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      1. Author :
        Xing, Yifei; Lu, Xiaochun; Pua, Eric C; Zhong, Pei
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Biochemical and biophysical research communications
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        375
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; B16-F10-luc-G5 cells; Bioware; Cytotoxicity Tests, Immunologic; Female; Melanoma, Experimental; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Neoplasm Metastasis; Ultrasonic Therapy
      12. Abstract :
        This study aims to assess the risk of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy on the incidence of distant metastases and to investigate its association with HIFU-elicited anti-tumor immunity in a murine melanoma (B16-F10) model. Tumor-bearing legs were amputated immediately after or 2 days following HIFU treatment to differentiate the contribution of the elicited anti-tumor immunity. In mice undergoing amputation immediately after mechanical, thermal, or no HIFU treatment, metastasis rates were comparable (18.8%, 13.3%, and 12.5%). In contrast, with a 2-day delay in amputation, the corresponding metastasis rates were 6.7%, 11.8%, and 40%, respectively. Animal survival rate was higher and CTL activity was enhanced in the HIFU treatment groups. Altogether, our results suggest that HIFU treatment does not increase the risk of distant metastasis. Instead, HIFU treatment can elicit an anti-tumor immune response that may be harnessed to improve the overall effectiveness and quality of cancer therapy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18727919
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8998
      1. Author :
        Baoum, A.; Ovcharenko, D.; Berkland, C.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Int J Pharm
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        427
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        A549-luc-C8, A549-luc, IVIS, Bioware, Calcium/chemistry; Cell Line; Cell-Penetrating Peptides/administration & dosage/*chemistry; Drug Carriers/administration & dosage/adverse effects/*chemistry; *Gene Silencing; Genetic Therapy/*methods; Humans; Luciferases; Nanoparticles/administration & dosage/chemistry; RNA, Small Interfering/*administration & dosage/chemistry; Tissue Distribution
      12. Abstract :
        The development of short-interfering RNA (siRNA) offers new strategies for manipulating specific genes responsible for pathological disorders. Myriad cationic polymer and lipid formulations have been explored, but an effective, non-toxic carrier remains a major barrier to clinical translation. Among the emerging candidates for siRNA carriers are cell penetrating peptides (CPPs), which can traverse the plasma membrane and facilitate the intracellular delivery of siRNA. Previously, a highly efficient and non-cytotoxic means of gene delivery was designed by complexing plasmid DNA with CPPs, then condensing with calcium. Here, the CPP TAT and a longer, 'double' TAT (dTAT) were investigated as potential carriers for siRNA. Various N/P ratios and calcium concentrations were used to optimize siRNA complexes in vitro. Upon addition of calcium, 'loose' siRNA/CPP complexes were condensed into small nanoparticles. Knockdown of luciferase expression in the human epithelial lung cell line A549-luc-C8 was high (up to 93%) with no evidence of cytotoxicity. Selected formulations of the dTAT complexes were dosed intravenously up to 1000 mg/kg with minimal toxicity. Biodistribution studies revealed high levels of gene knockdown in the lung and muscle tissue suggesting these simple vectors may offer a translatable approach to siRNA delivery.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21856394
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 9
      15. Serial :
        10519
      1. Author :
        Kadurugamuwa, J. L.; Francis, K. P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Methods in Molecular Biology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        431
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Bioware, Xen29, Animals, Bacteria/chemistry/ genetics, Bacterial Infections/diagnosis/ microbiology, Biofilms/ growth & development, Diagnostic Imaging/methods, Luminescent Measurements/ methods IVIS, Xenogen, Xen5, Xen44
      12. Abstract :
        Whole body biophotonic imaging (BPI) is a technique that has contributed significantly to the way researchers study bacterial pathogens and develop pre-clinical treatments to combat their ensuing infections in vivo. Not only does this approach allow disease profiles and drug efficacy studies to be conducted non-destructively in live animals over the entire course of the disease, but in many cases, it enables investigators to observe disease profiles that could otherwise easily be missed using conventional methodologies. The principles of this technique are that bacterial pathogens engineered to express bioluminescence (visible light) can be readily monitored from outside of the living animal using specialized low-light imaging equipment, enabling their movement, expansion and treatment to be seen completely non-invasively. Moreover, because the same group of animals can be imaged at each time-point throughout the study, the overall number of animals used is dramatically reduced, saving lives, time, and money. Also, as each animal acts as its own control over time, the issues associated with animal-to-animal variation are circumvented, thus improving the quality of the biostatistical data generated. The ability to monitor infections in vivo in a longitudinal fashion is especially appealing to assess chronic infections such as those involving implanted devices. Typically, bacteria grow as biofilms on these foreign bodies and are reputably difficult to monitor with conventional methods. Because of the non-destructive and non-invasive nature of BPI, the procedure can be performed repeatedly in the same animal, allowing the biofilm to be studied in situ without detachment or disturbance. This ability not only allows unique patterns of disease relapse to be seen following termination of antibiotic therapy but also in vivo resistance development during prolonged treatment, both of which are common occurrences with device-related infections. This chapter describes the bioluminescent engineering of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and overviews their use in device-associated infections in several anatomical sites in a variety of animal models.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18287760
