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      1. Author :
        Herzog, E.; Taruttis, A.; Beziere, N.; Lutich, A. A.; Razansky, D.; Ntziachristos, V.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Radiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        263
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Adenocarcinoma/*diagnosis; Animals; Colonic Neoplasms/*diagnosis; Contrast Media/pharmacokinetics; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Fluorescent Dyes/pharmacokinetics; Gold/pharmacokinetics; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; Indocyanine Green/pharmacokinetics; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental/*diagnosis; Mice; Nanoparticles; Spectrum Analysis/methods; Tomography, Optical/*methods
      12. Abstract :
        PURPOSE: To investigate whether multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT) can reveal the heterogeneous distributions of exogenous agents of interest and vascular characteristics through tumors of several millimeters in diameter in vivo. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Procedures involving animals were approved by the government of Upper Bavaria. Imaging of subcutaneous tumors in mice was performed by using an experimental MSOT setup that produces transverse images at 10 frames per second with an in-plane resolution of approximately 150 mum. To study dynamic contrast enhancement, three mice with 4T1 tumors were imaged before and immediately, 20 minutes, 4 hours, and 24 hours after systemic injection of indocyanine green (ICG). Epifluorescence imaging was used for comparison. MSOT of a targeted fluorescent agent (6 hours after injection) and hemoglobin oxygenation was performed simultaneously (4T1 tumors: n = 3). Epifluorescence of cryosections served as validation. The accumulation owing to enhanced permeability and retention in tumors (4T1 tumors: n = 4, HT29 tumors: n = 3, A2780 tumors: n = 2) was evaluated with use of long-circulating gold nanorods (before and immediately, 1 hour, 5 hours, and 24 hours after injection). Dark-field microscopy was used for validation. RESULTS: Dynamic contrast enhancement with ICG was possible. MSOT, in contrast to epifluorescence imaging, showed a heterogeneous intratumoral agent distribution. Simultaneous imaging of a targeted fluorescent agent and oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin gave functional information about tumor vasculature in addition to the related agent uptake. The accumulation of gold nanorods in tumors seen at MSOT over time also showed heterogeneous uptake. CONCLUSION: MSOT enables live high-spatial-resolution observations through tumors, producing images of distributions of fluorochromes and nanoparticles as well as tumor vasculature.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22517960
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 12
      15. Serial :
        10365
      1. Author :
        Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Kataoka, Ken; Abarzua, Fernando; Tanimoto, Ryuta; Watanabe, Masami; Murata, Hitoshi; Than, Swe Swe; Kurose, Kaoru; Kashiwakura, Yuji; Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Huh, Nam-ho
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        The Journal of biological chemistry
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        284
      8. Issue :
        21
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Adenoviridae; Animals; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Proliferation; Endoplasmic Reticulum; Fibroblasts; Humans; Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins; Interferon Regulatory Factor-1; Interleukin-7; MAP Kinase Kinase Kinase 5; Mice; Neoplasms; p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases; PC-3M-luc; Signal Transduction; STAT1 Transcription Factor
      12. Abstract :
        We previously showed that the tumor suppressor gene REIC/Dkk-3, when overexpressed by an adenovirus (Ad-REIC), exhibited a dramatic therapeutic effect on human cancers through a mechanism triggered by endoplasmic reticulum stress. Adenovirus vectors show no target cell specificity and thus may elicit unfavorable side effects through infection of normal cells even upon intra-tumoral injection. In this study, we examined possible effects of Ad-REIC on normal cells. We found that infection of normal human fibroblasts (NHF) did not cause apoptosis but induced production of interleukin (IL)-7. The induction was triggered by endoplasmic reticulum stress and mediated through IRE1alpha, ASK1, p38, and IRF-1. When Ad-REIC-infected NHF were transplanted in a mixture with untreated human prostate cancer cells, the growth of the cancer cells was significantly suppressed. Injection of an IL-7 antibody partially abrogated the suppressive effect of Ad-REIC-infected NHF. These results indicate that Ad-REIC has another arm against human cancer, an indirect host-mediated effect because of overproduction of IL-7 by mis-targeted NHF, in addition to its direct effect on cancer cells.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19279003
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8948
      1. Author :
        Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Iguchi, Haruhisa; Yoshioka, Yusuke; Takeshita, Fumitaka; Matsuki, Yasushi; Ochiya, Takahiro
