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      1. Author :
        Takeshita, Fumitaka; Patrawala, Lubna; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Takahashi, Ryou-u; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Kawamata, Masaki; Kelnar, Kevin; Bader, Andreas G; Brown, David; Ochiya, Takahiro
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Molecular therapy: the journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        18
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aged; Animals; Bioware; Cell Cycle Proteins; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Proliferation; Down-Regulation; Humans; Male; Mice; MicroRNAs; Middle Aged; PC-3M-luc; Prostatic Neoplasms; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
      12. Abstract :
        Recent reports have linked the expression of specific microRNAs (miRNAs) with tumorigenesis and metastasis. Here, we show that microRNA (miR)-16, which is expressed at lower levels in prostate cancer cells, affects the proliferation of human prostate cancer cell lines both in vitro and in vivo. Transient transfection with synthetic miR-16 significantly reduced cell proliferation of 22Rv1, Du145, PPC-1, and PC-3M-luc cells. A prostate cancer xenograft model revealed that atelocollagen could efficiently deliver synthetic miR-16 to tumor cells on bone tissues in mice when injected into tail veins. In the therapeutic bone metastasis model, injection of miR-16 with atelocollagen via tail vein significantly inhibited the growth of prostate tumors in bone. Cell model studies indicate that miR-16 likely suppresses prostate tumor growth by regulating the expression of genes such as CDK1 and CDK2 associated with cell-cycle control and cellular proliferation. There is a trend toward lower miR-16 expression in human prostate tumors versus normal prostate tissues. Thus, this study indicates the therapeutic potential of miRNA in an animal model of cancer metastasis with systemic miRNA injection and suggest that systemic delivery of miR-16 could be used to treat patients with advanced prostate cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19738602
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8947
      1. Author :
        Shan, Liang; Wang, Songping; Korotcov, Alexandru; Sridhar, Rajagopalan; Wang, Paul C
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Ethnicity & disease
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        18
      8. Issue :
        2 Suppl 2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Breast Neoplasms; Disease Models, Animal; Humans; Luciferases; Luminescent Measurements; Lung Neoplasms; Mammary Neoplasms, Animal; MDA-MB-231-D3H1 cells; Mice; Mice, Nude; Tumor Cells, Cultured
      12. Abstract :
        INTRODUCTION Convenient animal models are needed to study the progression and treatment of human tumors in vivo. Luciferase-based bioluminescent imaging (BLI) enables researchers to monitor tumors noninvasively and is sensitive to subtle changes in tumors. METHODS Three human breast cancer models in nude mice were established by using luciferase-expressing MDA-MB-231-luc cells. They were subcutaneous xenografts (n = 8), mammary gland xenografts (n = 5), and lung metastases (n = 3). The tumors were imaged in live mice by using a highly sensitive BLI system. The relationship between the intensity of bioluminescence from the tumor was analyzed with respect to tumor volume. Bioluminescent signals from lung metastases were studied to determine the threshold of detectability. RESULTS Tumors growing in the mice's backs and mammary gland fat pads were imaged dynamically after administration of D-luciferin. The bioluminescent intensity from the tumors gradually increased and then decreased in a one-hour span. The time to reach maximum signal intensity differed significantly among tumors and was independent of tumor volume and unrelated to maximum signal intensity. A significant correlation was observed between tumor volume and maximum signal intensity in tumors from both sites. Lung metastatic lesions of .3-.5 mm in diameter were clearly detectable through the entire animal imaging process. CONCLUSION The animal models established with luciferase-expressing cancer cells in combination with BLI provide a system for rapid, noninvasive, and quantitative analysis of tumor biomass and metastasis. This biosystem simplifies in vivo monitoring of tumors and will be useful for noninvasive investigation of tumor growth and response to therapy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18646323
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8991
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Brazilian dental journal
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        18
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Colony Count, Microbial; Cuspid; Dental Pulp Cavity; Disinfectants; Drug Combinations; Genetic Engineering; Humans; Hydrogen peroxide; Incisor; Luminescent Measurements; Luminescent Proteins; Maxilla; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Root Canal Irrigants; Root Canal Preparation; Sensitivity and Specificity; Sodium Hypochlorite; Xen5
      12. Abstract :
