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      1. Author :
        He, T.; Xue, Z.; Lu, K.; Valdivia y Alvarado, M.; Wong, K. K.; Xie, W.; Wong, S. T.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Comput Med Imaging Graph
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        36
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        N/A
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States, with more than half of the cancers are located peripherally. Computed tomography (CT) has been utilized in the last decade to detect early peripheral lung cancer. However, due to the high false diagnosis rate of CT, further biopsy is often necessary to confirm cancerous cases. This renders intervention for peripheral lung nodules (especially for small peripheral lung cancer) difficult and time-consuming, and it is highly desirable to develop new, on-the-spot earlier lung cancer diagnosis and treatment strategies. PURPOSE: The objective of this study is to develop a minimally invasive multimodality image-guided (MIMIG) intervention system to detect lesions, confirm small peripheral lung cancer, and potentially guide on-the-spot treatment at an early stage. Accurate image guidance and real-time optical imaging of nodules are thus the key techniques to be explored in this work. METHODS: The MIMIG system uses CT images and electromagnetic (EM) tracking to help interventional radiologists target the lesion efficiently. After targeting the lesion, a fiber-optic probe coupled with optical molecular imaging contrast agents is used to confirm the existence of cancerous tissues on-site at microscopic resolution. Using the software developed, pulmonary vessels, airways, and nodules can be segmented and visualized for surgical planning; the segmented results are then transformed onto the intra-procedural CT for interventional guidance using EM tracking. Endomicroscopy through a fiber-optic probe is then performed to visualize tumor tissues. Experiments using IntegriSense 680 fluorescent contrast agent labeling alphavbeta3 integrin were carried out for rabbit lung cancer models. Confirmed cancers could then be treated on-the-spot using radio-frequency ablation (RFA). RESULTS: The prototype system is evaluated using the rabbit VX2 lung cancer model to evaluate the targeting accuracy, guidance efficiency, and performance of molecular imaging. Using this system, we achieved an average targeting accuracy of 3.04 mm, and the IntegriSense signals within the VX2 tumors were found to be at least two-fold higher than those of normal tissues. The results demonstrate great potential for applying the system in human trials in the future if an optical molecular imaging agent is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). CONCLUSIONS: The MIMIG system was developed for on-the-spot interventional diagnosis of peripheral lung tumors by combining image-guidance and molecular imaging. The system can be potentially applied to human trials on diagnosing and treating earlier stage lung cancer. For current clinical applications, where a biopsy is unavoidable, the MIMIG system without contrast agents could be used for biopsy guidance to improve the accuracy and efficiency.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22483054
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 9
      15. Serial :
        10364
      1. Author :
        Liang, H.; Ma, S. Y.; Mohammad, K.; Guise, T. A.; Balian, G.; Shen, F. H.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Spine (Phila Pa 1976)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        36
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-D3H1, MDA-MB-231-luc-D3H1, IVIS, Bioware, Breast Cancer
      12. Abstract :
        STUDY DESIGN: In vivo experiments to develop a rat spine single metastasis model by using human breast cancer cells. OBJECTIVE: To study the survival and tumorigenesis of the human breast cancer cells after transplantation to vertebral body (VB) by intraosseous injection as a model for therapeutic studies of spine metastatic tumor. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: VBs are the most common bones involved in the metastases of breast cancer. To develop experimental therapeutics requires an appropriate animal model. Moreover, it is also important to establish accurate and sensitive detection methods for the evaluation. METHODS: MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells were injected into 3-week-old female athymic rats. The tumorigenesis was assayed with quantitative in vivo bioluminescence (IVIS), microcomputed tomography (micro-CT), quantitative CT (qCT), micro position emission tomography (micro-PET), and histologic studies. RESULTS: A spine single metastasis model of human breast cancer was successfully developed in rats. The IVIS signal intensity from the cancer cells increased after 2 weeks. Signal from the tumor in spine can be detected by micro-PET at day 1. The signal intensity decreased after 1 week and then recovered and continually increased afterwards. Bone destruction was demonstrated in the qCT and micro-CT images. However, both qCT and micro-CT found that the bone density in the cancer cell-injected VB increased before the appearance of osteolysis. The growth of tumor and the reaction of bone in the VB were observed simultaneously by histology. CONCLUSION: A spine single metastasis model was developed by injection of human breast cancer cells into the VB of athymic rats. This is the first report of quantitative evaluation with micro-PET in a spine metastasis model. In addition, the detection of osteogenesis after the introduction of MDA-MB-231 cells in vivo is a novel observation.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21422981
