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      1. Author :
        Tekabe, Y.; Klose, A.; Nizami, S.; Luma, J.; Lee, F. Y.; Johnson, L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Biophotonics
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        4
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Antigens, CD31/metabolism; Capillaries/metabolism; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Femoral Artery/surgery; Fluorescent Dyes/*diagnostic use/metabolism; Hindlimb/*blood supply/metabolism/pathology; Integrin alphaV/metabolism; Integrin alphaVbeta3/antagonists & inhibitors/metabolism; Ischemia/*pathology; Ligation; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred Strains; Microscopy, Fluorescence; *Neovascularization, Physiologic; Plant Lectins/metabolism; Sensitivity and Specificity
      12. Abstract :
        Optical agents targeting alpha(v)beta(3) are potential tools to image the angiogenic response to limb ischemia. The left (L) femoral artery was ligated in 17 mice and sham surgery performed on the contralateral right (R) hindlimb. Seven days later, IntegriSense (2 nmol) was injected into 11 mice and 6 were probe controls. Six hours later, mice underwent optical imaging. Ratios of photon flux in the L/R limbs were calculated. Tissue was stained for alpha(v) , CD31, and lectin. The signal was increased in the ischemic limbs compared to contralateral legs and ratio of photon flux in L/R limb averaged 2.37. Control probe showed no hindlimb signal. IntegriSense colocalized with CD31 by dual fluorescent staining. Ratios for L/R hindlimbs correlated with quantitative lectin staining (r = 0.88, p = 0.003). Optical imaging can identify and quantify angiogenic response to hindlimb ischemia.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22031282
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10380
      1. Author :
        Bondareva, A.; Downey, C. M.; Ayres, F.; Liu, W.; Boyd, S. K.; Hallgrimsson, B.; Jirik, F. R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        4
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen
      12. Abstract :
        Lysyl oxidase (LOX), an extracellular matrix remodeling enzyme, appears to have a role in promoting breast cancer cell motility and invasiveness. In addition, increased LOX expression has been correlated with decreases in both metastases-free, and overall survival in breast cancer patients. With this background, we studied the ability of beta-aminopropionitrile (BAPN), an irreversible inhibitor of LOX, to regulate the metastatic colonization potential of the human breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231. BAPN was administered daily to mice starting either 1 day prior, on the same day as, or 7 days after intracardiac injection of luciferase expressing MDA-MB-231-Luc2 cells. Development of metastases was monitored by in vivo bioluminescence imaging, and tumor-induced osteolysis was assessed by micro-computed tomography (microCT). We found that BAPN administration was able to reduce the frequency of metastases. Thus, when BAPN treatment was initiated the day before, or on the same day as the intra-cardiac injection of tumor cells, the number of metastases was decreased by 44%, and 27%, and whole-body photon emission rates (reflective of total tumor burden) were diminished by 78%, and 45%, respectively. In contrast, BAPN had no effect on the growth of established metastases. Our findings suggest that LOX activity is required during extravasation and/or initial tissue colonization by circulating MDA-MB-231 cells, lending support to the idea that LOX inhibition might be useful in metastasis prevention.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=19440335
      14. Call Number :
        136327
      15. Serial :
        7869
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        PLoS pathogens
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        3
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anthrax; Bacillus anthracis; Bioware; Disease Models, Animal; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Inhalation Exposure; Luciferases; Luminescence; Luminescent Measurements; Lymph Nodes; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Nasal Cavity; Organisms, Genetically Modified; Peyer's Patches; Pharynx; pXen-5; Skin; Spores, Bacterial
      12. Abstract :