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        The Journal of biological chemistry
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        285
      8. Issue :
        23
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aniline Compounds; Animals; Benzylidene Compounds; Biological Transport; Bioware; Cercopithecus aethiops; COS Cells; Culture Media, Conditioned; Exosomes; Gene Silencing; Humans; MicroRNAs; Neoplasms; PC-3M-luc; RNA Interference; RNA, Small Interfering; Sphingomyelin Phosphodiesterase; Tumor Markers, Biological
      12. Abstract :
        The existence of circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) in the blood of cancer patients has raised the possibility that miRNAs may serve as a novel diagnostic marker. However, the secretory mechanism and biological function of extracellular miRNAs remain unclear. Here, we show that miRNAs are released through a ceramide-dependent secretory machinery and that the secretory miRNAs are transferable and functional in the recipient cells. Ceramide, whose biosynthesis is regulated by neutral sphingomyelinase 2 (nSMase2), triggers secretion of small membrane vesicles called exosomes. The decreased activity of nSMase2 with a chemical inhibitor, GW4869, and a specific small interfering RNA resulted in the reduced secretion of miRNAs. Complementarily, overexpression of nSMase2 increased extracellular amounts of miRNAs. We also revealed that the endosomal sorting complex required for transport system is unnecessary for the release of miRNAs. Furthermore, a tumor-suppressive miRNA secreted via this pathway was transported between cells and exerted gene silencing in the recipient cells, thereby leading to cell growth inhibition. Our findings shed a ray of light on the physiological relevance of secretory miRNAs.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20353945
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8946
      1. Author :
        Close, P.; Gillard, M.; Ladang, A.; Jiang, Z.; Papuga, J.; Hawkes, N.; Nguyen, L.; Chapelle, J. P.; Bouillenne, F.; Svejstrup, J.; Fillet, M.; Chariot, A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Biol Chem
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        287
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, B16-F10-luc-G5, B16F10-luc-G5, B16-F10-luc, B16F10-luc, Carrier Proteins/genetics/*metabolism; Cell Line, Tumor; *Cell Movement; Gene Deletion; HEK293 Cells; Humans; Melanoma/genetics/*metabolism/pathology; Multiprotein Complexes/genetics/*metabolism; Neoplasm Invasiveness; Neoplasm Proteins/genetics/*metabolism; Proteins/genetics/*metabolism; RNA Polymerase II/genetics/metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        The Elongator complex is composed of 6 subunits (Elp1-Elp6) and promotes RNAPII transcript elongation through histone acetylation in the nucleus as well as tRNA modification in the cytoplasm. This acetyltransferase complex directly or indirectly regulates numerous biological processes ranging from exocytosis and resistance to heat shock in yeast to cell migration and neuronal differentiation in higher eukaryotes. The identity of human ELP1 through ELP4 has been reported but human ELP5 and ELP6 have remained uncharacterized. Here, we report that DERP6 (ELP5) and C3ORF75 (ELP6) encode these subunits of human Elongator. We further investigated the importance and function of these two subunits by a combination of biochemical analysis and cellular assays. Our results show that DERP6/ELP5 is required for the integrity of Elongator and directly connects ELP3 to ELP4. Importantly, the migration and tumorigenicity of melanoma-derived cells are significantly decreased upon Elongator depletion through ELP1 or ELP3. Strikingly, DERP6/ELP5 and C3ORF75/ELP6-depleted melanoma cells have similar defects, further supporting the idea that DERP6/ELP5 and C3ORF75/ELP6 are essential for Elongator function. Together, our data identify DERP6/ELP5 and C3ORF75/ELP6 as key players for migration, invasion and tumorigenicity of melanoma cells, as integral subunits of Elongator.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22854966
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 20
      15. Serial :
        10530
      1. Author :
        Kosaka, N.; Iguchi, H.; Yoshioka, Y.; Hagiwara, K.; Takeshita, F.; Ochiya, T.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Biol Chem
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        287
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        PC-3M-luc-C6, PC-3M-luc, IVIS, Bioware, Prostate cancer, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        Normal epithelial cells regulate the secretion of autocrine and paracrine factors that prevent aberrant growth of neighboring cells, leading to healthy development and normal metabolism. One reason for tumor initiation is considered to be a failure of this homeostatic cell competitive system. Here we identify tumor-suppressive microRNAs (miRNAs) secreted by normal cells as anti-proliferative signal entities. Culture supernatant of normal epithelial prostate PNT-2 cells attenuated proliferation of PC-3M-luc cells, prostate cancer cells. Global analysis of miRNA expression signature revealed that a variety of tumor-suppressive miRNAs are released from PNT-2 cells. Of these miRNAs, secretory miR-143 could induce growth inhibition exclusively in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that secretory tumor-suppressive miRNAs can act as a death signal in a cell competitive process. This study provides a novel insight into a tumor initiation mechanism.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22123823
