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      1. Author :
        Priddle, Helen; Grabowska, Anna; Morris, Teresa; Clarke, Philip A; McKenzie, Andrew J; Sottile, Virginie; Denning, Chris; Young, Lorraine; Watson, Sue
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Cloning and stem cells
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        11
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Cell Differentiation; Chick Embryo; Embryonic Stem Cells; Fluorescent Dyes; Humans; Luciferases; Luminescent Measurements; Mice; Mice, SCID; PC-3M-luc; Software; Stem Cell Transplantation; Teratoma
      12. Abstract :
        Research into the behavior, efficacy, and biosafety of stem cells with a view to clinical transplantation requires the development of noninvasive methods for in vivo imaging of cells transplanted into animal models. This is particularly relevant for human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), because transplantation of undifferentiated hESCs leads to tumor formation. The present study aimed to monitor hESCs in real time when injected in vivo. hESCs were stably transfected to express luciferase, and luciferase expression was clearly detected in the undifferentiated and differentiated state. When transfected hESCs were injected into chick embryos, bioluminescence could be detected both ex and in ovo. In the SCID mouse model, undifferentiated hESCs were detectable after injection either into the muscle layer of the peritoneum or the kidney capsule. Tumors became detectable between days 10-30, with approximately a 3 log increase in the luminescence signal by day 75. The growth phase occurred earlier in the kidney capsule and then reached a plateau, whilst tumors in the peritoneal wall grew steadily throughout the period analysed. These results show the widespread utility of bioluminescent for in vivo imaging of hESCs in a variety of model systems for preclinical research into regenerative medicine and cancer biology.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19522673
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8961
      1. Author :
        Ru, P.; Steele, R.; Newhall, P.; Phillips, N. J.; Toth, K.; Ray, R. B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Mol Cancer Ther
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        11
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        PC-3M-luc-C6, PC-3M-luc, IVIS, Bioware, Prostate cancer, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        Prostate cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths among American men. Early diagnosis increases survival rate in patients; however, treatments for advanced disease are limited to hormone ablation techniques and palliative care. Thus, new methods of treatment are necessary for inhibiting prostate cancer disease progression. Here, we have shown that miRNA-29b (miR-29b) expression was lower in prostate cancer cells (PC3 and LNCaP) as compared with immortalized prostate epithelial cells. Between these two prostate cancer cell lines, metastatic prostate cancer PC3 cells displayed lower expression of miR-29b. We also observed a significant downregulation of miR-29b expression in human prostate cancer tissues as compared with patient-matched nontumor tissues. PC3 cells ectopically expressing miR-29b inhibited wound healing, invasiveness, and failed to colonize in the lungs and liver of severe combined immunodeficient mice after intravenous injection, while PC3 cells expressing a control miRNA displayed metastasis. Epithelial cell marker E-cadherin expression was enhanced miR-29b transfected in prostate cancer cells as compared with cells expressing control miRNA. On the other hand, N-cadherin, Twist, and Snail expression was downregulated in PC3 cells expressing miR-29b. Together these results suggested that miR-29b acts as an antimetastatic miRNA for prostate cancer cells at multiple steps in a metastatic cascade. Therefore, miR-29b could be a potentially new attractive target for therapeutic intervention in prostate cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22402125
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10539
      1. Author :
        G. Blum
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Current Opinion in Drug Discovery Development
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        10
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Biology; Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        Proteases; pathology; biological markers; fluorescence imaging reagents; in vivo imaging; fluorescence molecular tomography; FMT
      12. Abstract :
        Proteases play pivotal roles in the normal function of cells. In addition, the expression and activity of proteases are significantly upregulated in several pathologies, including cancer, arthritis and atherosclerosis, and hence they can be considered to be biological markers for these pathologies. The hydrolyzing activity of proteases has been used to generate a variety of fluorescent imaging reagents, the design and utility of which are reviewed here. The use of imaging reagents to visualize protease activity allows for improved detection of various pathologies as well as the ability to monitor the efficacy of therapies in vivo and provide molecular information regarding the nature of the pathology.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18729022
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4475
      1. Author :
        Korotcov, Alexandru; Shan, Liang; Meng, Huan; Wang, Tongxin; Sridhar, Rajagopalan; Zhao, Yuliang; Liang, Xing-Jie; Wang, Paul C
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Journal of nanoscience and nanotechnology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        10
      8. Issue :
        11
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Contrast Media; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Mice; Nanotechnology; PC-3M-luc
      12. Abstract :
        We have developed and tested a liposomal nanocomplex system, which contains Gd-DTPA as a payload and transferrin on the surface, as a tumor specific targeting MRI contrast agent for studying prostate cancer tumors in mice. In vivo, the probe significantly enhanced the MRI signal. The image contrast between the peripheral region of the tumor and the non-involved muscle was nearly 50% higher two hours after administration of the nanocomplex. The liposomal nanocomplex increased the amount of Gd accumulated in tumors by factor 2.8 compared to that accumulated by using Magnevist alone. Moreover, the heterogeneous MRI image features correlate well with the tumor pathology. The image enhancement patterns can be used for cancer prognosis and non-invasive monitoring of the response to therapy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21137979
