1. Resources
  2. Citations Library

Citation Details

You are viewing citation details. You can save or export citation(s) below, access an article, or start a new search.

41–50 of 499 records found matching your query:
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All

Headers act as filters

      1. Author :
        Gule, N. P.; de Kwaadsteniet, M.; Cloete, T. E.; Klumperman, B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Water Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen5, Xen39, Xen26, Xen14, Xen36, Xen 5, Xen 39, Xen 26, Xen 14, Xen 36, Psuedomonas aeruginosa, S. aureus, Klebsiella, E. coli, Salmonella,
      12. Abstract :
        The 3(2H) furanone derivative 2,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone (DMHF) was investigated for its antimicrobial and cell-adhesion inhibition properties against Klebsiella pneumoniae Xen 39, Staphylococcus aureus Xen 36, Escherichia coli Xen 14, Pseudomonas aeruginosa Xen 5 and Salmonella typhimurium Xen 26. Nanofibers electrospun from solution blends of DMHF and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) were tested for their ability to inhibit surface-attachment of bacteria. Antimicrobial and adhesion inhibition activity was determined via the plate counting technique. To quantify viable but non-culturable cells and to validate the plate counting results, bioluminescence and fluorescence studies were carried out. Nanofiber production was upscaled using the bubble electrospinning technique. To ascertain that no DMHF leached into filtered water, samples of water filtered through the nanofibrous mats were analyzed using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) were used to characterize the electrospun nanofibers.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23261340
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 7
      15. Serial :
        10548
      1. Author :
        Gule, N. P.; de Kwaadsteniet, M.; Cloete, T. E.; Klumperman, B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Water Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen5, Xen39, Xen26, Xen14, Xen36, Xen 5, Xen 39, Xen 26, Xen 14, Xen 36, Psuedomonas aeruginosa, S. aureus, Klebsiella, E. coli, Salmonella,
      12. Abstract :
        The 3(2H) furanone derivative 2,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone (DMHF) was investigated for its antimicrobial and cell-adhesion inhibition properties against Klebsiella pneumoniae Xen 39, Staphylococcus aureus Xen 36, Escherichia coli Xen 14, Pseudomonas aeruginosa Xen 5 and Salmonella typhimurium Xen 26. Nanofibers electrospun from solution blends of DMHF and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) were tested for their ability to inhibit surface-attachment of bacteria. Antimicrobial and adhesion inhibition activity was determined via the plate counting technique. To quantify viable but non-culturable cells and to validate the plate counting results, bioluminescence and fluorescence studies were carried out. Nanofiber production was upscaled using the bubble electrospinning technique. To ascertain that no DMHF leached into filtered water, samples of water filtered through the nanofibrous mats were analyzed using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) were used to characterize the electrospun nanofibers.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23261340
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 8
      15. Serial :
        10549
      1. Author :
        Leszczynska, K.; Namiot, D.; Byfield, F. J.; Cruz, K.; Zendzian-Piotrowska, M.; Fein, D. E.; Savage, P. B.; Diamond, S.; McCulloch, C. A.; Janmey, P. A.; Bucki, R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Antimicrob Chemother
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen5, Xen 5, Pseudomonas aeruginosa
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVES: We aim to develop antibacterial peptide mimics resistant to protease degradation, with broad-spectrum activity at sites of infection. METHODS: The bactericidal activities of LL-37, ceragenins CSA-13, CSA-90 and CSA-92 and the spermine-conjugated dexamethasone derivative D2S were evaluated using MIC and MBC measurements. Gingival fibroblast counting, interleukin-8 (IL-8) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release from keratinocytes (HaCat) were used to determine effects on cell growth, pro-inflammatory response and toxicity. RESULTS: All tested cationic lipids showed stronger bactericidal activity than LL-37. Incubation of Staphylococcus aureus with half the MIC of LL-37 led to the appearance of bacteria resistant to its bactericidal effects, but identical incubations with CSA-13 or D2S did not produce resistant bacteria. Cathelicidin LL-37 significantly increased the total number of gingival fibroblasts, but ceragenins and D2S did not alter gingival fibroblast growth. Cationic lipids showed no toxicity to HaCat cells at concentrations resulting in bacterial killing. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that cationic lipids such as ceragenins warrant further testing as potential novel antibacterial agents.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23134677
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10551
      1. Author :
        Tanaka, M.; Mroz, P.; Dai, T.; Huang, L.; Morimoto, Y.; Kinoshita, M.; Yoshihara, Y.; Shinomiya, N.; Seki, S.; Nemoto, K.; Hamblin, M. R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2013
