M.; Hatzopoulos, A. K.; Kupatt, C.; Feron, O.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, B16-F10-luc-G5, B16F10-luc-G5, B16-F10-luc, B16F10-luc,
      12. Abstract :
        Tumor progression is associated with the release of signaling substances from the primary tumor into the bloodstream. Tumor-derived cytokines are known to promote the mobilization and the recruitment of cells from the bone marrow, including endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). Here, we examined whether such paracrine influence could also influence the capacity of EPC to interfere with circulating metastatic cells. We therefore consecutively injected EPC pre-stimulated by tumor conditioned medium (CM-EPC) and luciferase-expressing B16 melanoma cells to mice. A net decrease in metastases spreading (vs non-stimulated EPC) led us to carry out a 2D-DIGE proteomic study to identify possible mediators of EPC-driven protection. Among 33 proteins exhibiting significant changes in expression, SPARC presented the highest induction after EPC exposure to CM. We then showed that contrary to control EPC, SPARC-silenced EPC were not able to reduce the extent of metastases when injected with B16 melanoma cells. Using adhesion tests and the hanging drop assay, we further documented that cell-cell interactions between CM-EPC and melanoma cells were promoted in a SPARC-dependent manner. This interaction led to the engulfment of melanoma cells by CM-EPC, a process prevented by SPARC silencing and mimicked by recombinant SPARC. Finally, we showed that contrary to melanoma cells, the pro-metastatic human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB231-D3H2 reduced SPARC expression in human EPC and stimulated metastases spreading. Our findings unravel the influence of tumor cells on EPC phenotypes through a SPARC-driven accentuation of macrophagic capacity associated with limitations to metastatic spread.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21616936
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10354
      1. Author :
        Emmett, M. S.; Lanati, S.; Dunn, D. B.; Stone, O. A.; Bates, D. O.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Microcirculation
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        18
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, B16-F10-luc-G5, B16F10-luc-G5, B16-F10-luc, B16F10-luc,
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVE: To determine whether chemotactic-metastasis, the preferential growth of melanomas towards areas of high lymphatic density, is CCL21/CCR7 dependent in vivo. Lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) produce the chemokine CCL21. Metastatic melanoma cells express CCR7, its receptor, and exhibit chemotactic-metastasis, whereby metastatic cells recognise and grow towards areas of higher lymphatic density. METHODS: We used two in vivo models of directional growth towards depots of LECs of melanoma cells over-expressing CCR7. Injected LEC were tracked by intravital fluorescence microscopy, and melanoma growth by bioluminescence. RESULTS: Over-expression of the chemokine receptor CCR7 enables non-metastatic tumor cells to recognise and grow towards LECs (3.9 fold compared with control), but not blood endothelial cells (0.9 fold), in vitro and in vivo in the absence of increased lymphatic clearance. Chemotactic metastasis was inhibited by a CCL21 neutralising antibody (4-17% of control). Furthermore, CCR7 expression in mouse B16 melanomas resulted in in-transit metastasis (50-100% of mice) that was less often seen with control tumors (0-50%) in vivo. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that recognition of LEC by tumors expressing receptors for lymphatic specific ligands contributes towards the identification and invasion of lymphatics by melanoma cells and provides further evidence for a chemotactic metastasis model of tumor spread.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21166932
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10355
      1. Author :
        Fu, J. Y.; Zhang, W.; Blatchford, D. R.; Tetley, L.; McConnell, G.; Dufes, C.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Control Release
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, B16-F10-luc-G5, B16F10-luc-G5, B16-F10-luc, B16F10-luc,
      12. Abstract :
        The therapeutic potential of tocotrienol, a vitamin E extract with anti-cancer properties, is hampered by its failure to specifically reach tumors after intravenous administration. In this work, we demonstrated that novel transferrin-bearing, tocopheryl-based multilamellar vesicles entrapping tocotrienol significantly improved tocotrienol uptake by cancer cells overexpressing transferrin receptors. This led to a dramatically improved therapeutic efficacy in vitro, ranging from 17-fold to 72-fold improvement depending on the cell lines, compared to the free drug. In vivo, the intravenous administration of this novel tocotrienol formulation led to complete tumor eradication for 40% of B16-F10 murine melanoma tumors and 20% of A431 human epidermoid carcinoma tumors. Animal survival was improved by more than 20days compared to controls, for the two tumor models tested. These therapeutic effects, together with the lack of toxicity, potentially make transferrin-bearing vesicles entrapping tocotrienol a highly promising therapeutic system as part as an anti-cancer therapeutic strategy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21539872
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10356
      1. Author :
        Zhou, H.; Roy, S.; Cochran, E.; Zouaoui, R.; Chu, C. L.; Duffner, J.; Zhao, G.; Smith, S.; Galcheva-Gargova, Z.; Karlgren, J.; Dussault, N.; Kwan, R. Y.; Moy, E.; Barnes, M.; Long, A.; Honan, C.; Qi, Y. W.; Shriver, Z.; Ganguly, T.; Schultes, B.; Venkataraman, G.; Kishimoto, T. K.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, 4T1-luc2