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10537
      1. Author :
        Rahul Anil Sheth; Umar Mahmood
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        American Journal of Physiology: Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        299
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        Colorectal cancer; optical imaging; molecular imaging; cancer genetics
      12. Abstract :
        Colorectal cancer remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. The advent of molecular therapies targeted against specific, stereotyped cellular mutations that occur in this disease has ushered in new hope for treatment options. However, key questions regarding the optimal dosing schedules, dosing duration, and patient selection remain unanswered. In this review, we describe how recent advances in molecular imaging, specifically optical molecular imaging with fluorescent probes, offer potential solutions to these questions and may play a key role in improving outcomes. We begin with an overview of optical molecular imaging, including a discussion on the various methods of design for fluorescent probes and the clinically relevant imaging systems that have been built to image them. We then focus on the relevance of optical molecular imaging to colorectal cancer. We review the most recent data on how this imaging modality has been applied to the measurement of treatment efficacy for currently available as well as some as-of-yet developmental molecularly targeted therapies in animal studies. We then conclude with a discussion on how this imaging approach has already begun to be translated clinically for human use.
      13. URL :
        http://ajpgi.physiology.org/cgi/content/abstract/ajpgi.00195.2010v1
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4484
      1. Author :
        Hardy, J.; Francis, K. P.; DeBoer, M.; Chu, P.; Gibbs, K.; Contag, C. H.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2004
      5. Publication :
        Science
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        303
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        animal cell, animal model, article, bacterial colonization, bacterial growth, bacterial virulence, bioluminescence, cell culture, controlled study, extracellular space, gallbladder, in vivo study, Listeria monocytogenes, mouse, nonhuman, priority journal IVIS, Xenogen, Xen32
      12. Abstract :
        The bacterium Listeria monocytogenes can cause a life-threatening systemic illness in humans. Despite decades of progress in animal models of listeriosis, much remains unknown about the processes of infection and colonization. Here, we report that L. monocytogenes can replicate in the murine gall bladder and provide evidence that its replication there is extracellular and intraluminal. In vivo bioluminescence imaging was employed to determine the location of the infection over time in live animals, revealing strong signals from the gall bladder over a period of several days, in diseased as well as asymptomatic animals. The data suggest that L. monocytogenes may be carried in the human gall bladder.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14764883
      14. Call Number :
        138442
      15. Serial :
        6154
      1. Author :
        Zhang, J.; Preda, D. V.; Vasquez, K. O.; Morin, J.; Delaney, J.; Bao, B.; Percival, M. D.; Xu, D.; McKay, D.; Klimas, M.; Bednar, B.; Sur, C.; Gao, D. Z.; Madden, K.; Yared, W.; Rajopadhye, M.; Peterson, J. D.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Am J Physiol Renal Physiol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        303
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        F593-603
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        ReninSense 680 FAST, FMT, Animal Feed/analysis; Animals; Cathepsin D; Cathepsin G; Female; Fluorescent Dyes/*pharmacology; Humans; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Peptides/*pharmacology; Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism; Rats; Renin/*blood/*metabolism; Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology; Sensitivity and Specificity; Sodium, Dietary
      12. Abstract :