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10515
      1. Author :
        Orihuela, Carlos J; Gao, Geli; McGee, Mackenzie; Yu, Jun; Francis, Kevin P; Tuomanen, Elaine
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2003
      5. Publication :
        Scandinavian journal of infectious diseases
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        35
      8. Issue :
        9
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Lung; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Pneumococcal Infections; pXen-5; Serotyping; Streptococcus pneumoniae, Xen10, Xen7, Xen35
      12. Abstract :
        The variability of the course of infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae is well known but poorly understood. Most animal models of pneumonia, sepsis or meningitis have been forced to use site-specific bacterial inoculation to mimic localized human infection. This study examined the differences in the progression of disease-causing strains D39 (serotype 2), A66.1 (serotype 3) and TIGR4 (serotype 4) using isolates transformed with the Gram-positive lux transposon cassette, Tn4001 luxABCDE Km(r). Expression of the lux operon results in bioluminescence, permitting the detection of the bacteria within a living animal while using a CCD camera. Mice infected intranasally with A66.1 developed only pneumonia, those challenged with D39 experienced high-grade sepsis, while TIGR4 infection resulted in low-grade pneumonia and bacteremia ultimately progressing to meningitis. Quantitative analysis of bacterial titers confirmed these patterns, which were consistent across different lineages of mice. Mice anesthetized with ketamine and xylazine developed more severe forms of the disease compared with isoflurane. These studies unambiguously characterize 3 distinct models of the natural course of pneumococcal infection. Mapping these models provides a framework for detailed molecular modeling of pneumococcal virulence determinants at specific stages of disease.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14620149
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9026
      1. Author :
        Keereweer, S.; Sterenborg, H. J.; Kerrebijn, J. D.; Van Driel, P. B.; de Jong, R. J.; Lowik, C. W.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Head Neck
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        34
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense
      12. Abstract :
        A key aspect for the postoperative prognosis of patients with head and neck cancer is complete tumor resection. In current practice, the intraoperative assessment of the tumor-free margin is dependent on visual appearance and palpation of the tumor. Optical imaging has the potential of traversing the gap between radiology and surgery by providing real-time visualization of the tumor, thereby allowing for image-guided surgery. The use of the near-infrared light spectrum offers 2 essential advantages: increased tissue penetration of light and an increased signal-to-background ratio of contrast agents. In this review, the current practice and limitations of image-guided surgery by optical imaging using intrinsic fluorescence or contrast agents are described. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the various molecular contrast agents targeting specific hallmarks of cancer that have been used in other fields of oncologic surgery, and we describe perspectives on its future use in head and neck cancer surgery.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21284051
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 31
      15. Serial :
        10369
      1. Author :
        Liu, R.; Gilmore, D. M.; Zubris, K. A.; Xu, X.; Catalano, P. J.; Padera, R. F.; Grinstaff, M. W.; Colson, Y. L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2013
      5. Publication :
        Biomaterials
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        34
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-luc-D3H2Ln, D3H2Ln, Bioware, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        Although breast cancer patients with localized disease exhibit an excellent long-term prognosis, up to 40% of patients treated with local resection alone may harbor occult nodal metastatic disease leading to increased locoregional recurrence and decreased survival. Given the potential for targeted drug delivery to result in more efficacious locoregional control with less morbidity, the current study assessed the ability of drug-loaded polymeric expansile nanoparticles (eNP) to migrate from the site of tumor to regional lymph nodes, locally deliver a chemotherapeutic payload, and prevent primary tumor growth as well as lymph node metastases. Expansile nanoparticles entered tumor cells and paclitaxel-loaded eNP (Pax-eNP) exhibited dose-dependent cytotoxicity in vitro and significantly decreased tumor doubling time in vivo against human triple negative breast cancer in both microscopic and established murine breast cancer models. Furthermore, migration of Pax-eNP to axillary lymph nodes resulted in higher intranodal paclitaxel concentrations and a significantly lower incidence of lymph node metastases. These findings demonstrate that lymphatic migration of drug-loaded eNP provides regionally targeted delivery of chemotherapy to both decrease local tumor growth and strategically prevent the development of nodal metastases within the regional tumor-draining lymph node basin.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23228419