        Microbial infection plays an important role in the development of pulp necrosis and formation of periapical lesions. In vitro and in vivo research in this field, traditionally microbiological culture methods using paper point sampling and quantitative culture, faces difficulties in completely removing bacteria from the root canal system and analyzing sequential procedures. This study employed genetically engineered bioluminescent bacteria and a light-sensitive imaging system to allow real-time visualization of the infection. Ten extracted teeth incubated with P. aeruginosa were treated by mechanical instrumentation with K-files (#30 K-file, #35 K-file and #40 K-file) and chemical irrigation with sodium hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide. Irrigation alone reduced the contamination in 18%; the first chemomechanical sequence (instrumentation with a #30 K-file + irrigation) provided 41% of reduction; the second sequence (#35 K-file + irrigation) achieved 62%; and the complete therapy (#30 K-file + #35 K-file + #40 K-file + irrigation) achieved 93% of bacterial reduction. These results suggest that the endodontic treatment is dependent on the association of a chemical and mechanical approaches and that root canal enlargement improves bacterial reduction probably because the irrigation has more access to the apical third.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18176710
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9998
      1. Author :
        Emmett, M. S.; Lanati, S.; Dunn, D. B.; Stone, O. A.; Bates, D. O.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Microcirculation
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        18
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, B16-F10-luc-G5, B16F10-luc-G5, B16-F10-luc, B16F10-luc,
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVE: To determine whether chemotactic-metastasis, the preferential growth of melanomas towards areas of high lymphatic density, is CCL21/CCR7 dependent in vivo. Lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) produce the chemokine CCL21. Metastatic melanoma cells express CCR7, its receptor, and exhibit chemotactic-metastasis, whereby metastatic cells recognise and grow towards areas of higher lymphatic density. METHODS: We used two in vivo models of directional growth towards depots of LECs of melanoma cells over-expressing CCR7. Injected LEC were tracked by intravital fluorescence microscopy, and melanoma growth by bioluminescence. RESULTS: Over-expression of the chemokine receptor CCR7 enables non-metastatic tumor cells to recognise and grow towards LECs (3.9 fold compared with control), but not blood endothelial cells (0.9 fold), in vitro and in vivo in the absence of increased lymphatic clearance. Chemotactic metastasis was inhibited by a CCL21 neutralising antibody (4-17% of control). Furthermore, CCR7 expression in mouse B16 melanomas resulted in in-transit metastasis (50-100% of mice) that was less often seen with control tumors (0-50%) in vivo. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that recognition of LEC by tumors expressing receptors for lymphatic specific ligands contributes towards the identification and invasion of lymphatics by melanoma cells and provides further evidence for a chemotactic metastasis model of tumor spread.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21166932
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10355
      1. Author :
        Themelis, G.; Harlaar, N. J.; Kelder, W.; Bart, J.; Sarantopoulos, A.; van Dam, G. M.; Ntziachristos, V.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Ann Surg Oncol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        18
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Cell Line, Tumor; *Diagnostic Imaging; Female; Fluorescence; Fluorescent Dyes/*diagnostic use; Humans; Integrin alphaVbeta3/*metabolism; Luciferases/metabolism; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental/*diagnosis/metabolism; Mice; Mice, Nude; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: This study was designed to improve the surgical procedure and outcome of cancer surgery by means of real-time molecular imaging feedback of tumor spread and margin delineation using targeted near-infrared fluorescent probes with specificity to tumor biomarkers. Surgical excision of cancer often is confronted with difficulties in the identification of cancer spread and the accurate delineation of tumor margins. Currently, the assessment of tumor borders is afforded by postoperative pathology or, less reliably, intraoperative frozen sectioning. Fluorescence imaging is a natural modality for intraoperative use by directly relating to the surgeon's vision and offers highly attractive characteristics, such as high-resolution, sensitivity, and portability. Via the use of targeted probes it also becomes highly tumor-specific and can lead to significant improvements in surgical procedures and outcome. METHODS: Mice bearing xenograft human tumors were injected with alphavbeta3-integrin receptor-targeted fluorescent probe and in vivo visualized by using a novel, real-time, multispectral fluorescence imaging system. Confirmatory ex vivo imaging, bioluminescence imaging, and histopathology were used to validate the in vivo findings. RESULTS: Fluorescence images were all in good correspondence with the confirming bioluminescence images in respect to signal colocalization. Fluorescence imaging detected all tumors and successfully guided total tumor excision by effectively detecting small tumor residuals, which occasionally were missed by the surgeon. Tumor tissue exhibited target-to-background ratio of ~4.0, which was significantly higher compared with white-light images representing the visual contrast. Histopathology confirmed the capability of the method to identify tumor negative margins with high specificity and better prediction rate compared with visual inspection. CONCLUSIONS: Real-time multispectral fluorescence imaging using tumor specific molecular probes is a promising modality for tumor excision by offering real time feedback to the surgeon in the operating room.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21509632
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 11
      15. Serial :
        10381
      1. Author :
