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      1. Author :
        Cirstoiu-Hapca, A; Buchegger, F; Lange, N; Bossy, L; Gurny, R; Delie, F
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Journal of controlled release: official journal of the Controlled Release Society
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        144
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antibodies, Monoclonal; Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Drug Carriers; Female; Humans; Mice; Nanoparticles; Ovarian Neoplasms; Paclitaxel; Receptor, erbB-2; SKOV3-luc-D3 cells; Tissue Distribution; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        The benefit of polymeric immuno-nanoparticles (NPs-Tx-HER), consisting of paclitaxel (Tx)-loaded nanoparticles coated with anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies (Herceptin, trastuzumab), in cancer treatment was assessed in a disseminated xenograft ovarian cancer model induced by intraperitoneal inoculation of SKOV-3 cells overexpressing HER2 antigens. The study was focused on the evaluation of therapeutic efficacy and biodistribution of NPs-Tx-HER compared to other Tx formulations. The therapeutic efficacy was determined by two methods: bioluminescence imaging and survival rate. The treatment regimen consisted in an initial dose of 20mg/kg Tx administered as 10mg/kg intravenously (IV) and 10mg/kg intraperitonealy (IP), followed by five alternative IP and IV injections of 10mg/kg Tx every 3 days. The bioluminescence study has clearly shown the superior anti-tumor activity of NPs-Tx-HER compared to free Tx. As a confirmation of these results, a significantly longer survival of mice was observed for NPs-Tx-HER treatment compared to free Tx, Tx-loaded nanoparticles coated with an irrelevant mAb (Mabthera, rituximab) or Herceptin alone, indicating the potential of immuno-nanoparticles in cancer treatment. The biodistribution pattern of Tx was assessed on healthy and tumor bearing mice after IV or IP administration. An equivalent biodistribution profile was observed in healthy mice for Tx encapsulated either in uncoated nanoparticles (NPs-Tx) or in NPs-Tx-HER. No significant difference in Tx biodistribution was observed after IV or IP injection, except for a lower accumulation in the lungs when NPs were administered by IP. Encapsulated Tx accumulated in the organs of the reticulo-endothelial system (RES) such as the liver and spleen, whereas free Tx had a non-specific distribution in all tested organs. Compared to free Tx, the single dose injection (IV or IP) of encapsulated Tx in mice bearing tumors induced a higher tumor accumulation. However, no difference in overall tumor accumulation between NPs-Tx-HER and NPs-Tx was observed. In conclusion, the encapsulation of Tx into NPs-Tx-HER immuno-nanoparticles resulted in an improved efficacy of drug in the treatment of disseminated ovarian cancer overexpressing HER2 receptors.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20219607
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9012
      1. Author :
        Sharma, Prashant K; Engels, Eefje; Van Oeveren, Wim; Ploeg, Rutger J; van Henny der Mei, C; Busscher, Henk J; Van Dam, Gooitzen M; Rakhorst, Gerhard
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Surgery
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        147
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bacteroides fragilis; Diagnostic Imaging; Disease Progression; Escherichia coli; Luciferases, Bacterial; Luminescent Agents; Male; Peritoneal Lavage; Peritonitis; Rats; Rats, Wistar; Xen14
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND Bacterial peritonitis is a life-threatening abdominal infection associated with high morbidity and mortality. The rat is a popular animal model for studying peritonitis and its treatment, but longitudinal monitoring of the progression of peritonitis in live animals has been impossible until now and thus required a large number of animals. Our objective was to develop a noninvasive in vivo imaging technique to monitor the spatiotemporal spread of bacterial peritonitis. METHODS Peritonitis was induced in 8 immunocompetent male Wistar rats by placing fibrin clots containing 5x10(8) cells of both Bacteroides fragilis (American Type Tissue Culture [ATCC)] 25,285 and bioluminescent Escherichia coli Xen14. After 1 or 2 days, infected clots were removed and open abdomen lavage was performed. In vivo bioluminescent imaging was used to monitor the spread of peritonitis. RESULTS Bioluminescent in vivo imaging showed an increase in the