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8963
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Microbes and infection / Institut Pasteur
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        10
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bacterial Proteins; Biofilms; Bioware; Catheterization, Central Venous; Male; Mice; Point Mutation; Sigma Factor; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Virulence; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        The impact of the alternative sigma factor sigma B (SigB) on pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus is not conclusively clarified. In this study, a central venous catheter (CVC) related model of multiorgan infection was used to investigate the role of SigB for the pathogenesis of S. aureus infections and biofilm formation in vivo. Analysis of two SigB-positive wild-type strains and their isogenic mutants revealed uniformly that the wild-type was significantly more virulent than the SigB-deficient mutant. The observed difference in virulence was apparently not linked to the capability of the strains to form biofilms in vivo since wild-type and mutant strains were able to produce biofilm layers inside of the catheter. The data strongly indicate that the alternative sigma factor SigB plays a role in CVC-associated infections caused by S. aureus.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18328762
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9046
      1. Author :
        Okuda, Tomoyuki; Kawaguchi, Yasuhisa; Okamoto, Hirokazu
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Current topics in medicinal chemistry
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        9
      8. Issue :
        12
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Bioware; Gene Silencing; PC-3M-luc; Peptides; Proteins; RNA Interference; Transfection
      12. Abstract :
        RNA interference (RNAi) is an attractive phenomenon for practical use that specifically inhibits gene expression and is carried out by small double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) including small interfering RNA (siRNA) or short hairpin RNA (shRNA). In addition, RNAi is of great interest for clinical use to cure refractory diseases related to the expression of a specific gene. To achieve gene silencing in the body, a sufficient amount of dsRNA must be delivered and internalized into target cells. However, dsRNAs have a large molecular weight and net negative charge, which limits their membrane-permeating ability. Moreover, dsRNAs are rapidly degraded by endonucleses in the body. Therefore, for the efficient delivery of dsRNAs, many approaches based on drug delivery systems have been carried out. In this review, we focus on recent reports about the application of functional peptides and proteins designed for the efficient delivery of dsRNAs.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19860710
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8962
      1. Author :
        Mitchell, Dianne; Pobre, Eileen G; Mulivor, Aaron W; Grinberg, Asya V; Castonguay, Roselyne; Monnell, Travis E; Solban, Nicolas; Ucran, Jeffrey A; Pearsall, R Scott; Underwood, Kathryn W; Seehra, Jasbir; Kumar, Ravindra
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Molecular cancer therapeutics
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        9
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Activin Receptors, Type II; Animals; Bioware; Bone Morphogenetic Proteins; CHO Cells; Cricetinae; Cricetulus; Endothelial Cells; Endothelium, Vascular; Growth Differentiation Factor 2; Humans; MCF-7-luc-F5 cells; Mice; Neoplasms; Neovascularization, Pathologic; Surface Plasmon Resonance; Telangiectasia, Hereditary Hemorrhagic
      12. Abstract :
        Activin receptor-like kinase-1 (ALK1) is a type I, endothelial cell-specific member of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily of receptors known to play an essential role in modulating angiogenesis and vessel maintenance. In the present study, we sought to examine the angiogenic and tumorigenic effects mediated upon the inhibition of ALK1 signaling using a soluble chimeric protein (ALK1-Fc). Of 29 transforming growth factor-beta-related ligands screened by surface plasmon resonance, only bone morphogenetic protein (BMP9) and BMP10 displayed high-affinity binding to ALK1-Fc. In cell-based assays, ALK1-Fc inhibited BMP9-mediated Id-1 expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and inhibited cord formation by these cells on a Matrigel substrate. In a chick chorioallantoic membrane assay, ALK1-Fc reduced vascular endothelial growth factor-, fibroblast growth factor-, and BMP10-mediated vessel formation. The growth of B16 melanoma explants was also inhibited significantly by ALK1-Fc in this assay. Finally, ALK1-Fc treatment reduced tumor burden in mice receiving orthotopic grafts of MCF7 mammary adenocarcinoma cells. These data show the efficacy of chimeric ALK1-Fc proteins in mitigating vessel formation and support the view that ALK1-Fc is a powerful antiangiogenic agent capable of blocking vascularization.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20124460
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9010
      1. Author :
        Shimomura, Toshiyasu; Hasako, Shinichi; Nakatsuru, Yoko; Mita, Takashi; Ichikawa, Koji; Kodera, Tsutomu; Sakai, Takumi; Nambu, Tadahiro; Miyamoto, Mayu; Takahashi, Ikuko; Miki, Satomi; Kawanishi, Nobuhiko; Ohkubo, Mitsuru; Kotani, Hidehito; Iwasawa, Yoshikazu
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Molecular cancer therapeutics
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        9