        Yipp, B. G.; Petri, B.; Salina, D.; Jenne, C. N.; Scott, B. N.; Zbytnuik, L. D.; Pittman, K.; Asaduzzaman, M.; Wu, K.; Meijndert, H. C.; Malawista, S. E.; de Boisfleury Chevance, A.; Zhang, K.; Conly, J.; Kubes, P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Nat Med
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        18
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen8.1, Xen 8.1, S. aureus, IVIS, bioluminescence imaging, Analysis of Variance; Animals; Extracellular Space/*metabolism; Genetic Vectors/genetics; Green Fluorescent Proteins/metabolism; Humans; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Transgenic; Microscopy, Confocal; Microscopy, Electron, Transmission; Microscopy, Fluorescence; Movement/*physiology; Neutrophils/*immunology/metabolism/physiology; Opsonin Proteins/metabolism; Skin Diseases, Bacterial/*immunology/metabolism; Toll-Like Receptor 2/metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are released as neutrophils die in vitro in a process requiring hours, leaving a temporal gap that invasive microbes may exploit. Neutrophils capable of migration and phagocytosis while undergoing NETosis have not been documented. During Gram-positive skin infections, we directly visualized live polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) in vivo rapidly releasing NETs, which prevented systemic bacterial dissemination. NETosis occurred during crawling, thereby casting large areas of NETs. NET-releasing PMNs developed diffuse decondensed nuclei, ultimately becoming devoid of DNA. Cells with abnormal nuclei showed unusual crawling behavior highlighted by erratic pseudopods and hyperpolarization consistent with the nucleus being a fulcrum for crawling. A requirement for both Toll-like receptor 2 and complement-mediated opsonization tightly regulated NET release. Additionally, live human PMNs injected into mouse skin developed decondensed nuclei and formed NETS in vivo, and intact anuclear neutrophils were abundant in Gram-positive human abscesses. Therefore early in infection NETosis involves neutrophils that do not undergo lysis and retain the ability to multitask.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22922410
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10565
      1. Author :
        Tafreshi, N. K.; Bui, M. M.; Bishop, K.; Lloyd, M. C.; Enkemann, S. A.; Lopez, A. S.; Abrahams, D.; Carter, B. W.; Vagner, J.; Grobmyer, S. R.; Gillies, R. J.; Morse, D. L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Clin Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        18
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        VivoTag, IVIS, Vivotag, Animals; Antibodies, Monoclonal/*diagnostic use/immunology/pharmacokinetics; Antigens, Neoplasm/*metabolism; Blotting, Western; Breast/immunology/metabolism/pathology; Breast Neoplasms/*diagnosis/immunology/metabolism; Carbonic Anhydrases/*metabolism; Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/*diagnosis/immunology/metabolism; Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating/*diagnosis/immunology/metabolism; *Diagnostic Imaging; Female; Fluorescent Antibody Technique; Gene Expression Profiling; Humans; Luciferases/metabolism; Luminescent Measurements; Lymphatic Metastasis; Mice; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Invasiveness; Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis; RNA, Messenger/genetics; Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction; Tissue Array Analysis; Tissue Distribution; Tumor Cells, Cultured; Tumor Markers, Biological/genetics/metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        PURPOSE: To develop targeted molecular imaging probes for the noninvasive detection of breast cancer lymph node metastasis. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Six cell surface or secreted markers were identified by expression profiling and from the literature as being highly expressed in breast cancer lymph node metastases. Two of these markers were cell surface carbonic anhydrase isozymes (CAIX and/or CAXII) and were validated for protein expression by immunohistochemistry of patient tissue samples on a breast cancer tissue microarray containing 47 normal breast tissue samples, 42 ductal carcinoma in situ, 43 invasive ductal carcinomas without metastasis, 46 invasive ductal carcinomas with metastasis, and 49 lymph node macrometastases of breast carcinoma. Targeted probes were developed by conjugation of CAIX- and CAXII-specific monoclonal antibodies to a near-infrared fluorescent dye. RESULTS: Together, these two markers were expressed in 100% of the lymph node metastases surveyed. Selectivity of the imaging probes were confirmed by intravenous injection into nude mice-bearing mammary fat pad tumors of marker-expressing cells and nonexpressing cells or by preinjection of unlabeled antibody. Imaging of lymph node metastases showed that peritumorally injected probes detected nodes harboring metastatic tumor cells. As few as 1,000 cells were detected, as determined by implanting, under ultrasound guidance, a range in number of CAIX- and CAXII-expressing cells into the axillary lymph nodes. CONCLUSION: These imaging probes have potential for noninvasive staging of breast cancer in the clinic and elimination of unneeded surgery, which is costly and associated with morbidities.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22016510
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10568
      1. Author :
        J-C Tseng; T Granot; V DiGiacomo; B Levin; D Meruelo
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Gene Therapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        17
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        Sindbis virus; viral vector; vascular leakiness; molecular imaging; chemotherapy; cancer
      12. Abstract :
