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      1. Author :
        Nakayama, H.; Kawase, T.; Okuda, K.; Wolff, L. F.; Yoshie, H.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Acta Radiol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        52
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense,, Animals; Bone Neoplasms/*pathology/physiopathology; Calcification, Physiologic/*physiology; Diphosphonates/diagnostic use; Feasibility Studies; Inositol/analogs & derivatives/diagnostic use; Mice; Mice, Hairless; Osteosarcoma/*pathology/physiopathology; Radiopharmaceuticals/diagnostic use; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared/*methods; Technetium Tc 99m Medronate/analogs & derivatives/diagnostic use; Transplantation, Heterologous
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: In a previous study using a rodent osteosarcoma-grafted rat model, in which cell-dependent mineralization was previously demonstrated to proportionally increase with growth, we performed a quantitative analysis of mineral deposit formation using (99m)Tc-HMDP and found some weaknesses, such as longer acquisition time and narrower dynamic ranges (i.e. images easily saturated). The recently developed near-infrared (NIR) optical imaging technique is expected to non-invasively evaluate changes in living small animals in a quantitative manner. PURPOSE: To test the feasibility of NIR imaging with a dual-channel system as a better alternative for bone scintigraphy by quantitatively evaluating mineralization along with the growth of osteosarcoma lesions in a mouse-xenograft model. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The gross volume and mineralization of osteosarcoma lesions were evaluated in living mice simultaneously with dual-channels by NIR dye-labeled probes, 2-deoxyglucose (DG) and pamidronate (OS), respectively. To verify these quantitative data, retrieved osteosarcoma lesions were then subjected to ex-vivo imaging, weighing under wet conditions, microfocus-computed tomography (muCT) analysis, and histopathological examination. RESULTS: Because of less scattering and no anatomical overlapping, as generally shown, specific fluorescence signals targeted to the osteosarcoma lesions could be determined clearly by ex-vivo imaging. These data were well positively correlated with the in-vivo imaging data (r > 0.8, P < 0.02). Other good to excellent correlations (r > 0.8, P < 0.02) were observed between DG accumulation and tumor gross volume and between OS accumulation and mineralization volume. CONCLUSION: This in-vivo NIR imaging technique using DG and OS is sensitive to the level to simultaneously detect and quantitatively evaluate the growth and mineralization occuring in this type of osteosarcoma lesions of living mice without either invasion or sacrifice. By possible mutual complementation, this dual imaging system might be useful for accurate diagnosis even in the presence of overlapping tissues.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21969703
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 7
      15. Serial :
        10472
      1. Author :
        Mortin, Lawrence I; Li, Tongchuan; Van Praagh, Andrew D G; Zhang, Shuxin; Zhang, Xi-Xian; Alder, Jeff D
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        51
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Acetamides; Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bioware; Colony Count, Microbial; Daptomycin; Female; Luminescent Measurements; Methicillin Resistance; Mice; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Neutropenia; Oxazolidinones; Peritonitis; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        The rising rates of antibiotic resistance accentuate the critical need for new antibiotics. Daptomycin is a new antibiotic with a unique mode of action and a rapid in vitro bactericidal effect against gram-positive organisms. This study examined the kinetics of daptomycin's bactericidal action against peritonitis caused by methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in healthy and neutropenic mice and compared this activity with those of other commonly used antibiotics. CD-1 mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with lethal doses of MSSA (Xen-29) or MRSA (Xen-1), laboratory strains transformed with a plasmid containing the lux operon, which confers bioluminescence. One hour later, the animals were given a single dose of daptomycin at 50 mg/kg of body weight subcutaneously (s.c.), nafcillin at 100 mg/kg s.c., vancomycin at 100 mg/kg s.c., linezolid at 100 mg/kg via gavage (orally), or saline (10 ml/kg s.c.). The mice were anesthetized hourly, and photon emissions from living bioluminescent bacteria were imaged and quantified. The luminescence in saline-treated control mice either increased (neutropenic mice) or remained relatively unchanged (healthy mice). In contrast, by 2 to 3 h postdosing, daptomycin effected a 90% reduction of luminescence of MSSA or MRSA in both healthy and neutropenic mice. The activity of daptomycin against both MSSA and MRSA strains was superior to those of nafcillin, vancomycin, and linezolid. Against MSSA peritonitis, daptomycin showed greater and more rapid bactericidal activity than nafcillin or linezolid. Against MRSA peritonitis, daptomycin showed greater and more rapid bactericidal activity than vancomycin or linezolid. The rapid decrease in the luminescent signal in the daptomycin-treated neutropenic mice underscores the potency of this antibiotic against S. aureus in the immune-suppressed host.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17307984