      5. Publication :
        Photochem Photobiol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen31, Xen 31, MRSA, S. aureus, IVIS, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        We previously reported that photodynamic therapy (PDT) using intra-articular methylene blue (MB) could be used to treat arthritis in mice caused by bioluminescent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) either in a therapeutic or in a preventative mode. PDT accumulated neutrophils into the mouse knee via activation of chemoattractants such as inflammatory cytokines or chemokines. In the present study, we asked whether PDT combined with antibiotics used for MRSA could provide added benefit in controlling the infection. We compared MB-PDT alone, systemic administration of either linezolid (LZD) alone or vancomycin (VCM) alone or the combination of PDT with either LZD or VCM. Real-time non-invasive imaging was used to serially follow the progress of the infection. PDT alone was the most effective, while LZD alone was ineffective and VCM alone showed some benefit. Surprisingly the addition of LZD or VCM reduced the therapeutic effect of PDT alone (P<0.05). Considering that PDT in this mouse model stimulates neutrophils to be antibacterial rather than actively killing the bacteria, we propose that LZD and VCM might inhibit the activation of inflammatory cytokines without eradicating the bacteria, and thereby reduce the therapeutic effect of PDT. (c) 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology (c) 2013 The American Society of Photobiology.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23311407
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10558
      1. Author :
        Strasky, Zbynek; Zemankova, Lenka; Nemeckova, Ivana; Rathouska, Jana; Wong, Ronald J; Muchova, Lucie; Subhanova, Iva; Vanikova, Jana; Vanova, Katerina; Vitek, Libor
      2. Title :
        Spirulina platensis and phycocyanobilin activate atheroprotective heme oxygenase-1: A possible implication for atherogenesis
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2013
      5. Publication :
        Food Funct.
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS Imaging
      12. Abstract :
        Spirulina platensis, a water blue-green alga, has been associated with potent biological effects, which might have important relevance in atheroprotection. We investigated whether S. platensis or phycocyanobilin (PCB), its tetrapyrrolic chromophore, can activate atheroprotective heme oxygenase-1 (Hmox1), a key enzyme in the heme catabolic pathway responsible for generation of a potent antioxidant bilirubin, in endothelial cells and in a mouse model of atherosclerosis. In vitro experiments were performed on EA.hy926 endothelial cells exposed to extracts of S. platensis or PCB. In vivo studies were performed on ApoE-deficient mice fed a cholesterol diet and S. platensis. The effect of these treatments on Hmox1, as well as other markers of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, was then investigated. Both S. platensis and PCB markedly upregulated Hmox1 in vitro, and a substantial overexpression of Hmox1 was found in aortic atherosclerotic lesions of ApoE-deficient mice fed S. platensis. In addition, S. platensis treatment led to a significant increase in Hmox1 promoter activity in the spleens of Hmox-luc transgenic mice. Furthermore, both S. platensis and PCB were able to modulate important markers of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, such as eNOS, p22 NADPH oxidase subunit, and/or VCAM-1. Both S. platensis and PCB activate atheroprotective HMOX1 in endothelial cells and S. platensis increased the expression of Hmox1 in aortic atherosclerotic lesions in ApoE-deficient mice, and also in Hmox-luc transgenic mice beyond the lipid lowering effect. Therefore, activation of HMOX1 and the heme catabolic pathway may represent an important mechanism of this food supplement for the reduction of atherosclerotic disease.
      13. URL :
        N/A
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @ 6049
      15. Serial :
        14630
      1. Author :
        Cernak, I.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Front Neurol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        1
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, RediJect Inflammation Probe, chemiluminescence, XenoLight
      12. Abstract :
        Due to complex injurious environment where multiple blast effects interact with the body parallel, blast-induced neurotrauma is a unique clinical entity induced by systemic, local, and cerebral responses. Activation of autonomous nervous system; sudden pressure increase in vital organs such as lungs and liver; and activation of neuroendocrine-immune system are among the most important mechanisms that contribute significantly to molecular changes and cascading injury mechanisms in the brain. It has been hypothesized that vagally mediated cerebral effects play a vital role in the early response to blast: this assumption has been supported by experiments where bilateral vagotomy mitigated bradycardia, hypotension, and apnea, and also prevented excessive metabolic alterations in the brain of animals exposed to blast. Clinical experience suggests specific blast-body-nervous system interactions such as (1) direct interaction with the head either through direct passage of the blast wave through the skull or by causing