area of spread, and the number of E. coli tripled into the rat's abdominal cavity on day 1 after clot insertion; however, on day 2, encapsulation of the clot confined bacterial spread. Bioluminescent E. coli respread over the peritoneal cavity after lavage; within 10 days, however, in vivo imaging showed a decrease of 3-4 orders of magnitude in bacterial load. CONCLUSION Bioluminescent in vivo imaging can be effectively used to monitor the spatiotemporal behavior of the peritonitis during 3 different stages of the disease process: initiation, treatment, and follow-up. Imaging allows researchers to repeatedly image the same animal, thereby reducing variability and providing greater confidence in determining treatment efficacies for therapeutic interventions using a small number of animals.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19733882
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        10005
      1. Author :
        Sharma, P. K.; Engels, E.; Van Oeveren, W.; Ploeg, R. J.; van Henny der Mei, C.; Busscher, H. J.; Van Dam, G. M.; Rakhorst, G.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Surgery
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        147
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen14, Xen 14, E. coli Xen14, IVIS, Animals; Bacteroides fragilis/*isolation & purification; Diagnostic Imaging/methods; Disease Progression; Escherichia coli/*isolation & purification; Luciferases, Bacterial/*diagnostic use; Luminescent Agents/*diagnostic use; Male; Peritoneal Lavage; Peritonitis/*microbiology/pathology/therapy; Rats; Rats, Wistar
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: Bacterial peritonitis is a life-threatening abdominal infection associated with high morbidity and mortality. The rat is a popular animal model for studying peritonitis and its treatment, but longitudinal monitoring of the progression of peritonitis in live animals has been impossible until now and thus required a large number of animals. Our objective was to develop a noninvasive in vivo imaging technique to monitor the spatiotemporal spread of bacterial peritonitis. METHODS: Peritonitis was induced in 8 immunocompetent male Wistar rats by placing fibrin clots containing 5x10(8) cells of both Bacteroides fragilis (American Type Tissue Culture [ATCC)] 25,285 and bioluminescent Escherichia coli Xen14. After 1 or 2 days, infected clots were removed and open abdomen lavage was performed. In vivo bioluminescent imaging was used to monitor the spread of peritonitis. RESULTS: Bioluminescent in vivo imaging showed an increase in the area of spread, and the number of E. coli tripled into the rat's abdominal cavity on day 1 after clot insertion; however, on day 2, encapsulation of the clot confined bacterial spread. Bioluminescent E. coli respread over the peritoneal cavity after lavage; within 10 days, however, in vivo imaging showed a decrease of 3-4 orders of magnitude in bacterial load. CONCLUSION: Bioluminescent in vivo imaging can be effectively used to monitor the spatiotemporal behavior of the peritonitis during 3 different stages of the disease process: initiation, treatment, and follow-up. Imaging allows researchers to repeatedly image the same animal, thereby reducing variability and providing greater confidence in determining treatment efficacies for therapeutic interventions using a small number of animals.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19733882
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 7
      15. Serial :
        10396
      1. Author :
        Balibar, Carl J; Shen, Xiaoyu; McGuire, Dorothy; Yu, Donghui; McKenney, David; Tao, Jianshi
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Microbiology (Reading, England)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        156
      8. Issue :
        Pt 5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bacterial Proteins; Bacteriolysis; Bioware; Cell Wall; Gene Expression Profiling; Gene Knockout Techniques; Genes, Reporter; Lysostaphin; Mice; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Sepsis; Staphylococcus aureus; Virulence; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Transcriptional profiling data accumulated in recent years for the clinically relevant pathogen Staphylococcus aureus have established a cell wall stress stimulon, which comprises a coordinately regulated set of genes that are upregulated in response to blockage of cell wall biogenesis. In particular, the expression of cwrA (SA2343, N315 notation), which encodes a putative 63 amino acid polypeptide of unknown biological