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      1. Author :
        Kadurugamuwa, J. L.; Modi, K.; Yu, J.; Francis, K. P.; Purchio, T.; Contag, P. R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Infection and Immunity
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        73
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals, Diagnostic Imaging/ methods, Female, Mice, Microscopy, Electron, Scanning, Photons, Proteus Infections/ diagnosis, Proteus mirabilis/drug effects/isolation & purification, Pseudomonas Infections/ diagnosis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa/drug effects/isolation & purification, Urinary Catheterization/ adverse effects, Urinary Tract Infections/ diagnosis IVIS, Xenogen, Xen5, Xen44
      12. Abstract :
        Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections acquired by humans, particularly in catheterized patients. A major problem with catheterization is the formation of bacterial biofilms on catheter material and the risk of developing persistent UTIs that are difficult to monitor and eradicate. To better understand the course of UTIs and allow more accurate studies of in vivo antibiotic efficacy, we developed a catheter-based biofilm infection model with mice, using bioluminescently engineered bacteria. Two important urinary tract pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis, were made bioluminescent by stable insertion of a complete lux operon. Segments of catheter material (precolonized or postimplant infected) with either pathogen were placed transurethrally in the lumen of the bladder by using a metal stylet without surgical manipulation. The bioluminescent strains were sufficiently bright to be readily monitored from the outside of infected animals, using a low-light optical imaging system, including the ability to trace the ascending pattern of light-emitting bacteria through ureters to the kidneys. Placement of the catheter in the bladder not only resulted in the development of strong cystitis that persisted significantly longer than in mice challenged with bacterial suspensions alone but also required prolonged antibiotic treatment to reduce the level of infection. Treatment of infected mice for 4 days with ciprofloxacin at 30 mg/kg of body weight twice a day cured cystitis and renal infection in noncatheterized mice. Similarly, ciprofloxacin reduced the bacterial burden to undetectable levels in catheterized mice but did not inhibit rebound of the infection upon cessation of antibiotic therapy. This methodology easily allows spatial information to be monitored sequentially throughout the entire disease process, including ascending UTI, treatment efficacy, and relapse, all without exogenous sampling, which is not possible with conventional methods.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15972473
      14. Call Number :
        139333
      15. Serial :
        7110
      1. Author :
        Kadurugamuwa, J. L.; Modi, K.; Coquoz, O.; Rice, B.; Smith, S.; Contag, P. R.; Purchio, T.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Infection and Immunity
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        73
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen, Xen10
      12. Abstract :
        We developed a method for simultaneous in vivo biophotonic monitoring of pneumococcal meningitis and the accompanying neuronal injury in live transgenic mice. Streptococcus pneumoniae engineered for bioluminescence (lux) was used for direct visualization of disease progression and antibiotic treatment in a mouse model of meningitis. The host response was monitored in transgenic mice containing an inducible firefly luciferase (luc) reporter gene under transcriptional control of the mouse glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) promoter. Based on the different spectra of light emission and substrate requirements for lux and luc, we were able to separately monitor the two reporters using a highly sensitive in vivo imaging system. The level of neuronal damage and recovery following antibiotic treatment was dependent on the time of treatment. This model has potential for simultaneous multiparameter monitoring and testing of therapies that target the pathogen or host response to prevent neuronal injury and recovery.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16299273
      14. Call Number :
        139327
      15. Serial :
        7497
      1. Author :
        Srivastava, Amit; Henneke, Philipp; Visintin, Alberto; Morse, Sarah C; Martin, Victoria; Watkins, Claire; Paton, James C; Wessels, Michael R; Golenbock, Douglas T; Malley, Richard
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Infection and immunity
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        73
      8. Issue :
        10
      9. Page Numbers :
        6479-6487
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Amino Acid Chloromethyl Ketones; Animals; Apoptosis; Bacterial Proteins; Caspases; Lipopolysaccharides; Macrophages; Mice; Mice, Inbred Strains; Nasopharynx; Pneumococcal Infections; Streptococcus pneumoniae; Streptolysins; Xen10
      12. Abstract :
