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      1. Author :
        Xu, D.; Takeshita, F.; Hino, Y.; Fukunaga, S.; Kudo, Y.; Tamaki, A.; Matsunaga, J.; Takahashi, R. U.; Takata, T.; Shimamoto, A.; Ochiya, T.; Tahara, H.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Cell Biol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        193
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-D3H2Ln, IVIS, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        Cellular senescence acts as a barrier to cancer progression, and microRNAs (miRNAs) are thought to be potential senescence regulators. However, whether senescence-associated miRNAs (SA-miRNAs) contribute to tumor suppression remains unknown. Here, we report that miR-22, a novel SA-miRNA, has an impact on tumorigenesis. miR-22 is up-regulated in human senescent fibroblasts and epithelial cells but down-regulated in various cancer cell lines. miR-22 overexpression induces growth suppression and acquisition of a senescent phenotype in human normal and cancer cells. miR-22 knockdown in presenescent fibroblasts decreased cell size, and cells became more compact. miR-22-induced senescence also decreases cell motility and inhibits cell invasion in vitro. Synthetic miR-22 delivery suppresses tumor growth and metastasis in vivo by inducing cellular senescence in a mouse model of breast carcinoma. We confirmed that CDK6, SIRT1, and Sp1, genes involved in the senescence program, are direct targets of miR-22. Our study provides the first evidence that miR-22 restores the cellular senescence program in cancer cells and acts as a tumor suppressor.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21502362
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10417
      1. Author :
        Bendaoud, M.; Vinogradov, E.; Balashova, N. V.; Kadouri, D. E.; Kachlany, S. C.; Kaplan, J. B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Bacteriol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        193
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen29, Xen 29, Staphylococcus aureus Xen29, IVISBacterial Physiological Phenomena/drug effects; Bacterial Proteins/genetics/metabolism; Biofilms/*drug effects; *Down-Regulation/drug effects; Fungi/drug effects/physiology; Kingella kingae/chemistry/genetics/*metabolism; Molecular Sequence Data; Polysaccharides, Bacterial/biosynthesis/chemistry/*pharmacology
      12. Abstract :
        Cell-free extracts prepared from Kingella kingae colony biofilms were found to inhibit biofilm formation by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Candida albicans, and K. kingae. The extracts evidently inhibited biofilm formation by modifying the physicochemical properties of the cell surface, the biofilm matrix, and the substrate. Chemical and biochemical analyses indicated that the biofilm inhibition activity in the K. kingae extract was due to polysaccharide. Structural analyses showed that the extract contained two major polysaccharides. One was a linear polysaccharide with the structure -->6)-alpha-d-GlcNAcp-(1-->5)-beta-d-OclAp-(2-->, which was identical to a capsular polysaccharide produced by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5. The second was a novel linear polysaccharide, designated PAM galactan, with the structure -->3)-beta-d-Galf-(1-->6)-beta-d-Galf-(1-->. Purified PAM galactan exhibited broad-spectrum biofilm inhibition activity. A cluster of three K. kingae genes encoding UDP-galactopyranose mutase (ugm) and two putative galactofuranosyl transferases was sufficient for the synthesis of PAM galactan in Escherichia coli. PAM galactan is one of a growing number of bacterial polysaccharides that exhibit antibiofilm activity. The biological roles and potential technological applications of these molecules remain unknown.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21602333
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 17
      15. Serial :
        10446
      1. Author :
        Rambow-Larsen, Amy A; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Petersen, Erik; Splitter, Gary
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Journal of bacteriology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        190
      8. Issue :
        9
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Amino Acid Sequence; Animals; Bioware; Brucella melitensis; Brucellosis; Disease Models, Animal; Flagella; Gene Deletion; Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial; Interferon Regulatory Factor-1; Macrophages; Mice; Mice, Mutant Strains; Molecular Sequence Data; Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis; pXen-13; Quorum Sensing; Repressor Proteins; Trans-Activators; Virulence Factors
      12. Abstract :
        Brucella melitensis is an intracellular pathogen that establishes a replicative niche within macrophages. While the intracellular lifestyle of Brucella is poorly understood and few virulence factors have been identified, components of a quorum-sensing pathway in Brucella have recently been identified. The LuxR-type regulatory protein, VjbR, and an N-acylhomoserine lactone signaling molecule are both involved in regulating expression of the virB-encoded type IV secretion system. We have identified a second LuxR-type regulatory protein (BlxR) in Brucella. Microarray analysis of a blxR mutant suggests that BlxR regulates the expression of a number of genes, including those encoding the type IV secretion system and flagella. Confirming these results, deletion of blxR in B. melitensis reduced the transcriptional activities of promoters for the virB operon, flagellar genes, and another putative virulence factor gene, bopA. Furthermore, our data suggested that both BlxR and VjbR are positively autoregulated and cross-regulate the expression of each other. The blxR deletion strain exhibited reduced growth in macrophages, similar to that observed for a vjbR deletion strain. However, unlike the vjbR deletion, the blxR deletion did not fully attenuate virulence in mice. More strikingly, bioluminescent imaging revealed that dissemination of the blxR mutant was similar to that of wild-type B. melitensis, while the vjbR mutant was defective for systemic spread in IRF-1(-/-) mice, suggesting that these regulators are not functionally redundant but that they converge in a common pathway regulating bacterial processes.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18310341