        Genetic instability of cancer cells generates resistance after initial responses to chemotherapeutic agents. Several oncolytic viruses have been designed to exploit specific signatures of cancer cells, such as important surface markers or pivotal signaling pathways for selective replication. It is less likely for cancer cells to develop resistance given that mutations in these cancer signatures would negatively impact tumor growth and survival. However, as oncolytic viral vectors are large particles, they suffer from inefficient extravasation from tumor blood vessels. Their ability to reach cancer cells is an important consideration in achieving specific oncolytic targeting and potential vector replication. Our previous studies indicated that the Sindbis viral vectors target tumor cells by the laminin receptor. Here, we present evidence that modulating tumor vascular leakiness, using VEGF and/or metronomic chemotherapy regimens, significantly enhances tumor vascular permeability and directly enhances oncolytic Sindbis vector targeting in tumor models. Because host-derived vascular endothelium cells are genetically stable and less likely to develop resistance to chemotherapeutics, a combined metronomic chemotherapeutics and oncolytic vector regimen should provide a new approach for cancer therapy. This mechanism could explain the synergistic treatment outcomes observed in clinical trials of combined therapies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.nature.com/cgt/journal/v17/n4/full/cgt200970a.html
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4485
      1. Author :
        Zhang, H-Y; Man, J-H; Liang, B; Zhou, T; Wang, C-H; Li, T; Li, H-Y; Li, W-H; Jin, B-F; Zhang, P-J; Zhao, J; Pan, X; He, K; Gong, W-L; Zhang, X-M; Li, A-L
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cancer gene therapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        17
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Apoptosis; B16-F10-luc-G5 cells; Bioware; Blotting, Western; Cell Line, Tumor; Escherichia coli; Female; Flow Cytometry; Gene Therapy; Genetic Vectors; Humans; Immunohistochemistry; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mice, Nude; NCI-H460-luc2; Neoplasms; Polymerase Chain Reaction; Survival Rate; TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand
      12. Abstract :
        The tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a potent inducer of tumor cell apoptosis, but concerns of considerable liver toxicity limit its uses in human cancer therapy. Here, we show that i.v. injected Escherichia coli DH5alpha (E. coli DH5alpha) specifically replicates in solid tumors and metastases in live animals. E. coli DH5alpha does not enter tumor cells and suits for being the vector for soluble TRAIL (sTRAIL), which induces apoptosis by activating cell-surface death receptors. With the high 'tumor-targeting' nature, we demonstrate that intratumoral (i.t.) and intravenous injection of sTRAIL-expressing E. coli DH5alpha results in the tumor-targeted release of biologically active molecules, which leads to a dramatic reduction in the tumor growth rate and the prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice. TRAIL delivery by E. coli DH5alpha did not cause any detectable toxicity to any organs, suggesting that E. coli DH5alpha-delivered sTRAIL protein therapy may provide a feasible and effective form of treatment for solid tumors.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20075981
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8944
      1. Author :
        Hickson, J; Ackler, S; Klaubert, D; Bouska, J; Ellis, P; Foster, K; Oleksijew, A; Rodriguez, L; Schlessinger, S; Wang, B; Frost, D
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cell death and differentiation
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        17
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Apoptosis; Bioware; Caspase 3; Cell Line, Tumor; Female; Firefly Luciferin; Humans; Luminescent Agents; MDA-MB-231-D3H2LN cells; Mice; Mice, SCID; SKOV3-luc-D3 cells; Molecular Imaging; Neoplasms; Oligopeptides; Taxoids
      12. Abstract :
        Apoptosis is a highly regulated process of programmed cell death essential for normal physiology. Dysregulation of apoptosis contributes to the development and progression of various diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and chronic heart failure. Quantitative noninvasive imaging of apoptosis in preclinical models would allow for dynamic longitudinal screening of compounds and facilitates a more rapid determination of therapeutic efficacy. In this study, we report the in vivo characterization of Z-DEVD-aminoluciferin, a modified firefly luciferase substrate that in apoptotic cells is cleaved by caspase-3 to liberate aminoluciferin, which can be consumed by luciferase to generate a luminescent signal. In two oncology models, namely SKOV3-luc and MDA-MB-231-luc-LN, at 24, 48, and 72 h after treatment with docetaxel, animals were injected with Z-DEVD-aminoluciferin and bioluminescent images were acquired. Significantly more light was detected at 24 (P<0.05), 48 (P<0.01), and 72 h (P<0.01) in the docetaxel-treated group compared with the vehicle-treated group, with caspase-3 activation at these time points confirmed using immunohistochemistry. Importantly, whereas significant differences between groups were detected as early as 24 h after treatment by molecular imaging, caliper measurements were unable to detect a difference for 4-5 additional days. Taken together, these data show that in vivo imaging of apoptosis using Z-DEVD-aminoluciferin could provide a sensitive and rapid method for early detection of drug efficacy, which could potentially be used by numerous therapeutic programs.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20057500
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8950
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