acceleration and/or rotation of the head; and (2) via hydraulic interaction, when the blast overpressure compresses the abdomen and chest, and transfers its kinetic energy to the body's fluid phase, initiating oscillating waves that traverse the body and reach the brain. Accumulating evidence suggests that inflammation plays important role in the pathogenesis of long-term neurological deficits due to blast. These include memory decline, motor function and balance impairments, and behavioral alterations, among others. Experiments using rigid body- or head protection in animals subjected to blast showed that head protection failed to prevent inflammation in the brain or reduce neurological deficits, whereas body protection was successful in alleviating the blast-induced functional and morphological impairments in the brain.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21206523
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10420
      1. Author :
        Tremoleda, J. L.; Khalil, M.; Gompels, L. L.; Wylezinska-Arridge, M.; Vincent, T.; Gsell, W.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        EJNMMI Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        1
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense
      12. Abstract :
        Preclinical models for musculoskeletal disorders are critical for understanding the pathogenesis of bone and joint disorders in humans and the development of effective therapies. The assessment of these models primarily relies on morphological analysis which remains time consuming and costly, requiring large numbers of animals to be tested through different stages of the disease. The implementation of preclinical imaging represents a keystone in the refinement of animal models allowing longitudinal studies and enabling a powerful, non-invasive and clinically translatable way for monitoring disease progression in real time. Our aim is to highlight examples that demonstrate the advantages and limitations of different imaging modalities including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and optical imaging. All of which are in current use in preclinical skeletal research. MRI can provide high resolution of soft tissue structures, but imaging requires comparatively long acquisition times; hence, animals require long-term anaesthesia. CT is extensively used in bone and joint disorders providing excellent spatial resolution and good contrast for bone imaging. Despite its excellent structural assessment of mineralized structures, CT does not provide in vivo functional information of ongoing biological processes. Nuclear medicine is a very promising tool for investigating functional and molecular processes in vivo with new tracers becoming available as biomarkers. The combined use of imaging modalities also holds significant potential for the assessment of disease pathogenesis in animal models of musculoskeletal disorders, minimising the use of conventional invasive methods and animal redundancy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22214535
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 15
      15. Serial :
        10477
      1. Author :
        Vujanovic, L.; Ballard, W.; Thorne, S. H.; Vujanovic, N. L.; Butterfield, L. H.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Oncoimmunology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        1
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        VivoTag, IVIS, Vivotag
      12. Abstract :
        Recombinant adenovirus-engineered dendritic cells (Ad.DC) are potent vaccines for induction of anti-viral and anti-cancer T cell immunity. The effectiveness of Ad.DC vaccines may depend on the newly described ability of Ad.DC to crosstalk with natural killer (NK) cells via cell-to-cell contact, and to mediate activation, polarization and bridging of innate and adaptive immunity. For this interaction to occur in vivo, Ad.DC must be able to attract NK cells from surrounding tissues or peripheral blood. We developed a novel live mouse imaging system-based NK-cell migration test, and demonstrated for the first time that human Ad.DC induced directional migration of human NK cells across subcutaneous tissues, indicating that Ad.DC-NK cell contact and interaction could occur in vivo. We examined the mechanism of Ad.DC-induced migration of NK cells in vitro and in vivo. Ad.DC produced multiple chemokines previously reported to recruit NK cells, including immunoregulatory CXCL10/IP-10 and proinflammatory CXCL8/IL-8. In vitro chemotaxis experiments utilizing neutralizing antibodies and recombinant human chemokines showed that CXCL10/IP-10 and CXCL8/IL-8 were critical for Ad.DC-mediated recruitment of CD56(hi)CD16(-) and CD56(lo)CD16(+) NK cells, respectively. The importance of CXCL8/IL-8 was further demonstrated in vivo. Pretreatment of mice with the neutralizing anti-CXCL8/IL-8 antibody led to significant inhibition of Ad.DC-induced migration of NK cells in vivo. These data show that Ad.DC can recruit spatially distant NK cells toward a vaccine site via specific chemokines. Therefore, an Ad.DC vaccine can likely induce interaction with endogenous NK cells via transmembrane mediators, and consequently mediate Th1 polarization and amplification of immune functions in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22754763
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10570
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All