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      1. Author :
        Goergen, C.J.; Azuma, J.; Barr, K.N.; Magdefessel, L.; Kallop, D.Y.; Gogineni, A.; Grewall, A.; Weimer, R.M.; Connolly, A.J.; Dalman, R.L.; Taylor, C.A.; Tsao, P.S.; Greve, J.M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        31
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aaa; abdominal aortic aneurysm; FX Pro Kodak molecular Imaging System; ImageJ software; in vivo imaging; jugular vein injection; mice; MMPSense 680; ProSense 750; tail vein injection; thoracic aorta; vascular
      12. Abstract :
        <AbstractText Label=“OBJECTIVE” NlmCategory=“OBJECTIVE”>To quantitatively compare aortic curvature and motion with resulting aneurysm location, direction of expansion, and pathophysiological features in experimental abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs).</AbstractText> <AbstractText Label=“METHODS AND RESULTS” NlmCategory=“RESULTS”>MRI was performed at 4.7 T with the following parameters: (1) 3D acquisition for vessel geometry and (2) 2D cardiac-gated acquisition to quantify luminal motion. Male 24-week-old mice were imaged before and after AAA formation induced by angiotensin II (AngII)-filled osmotic pump implantation or infusion of elastase. AngII-induced AAAs formed near the location of maximum abdominal aortic curvature, and the leftward direction of expansion was correlated with the direction of suprarenal aortic motion. Elastase-induced AAAs formed in a region of low vessel curvature and had no repeatable direction of expansion. AngII significantly increased mean blood pressure (22.7 mm Hg, P<0.05), whereas both models showed a significant 2-fold decrease in aortic cyclic strain (P<0.05). Differences in patterns of elastin degradation and localization of fluorescent signal from protease-activated probes were also observed.</AbstractText> <AbstractText Label=“CONCLUSIONS” NlmCategory=“CONCLUSIONS”>The direction of AngII aneurysm expansion correlated with the direction of motion, medial elastin dissection, and adventitial remodeling. Anterior infrarenal aortic motion correlated with medial elastin degradation in elastase-induced aneurysms. Results from both models suggest a relationship between aneurysm pathological features and aortic geometry and motion.</AbstractText>
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21071686
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 8450
      15. Serial :
        4803
      1. Author :
        Ranganath, Sudhir H; Fu, Yilong; Arifin, Davis Y; Kee, Irene; Zheng, Lin; Lee, How-Sung; Chow, Pierce K-H; Wang, Chi-Hwa
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Biomaterials
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        31
      8. Issue :
        19
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Bioware; Brain Neoplasms; Cell Line, Tumor; Drug Implants; Glioblastoma; Male; Metabolic Clearance Rate; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Nanostructures; Paclitaxel; Treatment Outcome; U-87 MG-luc2
      12. Abstract :
        Pharmacokinetics and therapeutic efficacy of submicron/nanoscale, intracranial implants were evaluated for treating malignant glioblastoma in mice. 9.1% (w/w) paclitaxel-loaded polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) nanofiber discs (F3) were fabricated and characterized for morphology and size distribution. Along with F3, three other formulations, 9.1% (w/w) paclitaxel-loaded PLGA submicron-fiber discs (F2), 16.7% (w/w) paclitaxel-loaded PLGA microspheres entrapped in hydrogel matrices (H80 and M80) were intracranially implanted in BALB/c mice and the coronal brain sections were analyzed for bio-distribution of paclitaxel on 14, 28 and 42 days post-implantation. BALB/c nude mice with intracranial human glioblastoma (U87 MG-luc2) were used in the therapeutic efficacy study. Animals were randomized to intracranial implantation of F3 and H80 with paclitaxel dose of 10mg/kg, placebo F3, placebo H80, weekly intratumoral injection of Taxol (10mg/kg) or no treatment and the treatment response was analyzed by bioluminescence imaging and histological (H&E, Ki-67) examinations. Enhanced, therapeutic paclitaxel penetration (approximately 1 microm) in the mouse brain up to 5mm from the implant site even after 42 days post-implantation from F3 and H80 was confirmed and deduced to be diffusion/elimination controlled. F3 and H80 demonstrated significant (approximately 30 fold) tumor inhibition and significantly low tumor proliferation index after 41 days of treatment in comparison to sham and placebo controls. The submicron/nanoscale implants are able to demonstrate optimal paclitaxel pharmacokinetics in the brain/tumor with significant tumor inhibition in a glioblastoma xenograft model in mice and hence could be potentially useful to treat highly recurrent GBM.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20350766
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8942
      1. Author :
        Sjollema, Jelmer; Sharma, Prashant K; Dijkstra, Rene J B; van Dam, Gooitzen M; van der Mei, Henny C; Engelsman, Anton F; Busscher, Henk J
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Biomaterials
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        31
      8. Issue :
        8