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9050
      1. Author :
        Brand, A. M.; de Kwaadsteniet, M.; Dicks, L. M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Lett Appl Microbiol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        51
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen36, Xen 36, Staphylococcus aureus Xen36, IVIS, Animals; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Nisin/*pharmacology; Peritoneal Cavity/*microbiology; Staphylococcal Infections/*prevention & control; Staphylococcus aureus/*drug effects/growth & development
      12. Abstract :
        AIMS: To determine the ability of nisin F to control systematic infection caused by Staphylococcus aureus, using C57BL/6 mice as a model. METHODS AND RESULTS: Twelve mice were intraperitoneally injected with 1 x 10(8) viable cells of Staph. aureus Xen 36 containing the modified Photorhabdus luminescence luxABCDE operon on plasmid pAUL-A Tn4001. After 4 h, six mice were intraperitoneally injected with 640 arbitrary units (AU) nisin F, and six were injected with sterile saline. Six mice, not infected with Staph. aureus, were treated with nisin F, and six not infected were left untreated. The viability of Staph. aureus Xen 36 was monitored over 48 h by recording photon emission levels. Nisin F suppressed Staph. aureus for 15 min in vivo. No abnormalities were recorded in blood analyses and internal organs of mice treated with nisin F. CONCLUSIONS: Nisin F suppressed the growth of Staph. aureus in the peritoneal cavity for at least 15 min. Re-emergence of Staph. aureus bioluminescence over the next 44 h suggests that nisin F was inactivated, most probably by proteolytic enzymes. SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY: A single dosage of nisin F administered in the peritoneal cavity controlled the growth of Staph. aureus for at least 15 min in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21029139
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10410
      1. Author :
        Matsumoto, K.; Azami, T.; Otsu, A.; Takase, H.; Ishitobi, H.; Tanaka, J.; Miwa, Y.; Takahashi, S.; Ema, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Genesis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        50
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense, Animals; Blood Vessels/embryology/*physiology; Chromosomes, Artificial, Bacterial; Embryo, Mammalian; Endothelial Cells/cytology/metabolism; Endothelium, Vascular/cytology/embryology/metabolism; Female; Founder Effect; Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental; Genes, Reporter; Mice; *Mice, Transgenic; Microscopy, Fluorescence; Morphogenesis/physiology; *Neovascularization, Pathologic; *Neovascularization, Physiologic; Retina/embryology/*physiology; Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/genetics/metabolism; Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-1/genetics/*metabolism; Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2/genetics/metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        Blood vessel development and network patterning are controlled by several signaling molecules, including VEGF, FGF, TGF-ss, and Ang-1,2. Among these, the role of VEGF-A signaling in vessel morphogenesis is best understood. The biological activity of VEGF-A depends on its reaction with specific receptors Flt1 and Flk1. Roles of VEGF-A signaling in endothelial cell proliferation, migration, survival, vascular permeability, and induction of tip cell filopodia have been reported. In this study, we have generated Flt1-tdsRed BAC transgenic (Tg) mice to monitor Flt1 gene expression during vascular development. We show that tdsRed fluorescence is observed within blood vessels of adult mice and embryos, indicative of retinal angiogenesis and tumor angiogenesis. Flt1 expression recapitulated by Flt1-tdsRed BAC Tg mice overlapped well with Flk1, while Flt1 was expressed more abundantly in endothelial cells of large blood vessels such as dorsal aorta and presumptive stalk cells in retina, providing a unique model to study blood vessel development.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22489010
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 10
      15. Serial :
        10437
      1. Author :
        Wensman, H.; Kamgari, N.; Johansson, A.; Grujic, M.; Calounova, G.; Lundequist, A.; Ronnberg, E.; Pejler, G.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Mol Immunol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        50