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9030
      1. Author :
        Orihuela, Carlos J; Gao, Geli; Francis, Kevin P; Yu, Jun; Tuomanen, Elaine I
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2004
      5. Publication :
        The Journal of infectious diseases
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        190
      8. Issue :
        9
      9. Page Numbers :
        1661-1669
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bacteremia; Bacterial Proteins; Cerebrospinal Fluid; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Lung; Meningitis, Pneumococcal; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mutation; N-Acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine Amidase; Nasopharynx; Neuraminidase; Pneumococcal Infections; Pneumonia, Pneumococcal; Pyruvate Oxidase; Streptococcus pneumoniae; Streptolysins; Virulence Factors; Xen7
      12. Abstract :
        We assessed the ability of Streptococcus pneumoniae mutants deficient in either choline binding protein A (CbpA), pneumolysin (Pln), pyruvate oxidase (SpxB), autolysin (LytA), pneumococcal surface protein A, or neuraminidase A (NanA) to replicate in distinct anatomical sites and translocate from one site to the next. Intranasal, intratracheal, and intravenous models of disease were assessed in 4-week-old BALB/cJ mice by quantitation of bacterial titers in the relevant organs. Mice were also observed by use of real-time bioluminescent imaging (BLI). BLI allowed visualization of the bacteria in sites not tested by sampling. All mutants were created in D39 Xen7, a fully virulent derivative of capsular type 2 strain D39 that contains an optimized luxABCDE cassette. NanA, SpxB, and, to a lesser extent, CbpA contributed to prolonged nasopharyngeal colonization, whereas CbpA and NanA contributed to the transition to the lower respiratory tract. Once lung infection was established, Pln, SpxB, and LytA contributed to bacterial replication in the lungs and translocation to the bloodstream. In the bloodstream, only Pln and LytA were required for high-titer replication, whereas CbpA was required for invasion of the cerebrospinal fluid. We conclude that transitions between body sites require virulence determinants distinct from those involved in organ-specific replication.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15478073
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        10002
      1. Author :
        Palmer, Kelli L; Aye, Lindsay M; Whiteley, Marvin
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Journal of bacteriology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        189
      8. Issue :
        22
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Adult; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bacterial Proteins; Bacteriological Techniques; Bioware; Culture Media; Cystic Fibrosis; Gene Expression Profiling; Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial; Humans; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Sputum; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen36
      12. Abstract :
        The sputum (mucus) layer of the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung is a complex substrate that provides Pseudomonas aeruginosa with carbon and energy to support high-density growth during chronic colonization. Unfortunately, the CF lung sputum layer has been difficult to mimic in animal models of CF disease, and mechanistic studies of P. aeruginosa physiology during growth in CF sputum are hampered by its complexity. In this study, we performed chromatographic and enzymatic analyses of CF sputum to develop a defined, synthetic CF sputum medium (SCFM) that mimics the nutritional composition of CF sputum. Importantly, P. aeruginosa displays similar phenotypes during growth in CF sputum and in SCFM, including similar growth rates, gene expression profiles, carbon substrate preferences, and cell-cell signaling profiles. Using SCFM, we provide evidence that aromatic amino acids serve as nutritional cues that influence cell-cell signaling and antimicrobial activity of P. aeruginosa during growth in CF sputum.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17873029
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9985
      1. Author :
        Albanesi, M.; Mancardi, D. A.; Macdonald, L. E.; Iannascoli, B.; Zitvogel, L.; Murphy, A. J.; Leusen, J. H.; Bruhns, P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Immunol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        189
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        B16-F10-luc2, B16F10-luc2, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        mAb therapy for experimental metastatic melanoma relies on activating receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (FcgammaR). Opposing results on the respective contribution of mouse FcgammaRI, FcgammaRIII, and FcgammaRIV have been reported using the gp75-expressing B16 melanoma and the protective anti-gp75 mAb TA99. We analyzed the contribution of FcgammaRs to this therapy model using bioluminescent measurement of lung metastases loads, novel mouse strains, and anti-FcgammaR blocking mAbs. We found that the TA99 mAb-mediated effects in a combination therapy using cyclophosphamide relied on activating FcgammaRs. The combination therapy, however, was not more efficient than mAb therapy alone. We demonstrate that FcgammaRI and, unexpectedly, FcgammaRIII contributed to TA99 mAb therapeutic effects, whereas FcgammaRIV did not. Therefore, FcgammaRIII and FcgammaRI are, together, responsible for anti-gp75 mAb therapy of B16 lung metastases. Our finding that mouse FcgammaRIII contributes to Ab-induced tumor reduction correlates with clinical data on its human functional equivalent human FcgammaRIIIA (CD16A).