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 8
      15. Serial :
        10506
      1. Author :
        Baddour, Ralph E; Dadani, Farhan N; Kolios, Michael C; Bisland, Stuart K
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Journal of biological physics
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        33
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Bioware; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Ultrasound imaging is proving to be an important tool for medical diagnosis of dermatological disease. Backscatter spectral profiles using high-frequency ultrasound (HFUS, 10-100 MHz) are sensitive to subtle changes in eukaryotic cellular morphology and mechanical properties that are indicative of early apoptosis, the main type of cell death induced following photodynamic therapy (PDT). We performed experiments to study whether HFUS could also be used to discern changes in bacteria following PDT treatment. Pellets of planktonic Staphylococcus aureus were treated with different PDT protocols and subsequently interrogated with HFUS. Changes in ultrasound backscatter response were found to correlate with antimicrobial effect. Despite their small size, distinct changes in bacterial morphology that are indicative of cell damage or death are detectable by altered backscatter spectra from bacterial ensembles using HFUS. This highlights the potential for HFUS in rapidly and non-invasively assessing the structural changes related to antimicrobial response.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19669553
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9052
      1. Author :
        Pan, Y.; Zhong, L. J.; Zhou, H.; Wang, X.; Chen, K.; Yang, H. P.; Xiaokaiti, Y.; Maimaiti, A.; Jiang, L.; Li, X. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Acta Pharmacol Sin
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        33
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, B16-F10-luc-G5, B16F10-luc-G5, B16-F10-luc, B16F10-luc, 14-3-3 Proteins/*genetics; Animals; Anticoagulants/pharmacology/*therapeutic use; Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology/*therapeutic use; Apoptosis/drug effects; Cadherins/genetics; Cell Cycle/drug effects; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Proliferation/*drug effects; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/drug effects; Heparin/pharmacology/*therapeutic use; Humans; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Metastasis/drug therapy/genetics; Neoplasms/*drug therapy/genetics; Prostate/drug effects/metabolism; Prostatic Neoplasms/drug therapy/genetics; Transforming Growth Factor beta/genetics; Vimentin/*genetics
      12. Abstract :
        AIM: To investigate the inhibitory effects of heparin on PC-3M cells proliferation in vitro and B16-F10-luc-G5 cells metastasis in Balb/c nude mice and identify the protein expression patterns to elucidate the action mechanism of heparin. METHODS: Human prostate cancer PC-3M cells were incubated with heparin 0.5 to 125 mug/mL for 24 h. The proliferation of PC-3M cells was assessed by MTS assay. BrdU incoporation and Ki67 expression were detected using a high content screening (HCS) assay. The cell cycle and apoptosis of PC-3M cells were tested by flow cytometry. B16-F10-luc-G5 cardinoma cells were injected into the lateral tail vein of 6-week old male Balb/c nude mice and heparin 30 mg/kg was administered iv 30 min before and 24 h after injection. The metasis of B16-F10-luc-G5 cells was detected by bioluminescence assay. Activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and hemorheological parameters were measured on d 14 after injection of B16-F10-luc-G5 carcinoma cells in Balb/c mice. The global protein changes in PC-3M cells and frozen lung tissues from mice burdened with B16-F10-luc-G5 cells were determined by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and image analysis. The protein expression of vimentin and 14-3-3 zeta/delta was measured by Western blot. The mRNA transcription of vimentin, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta, E-cadherin, and alpha(v)-integrin was measured by RT-PCR. RESULTS: Heparin 25 and 125 mug/mL significantly inhibited the proliferation, arrested the cells in G(1) phase, and suppressed BrdU incorporation and Ki67 expression in PC-3M cells compared with the model group. But it had no significant effect on apoptosis of PC-3M cells. Heparin 30 mg/kg markedly inhibits the metastasis of B16-F10-luc-G5 cells on day 8. Additionally, heparin administration maintained relatively normal red blood hematocrit but had no influence on APTT in nude mice burdened with B16-F10-luc-G5 cells. Thirty of down-regulated protein spots were identified after heparin treatment, many of which are related to tumor development, extracellular signaling, energy metabolism, and cellular proliferation. Vimentin and 14-3-3 zeta/delta were identified in common in PC-3M cells and the lungs of mice bearing B16-F10-luc-G5 carcinoma cells. Heparin 25 and 125 mug/mL decreased the protein expression of vimentin and 14-3-3 zeta/delta and the mRNA expression of alpha(v)-integrin. Heparin 125 mug/mL decreased vimentin and E-cadherin mRNA transcription while increased TGF-beta mRNA transcription in the PC-3M cells, but the differences were not significant. Transfection of vimentin-targeted siRNA for 48 h significantly decreased the BrdU incoporation and Ki67 expression in PC-3M cells. CONCLUSION: Heparin inhibited PC-3M cell proliferation in vitro and B16-F10-luc-G5 cells metastasis in nude mice by inhibition of vimentin, 14-3-3 zeta/delta, and alpha(v)-integrin expression.