      14. Call Number :
        139321
      15. Serial :
        5568
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Nature
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        433
      8. Issue :
        7025
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aging; Animals; Antigens, CD36; Cell Line; Dimerization; Ethylnitrosourea; Gene Deletion; Glycerides; Homozygote; Humans; Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes; Lipopeptides; Membrane Glycoproteins; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; Mutagenesis; Mutation; Oligopeptides; Peptidoglycan; Phenotype; Receptors, Cell Surface; Signal Transduction; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Toll-Like Receptor 2; Toll-Like Receptors; Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; Zymosan
      12. Abstract :
        Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) is required for the recognition of numerous molecular components of bacteria, fungi and protozoa. The breadth of the ligand repertoire seems unusual, even if one considers that TLR2 may form heteromers with TLRs 1 and 6 (ref. 12), and it is likely that additional proteins serve as adapters for TLR2 activation. Here we show that an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced nonsense mutation of Cd36 (oblivious) causes a recessive immunodeficiency phenotype in which macrophages are insensitive to the R-enantiomer of MALP-2 (a diacylated bacterial lipopeptide) and to lipoteichoic acid. Homozygous mice are hypersusceptible to Staphylococcus aureus infection. Cd36(obl) macrophages readily detect S-MALP-2, PAM(2)CSK(4), PAM(3)CSK(4) and zymosan, revealing that some--but not all--TLR2 ligands are dependent on CD36. Already known as a receptor for endogenous molecules, CD36 is also a selective and nonredundant sensor of microbial diacylglycerides that signal via the TLR2/6 heterodimer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15690042
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9991
      1. Author :
        Ketonis, Constantinos; Barr, Stephanie; Adams, Christopher S; Hickok, Noreen J; Parvizi, Javad
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Clinical orthopaedics and related research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        468
      8. Issue :
        8
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Anti-Bacterial Agents; Biofilms; Bioware; Bone Substitutes; Bone Transplantation; Prostheses and Implants; Prosthesis-Related Infections; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Transplantation, Homologous; Vancomycin; Xen36
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND Bone grafts are frequently used to supplement bone stock and to establish structural stability. However, graft-associated infection represents a challenging complication leading to increased patient morbidity and healthcare costs. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES We therefore designed this study to (1) determine if increasing initial S. aureus inoculation of bone allograft results in a proportionate increase in colonization; (2) assess if antibiotics decrease colonization and if antibiotic tethering to allograft alters its ability to prevent bacterial colonization; and (3) determine if covalent modification alters the allograft topography or its biological properties. METHODS Allograft bone and vancomycin-modified bone (VAN-bone) was challenged with different doses of S. aureus for times out to 24 hours in the presence or absence of solution vancomycin. Bacterial colonization was assessed by fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and by direct colony counting. Cell density and distribution of osteoblast-like cells on control and modified allograft were then compared. RESULTS Bacterial attachment was apparent within 6 hours with colonization and biofilm formation increasing with time and dose. Solution vancomycin failed to prevent bacterial attachment whereas VAN-bone successfully resisted colonization. The allograft modification did not affect the attachment and distribution of osteoblast-like cells. CONCLUSIONS Allograft bone was readily colonized by S. aureus and covered by a biofilm with especially florid growth in natural topographic niches. Using a novel covalent modification, allograft bone was able to resist colonization by organisms while retaining the ability to allow adhesion of osteoblastic cells. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Generation of allograft bone that can resist infection in vivo would be important in addressing one of the most challenging problems associated with the use of allograft, namely infection.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20361282
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9981
      1. Author :
        Sadikot, R. T.; Blackwell, T. S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Methods Mol Biol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        477
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Adenoviridae/genetics, Anesthesia, Animals, Firefly Luciferin/administration & dosage/pharmacology, *Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects, Genetic Vectors/genetics, Luciferases/metabolism, Luminescent Measurements/*methods, Mice, Photons, Whole Body Imaging/*methods IVIS, Xenogen, Xen5
      12. Abstract :
        Molecular imaging offers many unique opportunities to study biological processes in intact organisms. Bioluminescence is the emission of light from biochemical reactions that occur within a living organism. Luciferase has been used as a reporter gene in transgenic mice but, until bioluminescence imaging was described, the detection of luciferase activity required either sectioning of the animal or excision of tissue and homogenization to measure enzyme activities in a conventional luminometer. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is based on the idea that biological light sources can be incorporated into cells and animal models artificially that does not naturally express the luminescent genes. This imaging modality has proven to be a very powerful methodology to detect luciferase reporter activity in intact animal models. This form of optical imaging is low cost and noninvasive and facilitates real-time analysis of disease processes at the molecular level in living organisms. Bioluminescence provides a noninvasive method to monitor gene expression in vivo and has enormous potential to elucidate the pathobiology of lung diseases in intact mouse models, including models of inflammation/injury, infection, and cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=19082962