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        LL/2-luc-M38, LL/2-luc, Lewis Lung Carcinoma, IVIS, Animals; Antigens, CD137/genetics/*immunology; Carcinoma, Lewis Lung/genetics/*immunology/metabolism; Gene Expression Profiling; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/genetics/*immunology; Humans; Immunohistochemistry; Mast Cells/*immunology/metabolism; Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis; Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction; Up-Regulation
      12. Abstract :
        Mast cells (MCs) can have either detrimental or beneficial effects on malignant processes but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we addressed this issue by examining the interaction between Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) cells and MCs. In vivo, LLC tumors caused a profound accumulation of MCs, suggesting that LLC tumors have the capacity to attract MCs. Indeed, transwell migration assays showed that LLC-conditioned medium had chemotactic activity towards MCs, which was blocked by an antibody towards stem cell factor. In order to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms operative in tumor-MC interactions, the effect of LLC on the MC gene expression pattern was examined. As judged by gene array analysis, conditioned medium from LLC cells caused significant upregulation of numerous cell surface receptors and a pro-angiogenic Runx2/VEGF/Dusp5 axis in MCs, the latter in line with a role for MCs in promoting tumor angiogenesis. Among the genes showing the highest extent of upregulation was Tnfrsf9, encoding the anti-tumorigenic protein 4-1BB, suggesting that also anti-tumorigenic factors are induced. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that 4-1BB was upregulated in a transient manner, and it was also shown that tumor cells induce 4-1BB in human MCs. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that LLC-conditioned medium induced 4-1BB also at the protein level. Together, this study provides novel insight into the molecular events associated with MC-tumor interactions and suggests that tumor cells induce both pro- and anti-tumorigenic responses in MCs.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22343053
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10546
      1. Author :
        Yun, M.; Pan, S.; Jiang, S. N.; Nguyen, V. H.; Park, S. H.; Jung, C. H.; Kim, H. S.; Min, J. J.; Choy, H. E.; Hong, Y.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Microbiol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        50
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen26, Xen 26, Salmonella typhumurium, Animals; Biological Therapy/*methods; Colonic Neoplasms/chemistry/*therapy; Disease Models, Animal; Electrophoresis, Gel, Two-Dimensional; Male; Mass Spectrometry; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Proteome/analysis; Salmonella typhimurium/*growth & development/*pathogenicity
      12. Abstract :
        The use of bacteria has contributed to recent advances in targeted cancer therapy especially for its tumor-specific accumulation and proliferation. In this study, we investigated the molecular events following bacterial therapy using an attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium defective in ppGpp synthesis (DeltappGpp), by analyzing those proteins differentially expressed in tumor tissues from treated and untreated mice. CT26 murine colon cancer cells were implanted in BALB/c mice and allowed to form tumors. The tumor-bearing mice were treated with the attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium. Tumor tissues were analyzed by 2D-PAGE. Fourteen differentially expressed proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. The analysis revealed that cytoskeletal components, including vimentin, drebrin-like protein, and tropomyosin-alpha 3, were decreased while serum proteins related to heme or iron metabolism, including transferrin, hemopexin, and haptoglobin were increased. Subsequent studies revealed that the decrease in cytoskeletal components occurred at the transcriptional level and that the increase in heme and iron metabolism proteins occurred in liver. Most interestingly, the same pattern of increased expression of transferrin, hemopexin, and haptoglobin was observed following radiotherapy at the dosage of 14 Gy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22752915
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10561
      1. Author :
        Lorentzen, D.; Durairaj, L.; Pezzulo, A. A.; Nakano, Y.; Launspach, J.; Stoltz, D. A.; Zamba, G.; McCray, P. B., Jr.; Zabner, J.; Welsh, M. J.; Nauseef, W. M.; Banfi, B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Free Radic Biol Med
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        50
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen8.1, Xen 8.1, S. aureus, IVIS, bioluminescence imaging
      12. Abstract :