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22669117
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 13
      15. Serial :
        10534
      1. Author :
        Minakuchi, Yoshiko; Takeshita, Fumitaka; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Sasaki, Hideo; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Kouno, Makiko; Honma, Kimi; Nagahara, Shunji; Hanai, Koji; Sano, Akihiko; Kato, Takashi; Terada, Masaaki; Ochiya, Takahiro
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2004
      5. Publication :
        Nucleic acids research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        32
      8. Issue :
        13
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; B16-F10-luc-G5 cells; Bioware; Cell Division; Cell Line, Tumor; Collagen; Humans; Injections; Male; Mice; Mice, Nude; RNA Interference; RNA Stability; RNA, Small Interfering; Testicular Neoplasms; Transduction, Genetic; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Silencing gene expression by siRNAs is rapidly becoming a powerful tool for the genetic analysis of mammalian cells. However, the rapid degradation of siRNA and the limited duration of its action call for an efficient delivery technology. Accordingly, we describe here that Atelocollagen complexed with siRNA is resistant to nucleases and is efficiently transduced into cells, thereby allowing long-term gene silencing. Site-specific in vivo administration of an anti-luciferase siRNA/Atelocollagen complex reduced luciferase expression in a xenografted tumor. Furthermore, Atelocollagen-mediated transfer of siRNA in vivo showed efficient inhibition of tumor growth in an orthotopic xenograft model of a human non-seminomatous germ cell tumor. Thus, for clinical applications of siRNA, an Atelocollagen-based non-viral delivery method could be a reliable approach to achieve maximal function of siRNA in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15272050
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9003
      1. Author :
        Motohara, T.; Masuko, S.; Ishimoto, T.; Yae, T.; Onishi, N.; Muraguchi, T.; Hirao, A.; Matsuzaki, Y.; Tashiro, H.; Katabuchi, H.; Saya, H.; Nagano, O.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Carcinogenesis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        32
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Antigens, Neoplasm/genetics/metabolism; Apoptosis; Blotting, Western; Cell Adhesion; Cell Adhesion Molecules/genetics/metabolism; Cell Differentiation; Cell Movement; Cell Proliferation; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic/metabolism/*pathology; Female; Flow Cytometry; Immunoenzyme Techniques; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Neoplastic Stem Cells/metabolism/*pathology; Ovarian Neoplasms/genetics/metabolism/*pathology; Ovary/metabolism/*pathology; Peritoneal Neoplasms/genetics/metabolism/*secondary; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-myc/genetics/metabolism; Proto-Oncogene Proteins p21(ras)/genetics/metabolism; RNA, Messenger/genetics; RNA, Small Interfering/genetics; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction; Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/antagonists & inhibitors/genetics/*metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        Although the existence of tumor-initiating cells (T-ICs) in several types of human cancer has been documented, the contribution of somatic stem cells to the development of T-ICs has remained unclear. Here, we show that normal mouse ovary contains epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-expressing stem-like cells that possess the ability to differentiate into cytokeratin 8 (CK8)-expressing epithelial progeny cells. Furthermore, RNA interference-mediated transient depletion of the tumor suppressor p53 followed by retrovirus-mediated transfer of c-Myc and K-Ras oncogenes in EpCAM-expressing ovarian stem-like cells resulted in the generation of ovarian T-ICs. The established ovarian T-ICs gave rise to hierarchically organized lethal tumors in vivo and were able to undergo peritoneal metastasis. Finally, subsequent RNA interference-mediated knockdown of p53 in tumor cells triggered the expansion of EpCAM-expressing stem-like tumor cells and induced further tumor growth. These data reveal a role for p53 in the development and expansion of ovarian stem-like tumor cells and subsequent malignant progression.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21828057
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 16
      15. Serial :
        10374
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