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Infective Agents; Bacteria; Bacterial Infections; Biocompatible Materials; Biofilms; Bioware; Coated Materials, Biocompatible; Fluorescent Dyes; Humans; Image Enhancement; Light; Luminescent Measurements; Luminescent Proteins; Microscopy, Fluorescence; Prosthesis-Related Infections; Sensitivity and Specificity; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        This review presents the current state of Bioluminescence and Fluorescent Imaging technologies (BLI and FLI) as applied to Biomaterial-Associated Infections (BAI). BLI offers the opportunity to observe the in vivo course of BAI in small animals without the need to sacrifice animals at different time points after the onset of infection. BLI is highly dependent on the bacterial cell metabolism which makes BLI a strong reporter of viable bacterial presence. Fluorescent sources are generally more stable than bioluminescent ones and specifically targeted, which renders the combination of BLI and FLI a promising tool for imaging BAI. The sensitivity and spatial resolution of both imaging tools are, however, dependent on the imaging system used and the tissue characteristics, which makes the interpretation of images, in terms of the location and shape of the illuminating source, difficult. Tomographic reconstruction of the luminescent source is possible in the most modern instruments, enabling exact localization of a colonized implant material, spreading of infecting organisms in surrounding tissue and immunological tissue reactions. BLI studies on BAI have successfully distinguished between different biomaterials with respect to the development and clearance of BAI in vivo, simultaneously reducing animal use and experimental variation. It is anticipated that bio-optical imaging will become an indispensable technology for the in vivo evaluation of antimicrobial coatings.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19969345
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9038
      1. Author :
        Sjollema, J.; Sharma, P. K.; Dijkstra, R. J.; van Dam, G. M.; van der Mei, H. C.; Engelsman, A. F.; Busscher, H. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Biomaterials
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        31
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen14, Xen 14, E. coli Xen14, IVIS, Animals; Anti-Infective Agents/*pharmacology/therapeutic use; Bacteria/*drug effects/pathogenicity; Bacterial Infections/drug therapy/*etiology; Biocompatible Materials/*adverse effects/chemistry; Biofilms; Coated Materials, Biocompatible/chemistry; Fluorescent Dyes/chemistry/metabolism; Humans; Image Enhancement/methods; Light; Luminescent Measurements/instrumentation/*methods; Luminescent Proteins/metabolism; Microscopy, Fluorescence/instrumentation/*methods; Prosthesis-Related Infections/drug therapy/microbiology; Sensitivity and Specificity
      12. Abstract :
        This review presents the current state of Bioluminescence and Fluorescent Imaging technologies (BLI and FLI) as applied to Biomaterial-Associated Infections (BAI). BLI offers the opportunity to observe the in vivo course of BAI in small animals without the need to sacrifice animals at different time points after the onset of infection. BLI is highly dependent on the bacterial cell metabolism which makes BLI a strong reporter of viable bacterial presence. Fluorescent sources are generally more stable than bioluminescent ones and specifically targeted, which renders the combination of BLI and FLI a promising tool for imaging BAI. The sensitivity and spatial resolution of both imaging tools are, however, dependent on the imaging system used and the tissue characteristics, which makes the interpretation of images, in terms of the location and shape of the illuminating source, difficult. Tomographic reconstruction of the luminescent source is possible in the most modern instruments, enabling exact localization of a colonized implant material, spreading of infecting organisms in surrounding tissue and immunological tissue reactions. BLI studies on BAI have successfully distinguished between different biomaterials with respect to the development and clearance of BAI in vivo, simultaneously reducing animal use and experimental variation. It is anticipated that bio-optical imaging will become an indispensable technology for the in vivo evaluation of antimicrobial coatings.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19969345
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 8
      15. Serial :
        10397
      1. Author :
        Kwong, G. A.; von Maltzahn, G.; Murugappan, G.; Abudayyeh, O.; Mo, S.; Papayannopoulos, I. A.; Sverdlov, D. Y.; Liu, S. B.; Warren, A. D.; Popov, Y.; Schuppan, D.; Bhatia, S. N.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Nat Biotechnol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        31
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        VivoTag, IVIS, Vivotag
      12. Abstract :