function, increases over 100-fold in response to cell wall inhibition. Herein, we seek to understand the biological role that this gene plays in S. aureus. cwrA was found to be robustly induced by all cell wall-targeting antibiotics tested – vancomycin, oxacillin, penicillin G, phosphomycin, imipenem, hymeglusin and bacitracin – but not by antibiotics with other mechanisms of action, including ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, triclosan, rifampicin, novobiocin and carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone. Although a DeltacwrA S. aureus strain had no appreciable shift in MICs for cell wall-targeting antibiotics, the knockout was shown to have reduced cell wall integrity in a variety of other assays. Additionally, the gene was shown to be important for virulence in a mouse sepsis model of infection.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20167623
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9037
      1. Author :
        Alsaadi, M.; Italia, J. L.; Mullen, A. B.; Ravi Kumar, M. N.; Candlish, A. A.; Williams, R. A.; Shaw, C. D.; Al Gawhari, F.; Coombs, G. H.; Wiese, M.; Thomson, A. H.; Puig-Sellart, M.; Wallace, J.; Sharp, A.; Wheeler, L.; Warn, P.; Carter, K. C.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Control Release
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        160
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, B16-F10-luc-G5, B16F10-luc-G5, B16-F10-luc, B16F10-luc, Aerosols; Amphotericin B/*administration & dosage; Animals; Antifungal Agents/*administration & dosage; Cricetinae; Disease Models, Animal; Drug Carriers/*administration & dosage; Female; Firefly Luciferin/administration & dosage; Leishmaniasis/*drug therapy/metabolism/microbiology; Liver/metabolism/microbiology; Lung/metabolism/microbiology; Mesocricetus; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Pulmonary Aspergillosis/*drug therapy/metabolism/microbiology; Rats; Rats, Sprague-Dawley; Surface-Active Agents/*administration & dosage
      12. Abstract :
        Amphotericin B (AMB) is used to treat both fungal and leishmanial infections, which are of major significance to human health. Clinical use of free AMB is limited by its nephrotoxicity, whereas liposomal AMB is costly and requires parenteral administration, thus development of novel formulations with enhanced efficacy, minimal toxicity and that can be applied via non-invasive routes is required. In this study we analysed the potential of non-ionic surfactant vesicles (NIV) given by nebulisation to deliver AMB to the lungs, liver and skin. Treatment with AMB-NIV resulted in significantly higher drug levels in the lungs and skin (p<0.05) compared to similar treatment with AMB solution but significantly lower plasma levels (p<0.05). Treatment with AMB-NIV resulted in a significant reduction in fungal lung burdens in a rat model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (p<0.05) compared to treatment with the carrier alone. Treatment with AMB-NIV but not AMB solution significantly suppressed Leishmania donovani liver parasite burdens (p<0.05) but could not inhibit the growth of cutaneous Leishmania major lesions. The results of this study indicate that aerosolised NIV enhanced pulmonary and hepatic delivery whilst minimising systemic exposure and toxicity.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22516093
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 15
      15. Serial :
        10528
      1. Author :
        Park, Hae-Sun; Francis, Kevin P; Yu, Jun; Cleary, P Patrick
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2003
      5. Publication :
        Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        171
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Administration, Intranasal; Animals; Bioware; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Humans; Immunohistochemistry; Intracellular Fluid; Lymphoid Tissue; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Nasal Mucosa; Nasopharynx; Palatine Tonsil; pXen-5; Streptococcal Infections; Streptococcus pyogenes
      12. Abstract :
        Human tonsils are suspected to be an antibiotic-impervious human reservoir for group A streptococcus. An intranasal infection model in mice and a bioluminescent-tagged strain were used to investigate this possibility. Viable streptococci were predominantly found both intra- and extracellularly in nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT), a human tonsil homologue. Ulex europaeus-1, a membranous (M) cell-specific lectin, identified cells harboring streptococci at the epithelial surface of NALT and blocked bacterial colonization of this tissue. These results suggest that M cells in NALT transport this Gram-positive pathogen across the epithelial layers in a manner similar to those in Peyer's patches, which permit enteric pathogens to invade deeper tissues from the gastrointestinal tract.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12928403