        Pneumolysin, the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin of Streptococcus pneumoniae, induces inflammatory and apoptotic events in mammalian cells. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) confers resistance to pneumococcal infection via its interaction with pneumolysin, but the underlying mechanisms remain to be identified. In the present study, we found that pneumolysin-induced apoptosis is also mediated by TLR4 and confers protection against invasive disease. The interaction between TLR4 and pneumolysin is direct and specific; ligand-binding studies demonstrated that pneumolysin binds to TLR4 but not to TLR2. Involvement of TLR4 in pneumolysin-induced apoptosis was demonstrated in several complementary experiments. First, macrophages from wild-type mice were significantly more prone to pneumolysin-induced apoptosis than cells from TLR4-defective mice. In gain-of-function experiments, we found that epithelial cells expressing TLR4 and stimulated with pneumolysin were more likely to undergo apoptosis than cells expressing TLR2. A specific TLR4 antagonist, B1287, reduced pneumolysin-mediated apoptosis in wild-type cells. This apoptotic response was also partially caspase dependent as preincubation of cells with the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk reduced pneumolysin-induced apoptosis. Finally, in a mouse model of pneumococcal infection, pneumolysin-producing pneumococci elicited significantly more upper respiratory tract cell apoptosis in wild-type mice than in TLR4-defective mice, and blocking apoptosis by administration of zVAD-fmk to wild-type mice resulted in a significant increase in mortality following nasopharyngeal pneumococcal exposure. Overall, our results strongly suggest that protection against pneumococcal disease is dependent on the TLR4-mediated enhancement of pneumolysin-induced apoptosis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16177320
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        10001
      1. Author :
        Park, H. S.; Cleary, P. P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Infection and Immunity
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        73
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen, Xen20
      12. Abstract :
        C5a peptidase, also called SCPA (surface-bound C5a peptidase), is a surface-bound protein on group A streptococci (GAS), etiologic agents for a variety of human diseases including pharyngitis, impetigo, toxic shock, and necrotizing fasciitis, as well as the postinfection sequelae rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease. This protein is highly conserved among different serotypes and is also expressed in human isolates of group B, C, and G streptococci. Human tonsils are the primary reservoirs for GAS, maintaining endemic disease across the globe. We recently reported that GAS preferentially target nasal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) in mice, a tissue functionally analogous to human tonsils. Experiments using a C5a peptidase loss-of-function mutant and an intranasal infection model showed that this protease is required for efficient colonization of NALT. An effective vaccine should prevent infection of this secondary lymphoid tissue; therefore, the potential of anti-SCPA antibodies to protect against streptococcal infection of NALT was investigated. Experiments showed that GAS colonization of NALT was significantly reduced following intranasal immunization of mice with recombinant SCPA protein administered alone or with cholera toxin, whereas a high degree of GAS colonization of NALT was observed in control mice immunized with phosphate-buffered saline only. Moreover, administration of anti-SCPA serum by the intranasal route protected mice against streptococcal infection. These results suggest that intranasal immunization with SCPA would prevent colonization and infection of human tonsils, thereby eliminating potential reservoirs that maintain endemic disease.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16299278
      14. Call Number :
        141964
      15. Serial :
        5327
      1. Author :
        Curbelo, J; Moulton, K; Willard, S
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Theriogenology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        73
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Cattle; Escherichia coli; Female; Genitalia, Female; Optical Phenomena; Photons; Xen14
      12. Abstract :
        The objectives of this study were to (1) characterize the photonic properties of Escherichia coli-Xen14 and (2) conduct photonic imaging of E. coli-Xen14 within bovine reproductive tract segments (RTS) ex vivo (Bos indicus). E. coli-Xen14 was grown for 24h in Luria Bertani medium (LB), with or without kanamycin (KAN). Every 24h, for an 8-d interval, inoculums were imaged and photonic emissions (PE) collected. Inoculums were subcultured and plated daily to determine the colony forming units (CFU) and ratio of photon emitters to nonemitters. In the second objective, abattoir-derived bovine reproductive tracts (n=9) were separated into posterior and anterior vagina, cervix, uterine body, and uterine horns. Two concentrations (3.2x10(8) and 3.2x10(6) CFU/200microL for relative [High] and [Low], respectively) of E. coli-Xen14 were placed in translucent tubes for detection of PE through RTS. The CFU did not differ (P=0.31) over time with or without KAN presence; they remained stable with 99.93% and 99.98% photon emitters, respectively. However, PE were lower (P<0.0001) in cultures containing KAN than in those containing no KAN (629.8+/-117.7 vs. 3012.0+/-423.5 relative lights units per second [RLU/sec], respectively). On average, the percentage of PE between RTS, for both concentrations, was higher (P<0.05) in the uterine body. In summary, E. coli-Xen14 remained stable with respect to the proportions of photon emitters with or without KAN (used to selectively culture E. coli-Xen14). However, KAN presence suppressed photonic activity. The ability to detect PE through various segments of the reproductive tract demonstrated the feasibility of monitoring the presence of E. coli-Xen14 in the bovine reproductive tract ex vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19819541