        Biomarkers are becoming increasingly important in the clinical management of complex diseases, yet our ability to discover new biomarkers remains limited by our dependence on endogenous molecules. Here we describe the development of exogenously administered 'synthetic biomarkers' composed of mass-encoded peptides conjugated to nanoparticles that leverage intrinsic features of human disease and physiology for noninvasive urinary monitoring. These protease-sensitive agents perform three functions in vivo: they target sites of disease, sample dysregulated protease activities and emit mass-encoded reporters into host urine for multiplexed detection by mass spectrometry. Using mouse models of liver fibrosis and cancer, we show that these agents can noninvasively monitor liver fibrosis and resolution without the need for invasive core biopsies and substantially improve early detection of cancer compared with current clinically used blood biomarkers. This approach of engineering synthetic biomarkers for multiplexed urinary monitoring should be broadly amenable to additional pathophysiological processes and point-of-care diagnostics.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23242163
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10567
      1. Author :
        Minakuchi, Yoshiko; Takeshita, Fumitaka; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Sasaki, Hideo; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Kouno, Makiko; Honma, Kimi; Nagahara, Shunji; Hanai, Koji; Sano, Akihiko; Kato, Takashi; Terada, Masaaki; Ochiya, Takahiro
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2004
      5. Publication :
        Nucleic acids research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        32
      8. Issue :
        13
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; B16-F10-luc-G5 cells; Bioware; Cell Division; Cell Line, Tumor; Collagen; Humans; Injections; Male; Mice; Mice, Nude; RNA Interference; RNA Stability; RNA, Small Interfering; Testicular Neoplasms; Transduction, Genetic; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Silencing gene expression by siRNAs is rapidly becoming a powerful tool for the genetic analysis of mammalian cells. However, the rapid degradation of siRNA and the limited duration of its action call for an efficient delivery technology. Accordingly, we describe here that Atelocollagen complexed with siRNA is resistant to nucleases and is efficiently transduced into cells, thereby allowing long-term gene silencing. Site-specific in vivo administration of an anti-luciferase siRNA/Atelocollagen complex reduced luciferase expression in a xenografted tumor. Furthermore, Atelocollagen-mediated transfer of siRNA in vivo showed efficient inhibition of tumor growth in an orthotopic xenograft model of a human non-seminomatous germ cell tumor. Thus, for clinical applications of siRNA, an Atelocollagen-based non-viral delivery method could be a reliable approach to achieve maximal function of siRNA in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15272050
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9003
      1. Author :
        Motohara, T.; Masuko, S.; Ishimoto, T.; Yae, T.; Onishi, N.; Muraguchi, T.; Hirao, A.; Matsuzaki, Y.; Tashiro, H.; Katabuchi, H.; Saya, H.; Nagano, O.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Carcinogenesis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        32
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Antigens, Neoplasm/genetics/metabolism; Apoptosis; Blotting, Western; Cell Adhesion; Cell Adhesion Molecules/genetics/metabolism; Cell Differentiation; Cell Movement; Cell Proliferation; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic/metabolism/*pathology; Female; Flow Cytometry; Immunoenzyme Techniques; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Neoplastic Stem Cells/metabolism/*pathology; Ovarian Neoplasms/genetics/metabolism/*pathology; Ovary/metabolism/*pathology; Peritoneal Neoplasms/genetics/metabolism/*secondary; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-myc/genetics/metabolism; Proto-Oncogene Proteins p21(ras)/genetics/metabolism; RNA, Messenger/genetics; RNA, Small Interfering/genetics; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction; Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/antagonists & inhibitors/genetics/*metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        Although the existence of tumor-initiating cells (T-ICs) in several types of human cancer has been documented, the contribution of somatic stem cells to the development of T-ICs has remained unclear. Here, we show that normal mouse ovary contains epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-expressing stem-like cells that possess the ability to differentiate into cytokeratin 8 (CK8)-expressing epithelial progeny cells. Furthermore, RNA interference-mediated transient depletion of the tumor suppressor p53 followed by retrovirus-mediated transfer of c-Myc and K-Ras oncogenes in EpCAM-expressing ovarian stem-like cells resulted in the generation of ovarian T-ICs. The established ovarian T-ICs gave rise to hierarchically organized lethal tumors in vivo and were able to undergo peritoneal metastasis. Finally, subsequent RNA interference-mediated knockdown of p53 in tumor cells triggered the expansion of EpCAM-expressing stem-like tumor cells and induced further tumor growth. These data reveal a role for p53 in the development and expansion of ovarian stem-like tumor cells and subsequent malignant progression.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21828057
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 16
      15. Serial :
        10374
      1. Author :