      14. Call Number :
        142705
      15. Serial :
        5558
      1. Author :
        Xing, H. R.; Zhang, Q.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Methods Mol Biol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        872
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense, Animals; Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Female; Mammary Neoplasms, Animal/metabolism/pathology; Mice; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Transplantation; Neovascularization, Pathologic/drug therapy/*pathology
      12. Abstract :
        In vivo angiogenesis assays provide more physiologically relevant information about tumor vascularization than in vitro studies because they take the complex interactions among cancer cells, endothelial cells, mural cells, and tumor stroma into consideration. Traditional microscopic assessment of vascular density conducted by immunostaining of tissue sections or by lectin angiogram visualization of tumor vessels is invasive and requires the sacrifice of tumor-bearing animals. Therefore, it prohibits longitudinal time-course observation in a single animal and requires a large number of animals at each time point to derive statistically-meaningful observations. Additionally, heterogenous behavior among different tumors will inevitably introduce individual biological variance that may obscure reliable interpretation of the results. While various artificial in vivo angiogenesis assays, such as the Matrigel implant assay, chick chorioallatoic membrane assay, and dorsal skin fold chamber assay have been developed and employed to more directly observe the progression of physiological angiogenesis, they can not appropriately assess tumor angiogenic progression or tumor vascular regression in response to therapeutic intervention. Here, we describe a noninvasive method and a detailed protocol that we have developed and optimized using the Olympus OV-100 in vivo imaging system for real-time high-resolution visualization and assessment of tumor angiogenesis and vascular response to anticancer therapies in live animals. We show that using this approach, tumor vessels can be monitored longitudinally through the whole vasculogenesis and angiogenesis process in the same mouse. Further, morphologic changes of the same vessel prior to and after drug treatments can be captured with microscopic high resolution. Moreover, the multichannel co-imaging capability of the OV-100 allows us to analyze and compare tumor vessel permeability before and after antiangiogenesis therapy by employing a near-infrared blood pool reagent, or by visualizing improved cytotoxic drug delivery upon tumor vessel normalization by using a fluorophore tagged drug. This noninvasive method can be readily applied to orthotopically transplanted breast cancer models as well as to subcutaneously-transplanted tumor models.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22700407
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10443
      1. Author :
        Hanai, Koji; Takeshita, Fumitaka; Honma, Kimi; Nagahara, Shunji; Maeda, Miho; Minakuchi, Yoshiko; Sano, Akihiko; Ochiya, Takahiro
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2006
      5. Publication :
        Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        1082
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Bone Neoplasms; Collagen; Dermatitis; Disease Models, Animal; Drug Carriers; Gene Therapy; Humans; Hypersensitivity; Mice; Mice, Nude; Nanoparticles; Neoplasm Metastasis; Oligonucleotides; PC-3M-luc; RNA, Small Interfering; Tissue Distribution
      12. Abstract :
        The goal of our research is to provide a practical platform for drug delivery in oligonucleotide therapy. We report here the efficacy of an atelocollagen-mediated oligonucleotide delivery system applied to systemic siRNA and antisense oligonucleotide treatments in animal disease models. Atelocollagen and oligonucleotides formed a complex of nanosized particles, which was highly stable against nucleases. The complex allowed oligonucleotides to be delivered efficiently into several organs and tissues via intravenous administration. In a tumor metastasis model, the complex successfully delivered siRNA to metastasized tumors in bone tissue and inhibited their growth. We also demonstrated that a single intravenous treatment of the antisense oligodeoxynucleotide complex suppressed ear dermatitis in a contact hypersensitivity model. These results indicate the strong potential of the atelocollagen-mediated drug delivery system for practical therapeutic technology.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17145919
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8976
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        1192
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Biofilms; Bioware; Bone Density Conservation Agents; Chronic Disease; Cytokines; Drug Evaluation, Preclinical; Humans; Immunity; Incidence; Jaw Diseases; Mice; Neovascularization, Physiologic; Osteoclasts; Osteomyelitis; Osteonecrosis; Staphylococcal Infections; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        The effects of antiresorptive agents (e.g., alendronate [Aln], osteoprotegerin [OPG]) on bone infection are unknown. Thus, their effects on implant-associated osteomyelitis (OM) were investigated in mice using PBS (placebo), gentamycin, and etanercept (TNFR:Fc) controls. None of the drugs affected humoral immunity, angiogenesis, or chronic infection. However, the significant (P < 0.05 vs. PBS) inhibition of cortical osteolysis and decreased draining lymph node size in Aln- and OPG-treated mice was associated with a significant (P < 0.05) increase in the incidence of high-grade infections during the establishment of OM. In contrast, the high-grade infections in TNFR:Fc-treated mice were associated with immunosuppression, as evidenced by the absence of granulomas and presence of Gram(+) biofilm in the bone marrow. Collectively, these findings indicate that although antiresorptive agents do not exacerbate chronic OM, they can increase the bacterial load during early infection by decreasing lymphatic drainage and preventing the removal of necrotic bone that harbors the bacteria.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20392222
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9034