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols; Bioware; Cell Death; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Proliferation; Cyclohexanecarboxylic Acids; HeLa-luc; Humans; Inhibitory Concentration 50; Mice; Mitosis; Protein kinase inhibitors; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases; Rats; Taxoids; Thiazoles; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Aurora-A kinase is a one of the key regulators during mitosis progression. Aurora-A kinase is a potential target for anticancer therapies because overexpression of Aurora-A, which is frequently observed in some human cancers, results in aberrant mitosis leading to chromosomal instability and possibly tumorigenesis. MK-5108 is a novel small molecule with potent inhibitory activity against Aurora-A kinase. Although most of the Aurora-kinase inhibitors target both Aurora-A and Aurora-B, MK-5108 specifically inhibited Aurora-A kinase in a panel of protein kinase assays. Inhibition of Aurora-A by MK-5108 in cultured cells induced cell cycle arrest at the G(2)-M phase in flow cytometry analysis. The effect was confirmed by the accumulation of cells with expression of phosphorylated Histone H3 and inhibition of Aurora-A autophosphorylation by immunostaining assays. MK-5108 also induced phosphorylated Histone H3 in skin and xenograft tumor tissues in a nude rat xenograft model. MK-5108 inhibited growth of human tumor cell lines in culture and in different xenograft models. Furthermore, the combination of MK-5108 and docetaxel showed enhanced antitumor activities compared with control and docetaxel alone-treated animals without exacerbating the adverse effects of docetaxel. MK-5108 is currently tested in clinical trials and offers a new therapeutic approach to combat human cancers as a single agent or in combination with existing taxane therapies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20053775
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9006
      1. Author :
        Tai, Chien-Hsuan; Hsiung, Suz-Kai; Chen, Chih-Yuan; Tsai, Mei-Lin; Lee, Gwo-Bin
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Biomedical microdevices
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        9
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        A549-luc-C8 cells; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Nucleus; Cell Separation; Electrophoresis; Humans; Microfluidic Analytical Techniques
      12. Abstract :
        This study reports a new biochip capable of cell separation and nucleus collection utilizing dielectrophoresis (DEP) forces in a microfluidic system comprising of micropumps and microvalves, operating in an automatic format. DEP forces operated at a low voltage (15 Vp-p) and at a specific frequency (16 MHz) can be used to separate cells in a continuous flow, which can be subsequently collected. In order to transport the cell samples continuously, a serpentine-shape (S-shape) pneumatic micropump device was constructed onto the chip device to drive the samples flow through the microchannel, which was activated by the pressurized air injection. The mixed cell samples were first injected into an inlet reservoir and driven through the DEP electrodes to separate specific samples. Finally, separated cell samples were collected individually in two outlet reservoirs controlled by microvalves. With the same operation principle, the nucleus of the specific cells can be collected after the cell lysis procedure. The pumping rate of the micropump was measured to be 39.8 microl/min at a pressure of 25 psi and a driving frequency of 28 Hz. For the cell separation process, the initial flow rate was 3 microl/min provided by the micropump. A throughput of 240 cells/min can be obtained by using the developed device. The DEP electrode array, microchannels, micropumps and microvalves are integrated on a microfluidic chip using micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) technology to perform several crucial procedures including cell transportation, separation and collection. The dimensions of the integrated chip device were measured to be 6x7 cm. By integrating an S-shape pump and pneumatic microvalves, different cells are automatically transported in the microchannel, separated by the DEP forces, and finally sorted to specific chambers. Experimental data show that viable and non-viable cells (human lung cancer cell, A549-luc-C8) can be successfully separated and collected using the developed microfluidic platform. The separation accuracy, depending on the DEP operating mode used, of the viable and non-viable cells are measured to be 84 and 81%, respectively. In addition, after cell lysis, the nucleus can be also collected using a similar scheme. The developed automatic microfluidic platform is useful for extracting nuclear proteins from living cells. The extracted nuclear proteins are ready for nuclear binding assays or the study of nuclear proteins.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17508288
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9005
      1. Author :
        Heit, Bryan; Robbins, Stephen M; Downey, Charlene M; Guan, Zhiwen; Colarusso, Pina; Miller, B Joan; Jirik, Frank R; Kubes, Paul
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Nature immunology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        9
      8. Issue :
        7
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Arthritis, Experimental; Bioware; Chemotaxis, Leukocyte; Humans; Inflammation; Mice; Mice, Transgenic; Neutrophils; p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases; Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases; Phosphatidylinositol Phosphates; Protein Transport; PTEN Phosphohydrolase; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Neutrophils encounter and 'prioritize' many chemoattractants in their pursuit of bacteria. Here we tested the possibility that the phosphatase PTEN is responsible for the prioritization of chemoattractants. Neutrophils induced chemotaxis by two separate pathways, the phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI(3)K) phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) pathway, and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, with the p38 pathway dominating over the PI(3)K pathway. Pten(-/-) neutrophils could not prioritize chemoattractants and were 'distracted' by chemokines when moving toward bacterial chemoattractants. In opposing gradients, PTEN became distributed throughout the cell circumference, which inhibited all PI(3)K activity, thus permitting 'preferential' migration toward bacterial products via phospholipase A(2) and p38. Such prioritization was defective in Pten(-/-) neutrophils, which resulted in defective bacterial clearance in vivo. Our data identify a PTEN-dependent mechanism in neutrophils to prioritize, 'triage' and integrate responses to multiple chemotactic cues.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18536720
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9048
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