        Bacillus anthracis causes three forms of anthrax: inhalational, gastrointestinal, and cutaneous. Anthrax is characterized by both toxemia, which is caused by secretion of immunomodulating toxins (lethal toxin and edema toxin), and septicemia, which is associated with bacterial encapsulation. Here we report that, contrary to the current view of B. anthracis pathogenesis, B. anthracis spores germinate and establish infections at the initial site of inoculation in both inhalational and cutaneous infections without needing to be transported to draining lymph nodes, and that inhaled spores establish initial infection in nasal-associated lymphoid tissues. Furthermore, we found that Peyer's patches in the mouse intestine are the primary site of bacterial growth after intragastric inoculation, thus establishing an animal model of gastrointestinal anthrax. All routes of infection progressed to the draining lymph nodes, spleen, lungs, and ultimately the blood. These discoveries were made possible through the development of a novel dynamic mouse model of B. anthracis infection using bioluminescent non-toxinogenic capsulated bacteria that can be visualized within the mouse in real-time, and demonstrate the value of in vivo imaging in the analysis of B. anthracis infection. Our data imply that previously unrecognized portals of bacterial entry demand more intensive investigation, and will significantly transform the current perception of inhalational, gastrointestinal, and cutaneous B. anthracis pathogenesis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17542645
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9022
      1. Author :
        Lee, S.; Vinegoni, C.; Feruglio, P. F.; Fexon, L.; Gorbatov, R.; Pivoravov, M.; Sbarbati, A.; Nahrendorf, M.; Weissleder, R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Nat Commun
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        3
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense
      12. Abstract :
        Real-time imaging of moving organs and tissues at microscopic resolutions represents a major challenge in studying the complex biology of live animals. Here we present a technique based on a novel stabilizer setup combined with a gating acquisition algorithm for the imaging of a beating murine heart at the single-cell level. The method allows serial in vivo fluorescence imaging of the beating heart in live mice in both confocal and nonlinear modes over the course of several hours. We demonstrate the utility of this technique for in vivo optical sectioning and dual-channel time-lapse fluorescence imaging of cardiac ischaemia. The generic method could be adapted to other moving organs and thus broadly facilitate in vivo microscopic investigations.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22968700
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 7
      15. Serial :
        10436
      1. Author :
        Guo, K.; Tang, J. P.; Jie, L.; Al-Aidaroos, A. Q.; Hong, C. W.; Tan, C. P.; Park, J. E.; Varghese, L.; Feng, Z.; Zhou, J.; Chng, W. J.; Zeng, Q.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Oncotarget
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        3
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        HCT-116-luc2, IVIS, Bioware, HCT116-luc2, Animals; Antibodies, Monoclonal/*immunology; Antibody-Dependent Cell Cytotoxicity/immunology; Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/drug therapy; Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/drug therapy; Cell Line, Tumor; Colorectal Neoplasms/drug therapy; Humans; Immediate-Early Proteins/*immunology; Killer Cells, Natural/*immunology; Lymphocyte Activation/immunology; Melanoma/drug therapy; Mice; Mice, Nude; Mice, SCID; Molecular Targeted Therapy/*methods; Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases/*immunology; Recombinant Fusion Proteins/immunology/pharmacology/therapeutic use
      12. Abstract :
        Antibodies are considered as 'magic bullets' because of their high specificity. It is believed that antibodies are too large to routinely enter the cytosol, thus antibody therapeutic approach has been limited to extracellular or secreted proteins expressed by cancer cells. However, many oncogenic proteins are localized within the cell. To explore the possibility of antibody therapies against intracellular targets, we generated a chimeric antibody targeting the intracellular PRL-3 oncoprotein to assess its antitumor activities in mice. Remarkably, we observed that the PRL-3 chimeric antibody could efficiently and specifically reduce the formation of PRL-3 expressing metastatic tumors. We further found that natural killer (NK) cells were important in mediating the therapeutic effect, which was only observed in a nude mouse model (T-cell deficient), but not in a Severe Combined Immunodeficiency' (scid ) mouse model (B- and T-cell deficient), indicating the anticancer effect also depends on host B-cell activity. Our study involving 377 nude and scid mice suggest that antibodies targeting intracellular proteins can be developed to treat cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22374986
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10497
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