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9025
      1. Author :
        Sadikot, Ruxana T; Zeng, Heng; Yull, Fiona E; Li, Bo; Cheng, Dong-sheng; Kernodle, Douglas S; Jansen, E Duco; Contag, Christopher H; Segal, Brahm H; Holland, Steven M; Blackwell, Timothy S; Christman, John W
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2004
      5. Publication :
        Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        172
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Cells, Cultured; Dose-Response Relationship, Immunologic; Immunity, Innate; Lung; Macrophages; Membrane Glycoproteins; Mice; Mice, Inbred C3H; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Inbred DBA; Mice, Transgenic; NADPH Oxidase; Neutrophil Infiltration; NF-kappa B; Phosphoproteins; Pneumonia, Bacterial; Pseudomonas Infections; Receptors, Cell Surface; Signal Transduction; Toll-Like Receptors; Xen5
      12. Abstract :
        We examined the role of redox signaling generated by NADPH oxidase in activation of NF-kappaB and host defense against Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Using mice with an NF-kappaB-driven luciferase reporter construct (HIV-LTR/luciferase (HLL)), we found that intratracheal administration of P. aeruginosa resulted in a dose-dependent neutrophilic influx and activation of NF-kappaB. To determine the effects of reactive oxygen species generated by the NADPH oxidase system on activation of NF-kappaB, we crossbred mice deficient in p47(phox) with NF-kappaB reporter mice (p47(phox-/-)HLL). These p47(phox-/-)HLL mice were unable to activate NF-kappaB to the same degree as HLL mice with intact NADPH oxidase following P. aeruginosa infection. In addition, lung TNF-alpha levels were significantly lower in p47(phox-/-)HLL mice compared with HLL mice. Bacterial clearance was impaired in p47(phox-/-)HLL mice. In vitro studies using bone marrow-derived macrophages showed that Toll-like receptor 4 was necessary for NF-kappaB activation following treatment with P. aeruginosa. Additional studies with macrophages from p47(phox-/-) mice confirmed that redox signaling was necessary for maximal Toll-like receptor 4-dependent NF-kappaB activation in this model. These data indicate that the NADPH oxidase-dependent respiratory burst stimulated by Pseudomonas infection contributes to host defense by modulating redox-dependent signaling through the NF-kappaB pathway.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14734763
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9999
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        175
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Cattle; Cells, Cultured; Cystic Fibrosis; Flavoproteins; Humans; Hydrogen peroxide; Immunity, Innate; Immunity, Mucosal; Lactoperoxidase; Lung Diseases; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Rats; Reactive Oxygen Species; Respiratory Mucosa; RNA, Small Interfering; Staphylococcus aureus; Thiocyanates; Trachea; Xen8.1
      12. Abstract :
        RATIONALE The respiratory tract is constantly exposed to airborne microorganisms. Nevertheless, normal airways remain sterile without recruiting phagocytes. This innate immune activity has been attributed to mucociliary clearance and antimicrobial polypeptides of airway surface liquid. Defective airway immunity characterizes cystic fibrosis (CF), a disease caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator, a chloride channel. The pathophysiology of defective immunity in CF remains to be elucidated. OBJECTIVE We investigated the ability of non-CF and CF airway epithelia to kill bacteria through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). METHODS ROS production and ROS-mediated bactericidal activity were determined on the apical surfaces of human and rat airway epithelia and on cow tracheal explants. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Dual oxidase enzyme of airway epithelial cells generated sufficient H(2)O(2) to support production of bactericidal hypothiocyanite (OSCN(-)) in the presence of airway surface liquid components lactoperoxidase and thiocyanate (SCN(-)). This OSCN(-) formation eliminated Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa on airway mucosal surfaces, whereas it was nontoxic to the host. In contrast to normal epithelia, CF epithelia failed to secrete SCN(-), thereby rendering the oxidative antimicrobial system inactive. CONCLUSIONS These data indicate a novel innate defense mechanism of airways that kills bacteria via ROS and suggest a new cellular and molecular basis for defective airway immunity in CF.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17082494