        The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is well studied for its regulation of blood pressure and fluid homeostasis, as well as for increased activity associated with a variety of diseases and conditions, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and kidney disease. The enzyme renin cleaves angiotensinogen to form angiotensin I (ANG I), which is further cleaved by angiotensin-converting enzyme to produce ANG II. Although ANG II is the main effector molecule of the RAS, renin is the rate-limiting enzyme, thus playing a pivotal role in regulating RAS activity in hypertension and organ injury processes. Our objective was to develop a near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) renin-imaging agent for noninvasive in vivo detection of renin activity as a measure of tissue RAS and in vitro plasma renin activity. We synthesized a renin-activatable agent, ReninSense 680 FAST (ReninSense), using a NIRF-quenched substrate derived from angiotensinogen that is cleaved specifically by purified mouse and rat renin enzymes to generate a fluorescent signal. This agent was assessed in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo to detect and quantify increases in plasma and kidney renin activity in sodium-sensitive inbred C57BL/6 mice maintained on a low dietary sodium and diuretic regimen. Noninvasive in vivo fluorescence molecular tomographic imaging of the ReninSense signal in the kidney detected increased renin activity in the kidneys of hyperreninemic C57BL/6 mice. The agent also effectively detected renin activity in ex vivo kidneys, kidney tissue sections, and plasma samples. This approach could provide a new tool for assessing disorders linked to altered tissue and plasma renin activity and to monitor the efficacy of therapeutic treatments.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22674025
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10572
      1. Author :
        Filip K. Swirski, Matthias Nahrendorf, Martin Etzrodt, Moritz Wildgruber, Virna Cortez-Retamozo, Peter Panizzi, Jose-Luiz Figueiredo, Rainer H. Kohler, Aleksey Chudnovskiy, Peter Waterman, Elena Aikawa, Thorsten R. Mempel, Peter Libby, Ralph Weissleder and Mikael J. Pittet
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Science
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        325
      8. Issue :
        5940
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research; Immunology
      11. Keywords :
        splenic monocytes; in vivo imaging; ProSense; FMT; fluorescence molecular tomography
      12. Abstract :
        A current paradigm states that monocytes circulate freely and patrol blood vessels but differentiate irreversibly into dendritic cells (DCs) or macrophages upon tissue entry. Here we show that bona fide undifferentiated monocytes reside in the spleen and outnumber their equivalents in circulation. The reservoir monocytes assemble in clusters in the cords of the subcapsular red pulp and are distinct from macrophages and DCs. In response to ischemic myocardial injury, splenic monocytes increase their motility, exit the spleen en masse, accumulate in injured tissue, and participate in wound healing. These observations uncover a role for the spleen as a site for storage and rapid deployment of monocytes and identify splenic monocytes as a resource that the body exploits to regulate inflammation.
      13. URL :
        http://www.sciencemag.org/content/325/5940/612.abstract
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4567
      1. Author :
        Houari Korideck; Jeffrey D. Peterson
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        329
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research; Biology
      11. Keywords :
        in vivo imaging; therapeutics; asthma; pulmonary diseases; noninvasive; infrared imaging; fluorescence molecular tomography; FMT; Fluorescence Imaging Agents
      12. Abstract :
        Animal models of pulmonary inflammation are critical for understanding the pathophysiology of asthma and for developing new therapies. Current conventional assessments in mouse models of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease rely on invasive measures of pulmonary function and terminal characterization of cells infiltrating into the lung. The ability to noninvasively visualize and quantify the underlying biological processes in mouse pulmonary models in vivo would provide a significant advance in characterizing disease processes and the effects of therapeutics. We report the utility of near-infrared imaging agents, in combination with fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) imaging, for the noninvasive quantitative imaging of mouse lung inflammation in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced chronic asthma model. BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally sensitized with OVA-Alum (aluminum hydroxide) at days 0 and 14, followed by daily intranasal challenge with OVA in phosphate-buffered saline from days 21 to 24. Dexamethasone and control therapies were given intraperitoneally 4 h before each intranasal inhalation of OVA from days 21 to 24. Twenty-four hours before imaging, the mice were injected intravenously with 5 nmol of the cathepsin-activatable fluorescent agent, ProSense 680. Quantification by FMT revealed in vivo cysteine protease activity within the lung associated with the inflammatory eosinophilia, which decreased in response to dexamethasone treatment. Results were correlated with in vitro laboratory tests (bronchoalveolar lavage cell analysis and immunohistochemistry) and revealed good correlation between these measures and quantification of ProSense 680 activation. We have demonstrated the ability of FMT to noninvasively visualize and quantify inflammation in the lung and monitor therapeutic efficacy in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://jpet.aspetjournals.org/content/329/3/882.full
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4473
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