        Liu, W. F.; Ma, M.; Bratlie, K. M.; Dang, T. T.; Langer, R.; Anderson, D. G.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Biomaterials
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        32
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        ProSense, IVIS, Animals; Biocompatible Materials/*adverse effects; Cells, Cultured; Free Radicals/metabolism; Immunohistochemistry; Male; Mice; Prostheses and Implants/*adverse effects; Reactive Oxygen Species/*metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        The non-specific host response to implanted biomaterials is often a key challenge of medical device design. To evaluate biocompatibility, measuring the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by inflammatory cells in response to biomaterial surfaces is a well-established method. However, the detection of ROS in response to materials implanted in vivo has not yet been demonstrated. Here, we develop a bioluminescence whole animal imaging approach to observe ROS released in response to subcutaneously-implanted materials in live animals. We compared the real-time generation of ROS in response to two representative materials, polystyrene and alginate, over the course of 28 days. High levels of ROS were observed near polystyrene, but not alginate implants, and persisted throughout the course of 28 days. Histological analysis revealed that high levels of ROS correlated not only with the presence of phagocytic cells at early timepoints, but also fibrosis at later timepoints, suggesting that ROS may be involved in both the acute and chronic phase of the foreign body response. These data are the first in vivo demonstration of ROS generation in response to implanted materials, and describe a novel technique to evaluate the host response.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21146868
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10428
      1. Author :
        Derwall, M.; Malhotra, R.; Lai, C. S.; Beppu, Y.; Aikawa, E.; Seehra, J. S.; Zapol, W. M.; Bloch, K. D.; Yu, P. B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        32
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, Animals; Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology; Antioxidants/pharmacology; Atherosclerosis/etiology/genetics/metabolism/pathology/*prevention & control; Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptors, Type I/metabolism; Bone Morphogenetic Proteins/*antagonists & inhibitors/metabolism; Cardiovascular Agents/*pharmacology; Cholesterol, LDL/blood; Diet, High-Fat; Disease Models, Animal; Endothelial Cells/drug effects/metabolism; Fatty Liver/etiology/metabolism/prevention & control; Female; Hep G2 Cells; Humans; Lipoproteins, LDL/metabolism; Liver/drug effects/metabolism; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; Pyrazoles/*pharmacology; Pyrimidines/*pharmacology; Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism; Receptors, LDL/deficiency/genetics; Recombinant Fusion Proteins/metabolism; Signal Transduction/*drug effects; Time Factors; Vascular Calcification/etiology/genetics/metabolism/pathology/*prevention &; control
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVE: The expression of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) is enhanced in human atherosclerotic and calcific vascular lesions. Although genetic gain- and loss-of-function experiments in mice have supported a causal role of BMP signaling in atherosclerosis and vascular calcification, it remains uncertain whether BMP signaling might be targeted pharmacologically to ameliorate both of these processes. METHODS AND RESULTS: We tested the impact of pharmacological BMP inhibition on atherosclerosis and calcification in LDL receptor-deficient (LDLR-/-) mice. LDLR-/- mice fed a high-fat diet developed abundant vascular calcification within 20 weeks. Prolonged treatment of LDLR-/- mice with the small molecule BMP inhibitor LDN-193189 was well-tolerated and potently inhibited development of atheroma, as well as associated vascular inflammation, osteogenic activity, and calcification. Administration of recombinant BMP antagonist ALK3-Fc replicated the antiatherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory effects of LDN-193189. Treatment of human aortic endothelial cells with LDN-193189 or ALK3-Fc abrogated the production of reactive oxygen species induced by oxidized LDL, a known early event in atherogenesis. Unexpectedly, treatment of mice with LDN-193189 lowered LDL serum cholesterol by 35% and markedly decreased hepatosteatosis without inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase activity. Treatment with BMP2 increased, whereas LDN-193189 or ALK3-Fc inhibited apolipoprotein B100 secretion in HepG2 cells, suggesting that BMP signaling contributes to the regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis. CONCLUSION: These results definitively implicate BMP signaling in atherosclerosis and calcification, while uncovering a previously unidentified role for BMP signaling in LDL cholesterol metabolism. BMP inhibition may be helpful in the treatment of atherosclerosis and associated vascular calcification.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22223731
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 5
      15. Serial :
        10469
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