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        10004
      1. Author :
        Curbelo, J.; Moulton, K.; Willard, S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Theriogenology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        73
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen14, Xen 14, E. coli Xen14, IVIS, Animals; Cattle; Escherichia coli/*cytology/isolation & purification/physiology; Female; Genitalia, Female/*microbiology; Optical Phenomena; *Photons
      12. Abstract :
        The objectives of this study were to (1) characterize the photonic properties of Escherichia coli-Xen14 and (2) conduct photonic imaging of E. coli-Xen14 within bovine reproductive tract segments (RTS) ex vivo (Bos indicus). E. coli-Xen14 was grown for 24h in Luria Bertani medium (LB), with or without kanamycin (KAN). Every 24h, for an 8-d interval, inoculums were imaged and photonic emissions (PE) collected. Inoculums were subcultured and plated daily to determine the colony forming units (CFU) and ratio of photon emitters to nonemitters. In the second objective, abattoir-derived bovine reproductive tracts (n=9) were separated into posterior and anterior vagina, cervix, uterine body, and uterine horns. Two concentrations (3.2x10(8) and 3.2x10(6) CFU/200microL for relative [High] and [Low], respectively) of E. coli-Xen14 were placed in translucent tubes for detection of PE through RTS. The CFU did not differ (P=0.31) over time with or without KAN presence; they remained stable with 99.93% and 99.98% photon emitters, respectively. However, PE were lower (P<0.0001) in cultures containing KAN than in those containing no KAN (629.8+/-117.7 vs. 3012.0+/-423.5 relative lights units per second [RLU/sec], respectively). On average, the percentage of PE between RTS, for both concentrations, was higher (P<0.05) in the uterine body. In summary, E. coli-Xen14 remained stable with respect to the proportions of photon emitters with or without KAN (used to selectively culture E. coli-Xen14). However, KAN presence suppressed photonic activity. The ability to detect PE through various segments of the reproductive tract demonstrated the feasibility of monitoring the presence of E. coli-Xen14 in the bovine reproductive tract ex vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19819541
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10391
      1. Author :
        Orihuela, C. J.; Radin, J. N.; Sublett, J. E.; Gao, G.; Kaushal, D.; Tuomanen, E. I.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2004
      5. Publication :
        Infection and Immunity
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        72
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen, Xen7, Xen35
      12. Abstract :
        Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of invasive bacterial disease. This is the first study to examine the expression of S. pneumoniae genes in vivo by using whole-genome microarrays available from The Institute for Genomic Research. Total RNA was collected from pneumococci isolated from infected blood, infected cerebrospinal fluid, and bacteria attached to a pharyngeal epithelial cell line in vitro. Microarray analysis of pneumococcal genes expressed in these models identified body site-specific patterns of expression for virulence factors, transporters, transcription factors, translation-associated proteins, metabolism, and genes with unknown function. Contributions to virulence predicted for several unknown genes with enhanced expression in vivo were confirmed by insertion duplication mutagenesis and challenge of mice with the mutants. Finally, we cross-referenced our results with previous studies that used signature-tagged mutagenesis and differential fluorescence induction to identify genes that are potentially required by a broad range of pneumococcal strains for invasive disease.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15385455
      14. Call Number :
        141856
      15. Serial :
        6874
      1. Author :
        Earley, S.; Vinegoni, C.; Dunham, J.; Gorbatov, R.; Feruglio, P. F.; Weissleder, R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        72
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense, Annexin Vivo, Annexin-Vivo, Aniline Compounds/*pharmacology; Animals; Antineoplastic Agents/*pharmacology; *Apoptosis; Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy/*physiopathology; Cell Line, Tumor; Female; Green Fluorescent Proteins; Humans; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; Mice; Mice, Nude; Mitochondrial Membranes/drug effects/*physiology; Mitochondrial Proteins/metabolism; Molecular Imaging/*methods; Pancreatic Neoplasms/drug therapy/*physiopathology; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2/antagonists & inhibitors; Recombinant Fusion Proteins/metabolism; Single-Cell Analysis; Sulfonamides/*pharmacology; Tumor Microenvironment