        A recently discovered enzyme system produces antibacterial hypothiocyanite (OSCN(-)) in the airway lumen by oxidizing the secreted precursor thiocyanate (SCN(-)). Airway epithelial cultures have been shown to secrete SCN(-) in a CFTR-dependent manner. Thus, reduced SCN(-) availability in the airway might contribute to the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF), a disease caused by mutations in the CFTR gene and characterized by an airway host defense defect. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing the SCN(-) concentration in the nasal airway surface liquid (ASL) of CF patients and non-CF subjects and in the tracheobronchial ASL of CFTR-DeltaF508 homozygous pigs and control littermates. In the nasal ASL, the SCN(-) concentration was ~30-fold higher than in serum independent of the CFTR mutation status of the human subject. In the tracheobronchial ASL of CF pigs, the SCN(-) concentration was somewhat reduced. Among human subjects, SCN(-) concentrations in the ASL varied from person to person independent of CFTR expression, and CF patients with high SCN(-) levels had better lung function than those with low SCN(-) levels. Thus, although CFTR can contribute to SCN(-) transport, it is not indispensable for the high SCN(-) concentration in ASL. The correlation between lung function and SCN(-) concentration in CF patients may reflect a beneficial role for SCN(-).
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21334431
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10564
      1. Author :
        Luker, G.D.; Luker, K.E.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Nuclear Medicine: Official Publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        49
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Clinical Medicine; Contrast Media; Diagnostic Imaging; Fluorescence; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; in vivo; in vivo imaging; Luminescent Measurements; Mice; Neoplasm Metastasis; Neoplasms; Optics and Photonics; Peptide Hydrolases; Rats; Signal Transduction; Software; Tomography, Optical
      12. Abstract :
        Optical techniques, such as bioluminescence and fluorescence, are emerging as powerful new modalities for molecular imaging in disease and therapy. Combining innovative molecular biology and chemistry, researchers have developed optical methods for imaging a variety of cellular and molecular processes in vivo, including protein interactions, protein degradation, and protease activity. Whereas optical imaging has been used primarily for research in small-animal models, there are several areas in which optical molecular imaging will translate to clinical medicine. In this review, we summarize recent advances in optical techniques for molecular imaging and the potential impact for clinical medicine.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18077528
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 7444
      15. Serial :
        4477
      1. Author :
        Xiong, Y. Q.; Willard, J.; Kadurugamuwa, J. L.; Yu, J.; Francis, K. P.; Bayer, A. S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        49
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen; Bioware; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Therapeutic options for invasive Staphylococcus aureus infections have become limited due to rising antimicrobial resistance, making relevant animal model testing of new candidate agents more crucial than ever. In the present studies, a rat model of aortic infective endocarditis (IE) caused by a bioluminescently engineered, biofilm-positive S. aureus strain was used to evaluate real-time antibiotic efficacy directly. This strain was vancomycin and cefazolin susceptible but gentamicin resistant. Bioluminescence was detected and quantified daily in antibiotic-treated and control animals with IE, using a highly sensitive in vivo imaging system (IVIS). Persistent and increasing cardiac bioluminescent signals (BLS) were observed in untreated animals. Three days of vancomycin therapy caused significant reductions in both cardiac BLS (>10-fold versus control) and S. aureus densities in cardiac vegetations (P < 0.005 versus control). However, 3 days after discontinuation of vancomycin therapy, a greater than threefold increase in cardiac BLS was observed, indicating relapsing IE (which was confirmed by quantitative culture). Cefazolin resulted in modest decreases in cardiac BLS and bacterial densities. These microbiologic and cardiac BLS differences during therapy correlated with a longer time-above-MIC for vancomycin (>12 h) than for cefazolin (?4 h). Gentamicin caused neither a reduction in cardiac S. aureus densities nor a reduction in BLS. There were significant correlations between cardiac BLS and S. aureus densities in vegetations in all treatment groups. These data suggest that bioluminescent imaging provides a substantial advance in the real-time monitoring of the efficacy of therapy of invasive S. aureus infections in live animals.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15743898
      14. Call Number :
        144577
      15. Serial :
        7474
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