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23150715
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 8
      15. Serial :
        10482
      1. Author :
        Yan, J.; Meng, X.; Wancket, L. M.; Lintner, K.; Nelin, L. D.; Chen, B.; Francis, K. P.; Smith, C. V.; Rogers, L. K.; Liu, Y.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Immunol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        188
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Escherichia coli/immunology; Escherichia coli Infections/enzymology/immunology/*prevention & control; Extracellular Space/genetics/*immunology/metabolism; Glutathione Reductase/deficiency/genetics/*physiology; Humans; Mice; Mice, Inbred C3H; Mice, Knockout; Neutrophils/*immunology/*metabolism/microbiology; Oxidative Stress/genetics/*immunology; Phagocytosis/genetics/*immunology; Staphylococcal Infections/enzymology/immunology/*prevention & control; Staphylococcus aureus/immunology
      12. Abstract :
        Glutathione reductase (Gsr) catalyzes the reduction of glutathione disulfide to glutathione, which plays an important role in the bactericidal function of phagocytes. Because Gsr has been implicated in the oxidative burst in human neutrophils and is abundantly expressed in the lymphoid system, we hypothesized that Gsr-deficient mice would exhibit marked defects during the immune response against bacterial challenge. We report in this study that Gsr-null mice exhibited enhanced susceptibility to Escherichia coli challenge, indicated by dramatically increased bacterial burden, cytokine storm, striking histological abnormalities, and substantially elevated mortality. Additionally, Gsr-null mice exhibited elevated sensitivity to Staphylococcus aureus. Examination of the bactericidal functions of the neutrophils from Gsr-deficient mice in vitro revealed impaired phagocytosis and defective bacterial killing activities. Although Gsr catalyzes the regeneration of glutathione, a major cellular antioxidant, Gsr-deficient neutrophils paradoxically produced far less reactive oxygen species upon activation both ex vivo and in vivo. Unlike wild-type neutrophils that exhibited a sustained oxidative burst upon stimulation with phorbol ester and fMLP, Gsr-deficient neutrophils displayed a very transient oxidative burst that abruptly ceased shortly after stimulation. Likewise, Gsr-deficient neutrophils also exhibited an attenuated oxidative burst upon encountering E. coli. Biochemical analysis revealed that the hexose monophosphate shunt was compromised in Gsr-deficient neutrophils. Moreover, Gsr-deficient neutrophils displayed a marked impairment in the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps, a bactericidal mechanism that operates after neutrophil death. Thus, Gsr-mediated redox regulation is crucial for bacterial clearance during host defense against massive bacterial challenge.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22279102
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10398
      1. Author :
        Echchannaoui, H.; Frei, K.; Schnell, C.; Leib, S. L.; Zimmerli, W.; Landmann, R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2002
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Infectious Diseases
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        186
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals, Ceftriaxone/therapeutic use, Cephalosporins/therapeutic use, Disease Models, Animal, Disease Susceptibility, Drosophila Proteins, Inflammation/genetics/immunology/microbiology/pathology, Listeria Infections/genetics/immunology, Listeria monocytogenes/genetics/immunology, Membrane Glycoproteins/ deficiency/genetics, Meningitis, Bacterial/ genetics/ immunology/microbiology/pathology, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Pneumococcal Infections/genetics/immunology/microbiology/pathology, Receptors, Cell Surface/ deficiency/genetics, Streptococcus pneumoniae/ immunology, Time Factors, Toll-Like Receptor 2, Toll-Like Receptors IVIS, Xenogen, Xen10
      12. Abstract :
        Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2) mediates host responses to gram-positive bacterial wall components. TLR2 function was investigated in a murine Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis model in wild-type (wt) and TLR2-deficient (TLR2(-/-)) mice. TLR2(-/-) mice showed earlier time of death than wt mice (P<.02). Plasma interleukin-6 levels and bacterial numbers in blood and peripheral organs were similar for both strains. With ceftriaxone therapy, none of the wt but 27% of the TLR2(-/-) mice died (P<.04). Beyond 3 hours after infection, TLR2(-/-) mice had higher bacterial loads in brain than did wt mice, as assessed with luciferase-tagged S. pneumoniae by means of a Xenogen-CCD (charge-coupled device) camera. After 24 h, tumor necrosis factor activity was higher in cerebrospinal fluid of TLR2(-/-) than wt mice (P<.05) and was related to increased blood-brain barrier permeability (Evans blue staining, P<.02). In conclusion, the lack of TLR2 was associated with earlier death from meningitis, which was not due to sepsis but to reduced brain bacterial clearing, followed by increased intrathecal inflammation.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12198614