      12. Abstract :
        Observing drug responses in the tumor microenvironment in vivo can be technically challenging. As a result, cellular responses to molecularly targeted cancer drugs are often studied in cell culture, which does not accurately represent the behavior of cancer cells growing in vivo. Using high-resolution microscopy and fluorescently labeled genetic reporters for apoptosis, we developed an approach to visualize drug-induced cell death at single-cell resolution in vivo. Stable expression of the mitochondrial intermembrane protein IMS-RP was established in human breast and pancreatic cancer cells. Image analysis was then used to quantify release of IMS-RP into the cytoplasm upon apoptosis and irreversible mitochondrial permeabilization. Both breast and pancreatic cancer cells showed higher basal apoptotic rates in vivo than in culture. To study drug-induced apoptosis, we exposed tumor cells to navitoclax (ABT-263), an inhibitor of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Bcl-w, both in vitro and in vivo. Although the tumors responded to Bcl-2 inhibition in vivo, inducing apoptosis in around 20% of cancer cells, the observed response was much higher in cell culture. Together, our findings show an imaging technique that can be used to directly visualize cell death within the tumor microenvironment in response to drug treatment.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22505651
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 11
      15. Serial :
        10433
      1. Author :
        Liu, W.; McDaniel, J.; Li, X.; Asai, D.; Quiroz, F. G.; Schaal, J.; Park, J. S.; Zalutsky, M.; Chilkoti, A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        72
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        PC-3M-luc2, PC3M-luc2, IVIS, Prostate Cancer, Bioware
      12. Abstract :
        Brachytherapy is a common clinical technique involving implantation of sealed radioactive “seeds” within a tumor to selectively irradiate the tumor mass while minimizing systemic toxicity. To mitigate the disadvantages associated with complex surgical implantation and subsequent device removal procedures, we have developed an alternative approach using a genetically encoded peptide polymer solution composed of a thermally responsive elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) radiolabeled with (131)I that self-assembles into radionuclide seeds upon intratumoral injection. The formation of these nontoxic and biodegradable polymer seeds led to prolonged intratumoral retention (~85% ID/tumor 7 days postinjection) of the radionuclide, elicited a tumor growth delay in 100% of the tumors in two human xenografts (FaDu and PC-3), and cured more than 67% of tumor-bearing animals after a single administration of labeled ELP. These results suggest that in situ self-assembly of biodegradable and injectable radionuclide-containing polypeptide seeds could be a promising therapeutic alternative to conventional brachytherapy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23155121
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10487
      1. Author :
        Chen, J.; Gallo, K. A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        72
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        4130-40
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-luc2-tdtomato, IVIS, tdtomato, fluorescent protein, Animals; Breast Neoplasms/enzymology/*metabolism/*pathology; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Movement/*physiology; Chemokine CXCL12/metabolism; Female; Humans; MAP Kinase Kinase Kinases/*metabolism; MAP Kinase Signaling System; Mice; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Invasiveness; Paxillin/*metabolism; Phosphorylation
      12. Abstract :
        MLK3 kinase activates multiple mitogen-activated protein kinases and plays a critical role in cancer cell migration and invasion. In the tumor microenvironment, prometastatic factors drive breast cancer invasion and metastasis, but their associated signaling pathways are not well-known. Here, we provide evidence that MLK3 is required for chemokine (CXCL12)-induced invasion of basal breast cancer cells. We found that MLK3 induced robust phosphorylation of the focal adhesion scaffold paxillin on Ser 178 and Tyr 118, which was blocked by silencing or inhibition of MLK3-JNK. Silencing or inhibition of MLK3, inhibition of JNK, or expression of paxillin S178A all led to enhanced Rho activity, indicating that the MLK3-JNK-paxillin axis limits Rho activity to promote focal adhesion turnover and migration. Consistent with this, MLK3 silencing increased focal adhesions and stress fibers in breast cancer cells. MLK3 silencing also decreased the formation of breast cancer lung metastases in vivo, and breast cancer cells derived from mouse lung metastases showed enhanced Ser 178 paxillin phosphorylation. Taken together, our findings suggest that the MLK3-JNK-paxillin signaling axis may represent a potential therapeutic target and/or prognostic marker in breast cancer metastasis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22700880
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10495
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