      12. Abstract :
        Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) play a key role in shaping the tumor microenvironment by presenting growth factors, cytokines, and other soluble factors that are critical for host cell recruitment and activation, as well as promoting tumor progression, metastasis, and survival. M402 is a rationally engineered, non-cytotoxic heparan sulfate (HS) mimetic, designed to inhibit multiple factors implicated in tumor-host cell interactions, including VEGF, FGF2, SDF-1alpha, P-selectin, and heparanase. A single s.c. dose of M402 effectively inhibited seeding of B16F10 murine melanoma cells to the lung in an experimental metastasis model. Fluorescent-labeled M402 demonstrated selective accumulation in the primary tumor. Immunohistological analyses of the primary tumor revealed a decrease in microvessel density in M402 treated animals, suggesting anti-angiogenesis to be one of the mechanisms involved in-vivo. M402 treatment also normalized circulating levels of myeloid derived suppressor cells in tumor bearing mice. Chronic administration of M402, alone or in combination with cisplatin or docetaxel, inhibited spontaneous metastasis and prolonged survival in an orthotopic 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma model. These data demonstrate that modulating HSPG biology represents a novel approach to target multiple factors involved in tumor progression and metastasis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21698156
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10362
      1. Author :
        Hutteman, M.; Mieog, J. S.; van der Vorst, J. R.; Dijkstra, J.; Kuppen, P. J.; van der Laan, A. M.; Tanke, H. J.; Kaijzel, E. L.; Que, I.; van de Velde, C. J.; Lowik, C. W.; Vahrmeijer, A. L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Eur J Surg Oncol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        37
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Colorectal Neoplasms/*metabolism/*secondary; Disease Models, Animal; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; Integrin alphaVbeta3/*metabolism; Intraoperative Period; Liver Neoplasms/*pathology; Male; Neoplasm Transplantation; Rats; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared/*methods; Tumor Cells, Cultured
      12. Abstract :
        AIM: Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence optical imaging is a promising technique to assess the extent of colorectal metastases during curative-intended surgery. However, NIR fluorescence imaging of liver metastases is highly challenging due to hepatic uptake and clearance of many fluorescent dyes. In the current study, the biodistribution and the ability to demarcate liver and peritoneal metastases were assessed during surgery in a syngeneic rat model of colorectal cancer using an integrin alpha(v)beta(3)-directed NIR fluorescence probe. METHODS: Liver tumors and peritoneal metastases were induced in 7 male WAG/Rij rats by subcapsular inoculation of 0.5 x 10(6) CC531 colorectal cancer rat cells into three distinct liver lobes. Intraoperative and ex vivo fluorescence measurements were performed 24 (N = 3 rats, 7 tumors) and 48 h (N = 4 rats, 9 tumors) after intravenous administration of the integrin alpha(v)beta(3)-directed NIR fluorescence probe. RESULTS: Colorectal metastases had a minimal two-fold higher NIR fluorescence signal than healthy liver tissue and other abdominal organs (p < 0.001). The tumor-to-background ratio was independent of time of imaging (24 h vs. 48 h post-injection; p = 0.31), which facilitates flexible operation planning in future clinical applications. Total fluorescence intensity was significantly correlated with the size of metastases (R(2) = 0.92 for the 24 h group, R(2) = 0.96 for the 48 h group). CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate that colorectal intra-abdominal metastases can be clearly demarcated during surgery using an integrin alpha(v)beta(3) targeting NIR fluorescence probe. Translating these findings to the clinic will have an excellent potential to substantially improve the quality of cancer surgery.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21215590
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 23
      15. Serial :
        10366
      1. Author :
        Keereweer, S.; Kerrebijn, J. D.; van Driel, P. B.; Xie, B.; Kaijzel, E. L.; Snoeks, T. J.; Que, I.; Hutteman, M.; van der Vorst, J. R.; Mieog, J. S.; Vahrmeijer, A. L.; van de Velde, C. J.; Baatenburg de Jong, R. J.; Lowik, C. W.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Mol Imaging Biol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        13
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense,Animals; Fluorescent Dyes/metabolism; Humans; Nanoparticles/diagnostic use; Optics and Photonics/*methods; Surgery, Computer-Assisted/*methods
      12. Abstract :
        In cancer surgery, intra-operative assessment of the tumor-free margin, which is critical for the prognosis of the patient, relies on the visual appearance and palpation of the tumor. Optical imaging techniques provide real-time visualization of the tumor, warranting intra-operative image-guided surgery. Within this field, imaging in the near-infrared light spectrum offers two essential advantages: increased tissue penetration of light and an increased signal-to-background-ratio of contrast agents. In this article, we review the various techniques, contrast agents, and camera systems that are currently used for image-guided surgery. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the wide range of molecular contrast agents targeting specific hallmarks of cancer and we describe perspectives on its future use in cancer surgery.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20617389
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10367
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All