      14. Call Number :
        137638
      15. Serial :
        7950
      1. Author :
        Thurlow, L. R.; Hanke, M. L.; Fritz, T.; Angle, A.; Aldrich, A.; Williams, S. H.; Engebretsen, I. L.; Bayles, K. W.; Horswill, A. R.; Kielian, T.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Immunol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        186
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xen29, Xen 29, Staphylococcus aureus Xen29, Animals; *Biofilms; Catheter-Related Infections/immunology/metabolism/microbiology; Cytokines/immunology/metabolism; Green Fluorescent Proteins/genetics/metabolism; Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology; Immune Evasion/immunology; Inflammation/*immunology/metabolism; Macrophages/*immunology/metabolism; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; Mice, Transgenic; Microscopy, Confocal; Microscopy, Electron, Scanning; Models, Immunological; Phagocytosis/*immunology; Staphylococcal Infections/*immunology/metabolism/microbiology; Staphylococcus aureus/*immunology/physiology/ultrastructure; Toll-Like Receptor 2/genetics/immunology; Toll-Like Receptor 9/genetics/immunology
      12. Abstract :
        Biofilms are complex communities of bacteria encased in a matrix composed primarily of polysaccharides, extracellular DNA, and protein. Staphylococcus aureus can form biofilm infections, which are often debilitating due to their chronicity and recalcitrance to antibiotic therapy. Currently, the immune mechanisms elicited during biofilm growth and their impact on bacterial clearance remain to be defined. We used a mouse model of catheter-associated biofilm infection to assess the functional importance of TLR2 and TLR9 in the host immune response during biofilm formation, because ligands for both receptors are present within the biofilm. Interestingly, neither TLR2 nor TLR9 impacted bacterial density or inflammatory mediator secretion during biofilm growth in vivo, suggesting that S. aureus biofilms circumvent these traditional bacterial recognition pathways. Several potential mechanisms were identified to account for biofilm evasion of innate immunity, including significant reductions in IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, CXCL2, and CCL2 expression during biofilm infection compared with the wound healing response elicited by sterile catheters, limited macrophage invasion into biofilms in vivo, and a skewing of the immune response away from a microbicidal phenotype as evidenced by decreases in inducible NO synthase expression concomitant with robust arginase-1 induction. Coculture studies of macrophages with S. aureus biofilms in vitro revealed that macrophages successful at biofilm invasion displayed limited phagocytosis and gene expression patterns reminiscent of alternatively activated M2 macrophages. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that S. aureus biofilms are capable of attenuating traditional host proinflammatory responses, which may explain why biofilm infections persist in an immunocompetent host.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21525381
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 19
      15. Serial :
        10457
      1. Author :
        Penna, F. J.; Chow, J. S.; Minnillo, B. J.; Passerotti, C. C.; Barnewolt, C. E.; Treves, S. T.; Fahey, F. H.; Dunning, P. S.; Freilich, D. A.; Retik, A. B.; Nguyen, H. T.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Urol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        185
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, Animals; Diagnostic Imaging; Disease Models, Animal; Fluorescence; *Kidney Pelvis; Mice; Ureteral Obstruction/*diagnosis
      12. Abstract :
        PURPOSE: Radiological imaging is the mainstay of diagnosing ureteropelvic junction obstruction. Current established radiological modalities can potentially differentiate the varying degrees of obstruction but they are limited in functionality, applicability and/or comprehensiveness. Of particular concern is that some tests require radiation, which has long-term consequences, especially in children. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We investigated the novel use of Genhance 680 dynamic fluorescence imaging to assess ureteropelvic junction obstruction in 20 mice that underwent partial or complete unilateral ureteral obstruction. Ultrasound, mercaptoacetyltriglycine renography, magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescence imaging were performed. RESULTS: Our model of partial and complete obstruction could be distinguished by ultrasound, mercaptoacetyltriglycine renography and magnetic resonance imaging, and was confirmed by histological analysis. Using fluorescence imaging distinct vascular and urinary parameters were identified in the partial and complete obstruction groups compared to controls. CONCLUSIONS: Fluorescence imaging is a feasible alternative radiological imaging modality to diagnose ureteropelvic junction obstruction. It provides continuous, detailed imaging without the risk of radiation exposure.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21511294
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 14
      15. Serial :
        10473
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