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9988
      1. Author :
        Kirby, A. C.; Beattie, L.; Maroof, A.; Rooijen, N. van; Kaye, P. M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        American Journal of Pathology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        175
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen, Xen10
      12. Abstract :
        Marginal zone macrophages in the murine spleen play an important role in the capture of blood-borne pathogens and are viewed as an essential component of host defense against the development of pneumococcal sepsis. However, we and others have previously described the loss of marginal zone macrophages associated with the splenomegaly that follows a variety of viral and protozoal infections; this finding raises the question of whether these infected mice would become more susceptible to secondary pneumococcal infection. Contrary to expectations, we found that mice lacking marginal zone macrophages resulting from Leishmania donovani infection have increased resistance to Streptococcus pneumoniae type 3 and do not develop sepsis. Using biophotonic imaging, we observed that pneumococci are rapidly trapped in the spleens of L. donovani-infected mice. By selective depletion studies using clodronate liposomes, depleting monoclonal antibodies specific for Ly6C/G and Ly6G, and CD11c-DTR mice, we show that the enhanced early resistance in L. donovani-infected mice is entirely due to the activity of SIGNR1? red pulp macrophages. Our data demonstrate, therefore, that the normal requirement for SIGNR1+ marginal zone macrophages to protect against a primary pneumococcal infection can, under conditions of splenomegaly, be readily compensated for by activated red pulp macrophages.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19644016
      14. Call Number :
        139699
      15. Serial :
        7610
      1. Author :
        Xie, Chao; Liang, Bojian; Xue, Ming; Lin, Angela S.P.; Loiselle, Alayna; Schwarz, Edward M.; Guldberg, Robert E.; O'Keefe, Regis J.; Zhang, Xinping
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Am J Pathol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        175
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen10, Xen 10, Streptococcus pneumoniae Xen10, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        Although the essential role of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in fracture healing is known, the targeted genes and molecular pathways remain unclear. Using prostaglandin E2 receptor (EP)2 and EP4 agonists, we examined the effects of EP receptor activation in compensation for the lack of COX-2 during fracture healing. In a fracture-healing model, COX-2-/- mice showed delayed initiation and impaired endochondral bone repair, accompanied by a severe angiogenesis deficiency. The EP4 agonist markedly improved the impaired healing in COX-2-/- mice, as evidenced by restoration of bony callus formation on day 14, a near complete reversal of bone formation, and an approximately 70% improvement of angiogenesis in the COX-2-/- callus. In comparison, the EP2 agonist only marginally enhanced bone formation in COX-2-/- mice. To determine the differential roles of EP2 and EP4 receptors on COX-2-mediated fracture repair, the effects of selective EP agonists on chondrogenesis were examined in E11.5 long-term limb bud micromass cultures. Only the EP4 agonist significantly increased cartilage nodule formation similar to that observed during prostaglandin E2 treatment. The prostaglandin E2/EP4 agonist also stimulated MMP-9 expression in bone marrow stromal cell cultures. The EP4 agonist further restored the reduction of MMP-9 expression in the COX-2-/- fracture callus. Taken together, our studies demonstrate that EP2 and EP4 have differential functions during endochondral bone repair. Activation of EP4, but not EP2 rescued impaired bone fracture healing in COX-2-/- mice.
      13. URL :
        http://ajp.amjpathol.org/cgi/content/abstract/175/2/772
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10401
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