1. Resources
  2. Citations Library

Citation Details

You are viewing citation details. You can save or export citation(s) below, access an article, or start a new search.

181–190 of 499 records found matching your query:
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All

Headers act as filters

      1. Author :
        Stangenberg L, Ellson C, Cortez-Retamozo V, Ortiz-Lopez A, Yuan H, Blois J, Smith RA, Yaffe MB, Weissleder R, Benoist C, Mathis D, Josephson L and Mahmood U
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Arthritis and Rheumatism
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        60
      8. Issue :
        8
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Physiology
      11. Keywords :
        ProSense; AngioSense; arthritis; in vivo imaging
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVE: To test a novel self-activating viridin (SAV) prodrug that slowly releases wortmannin, a potent phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor, in a model of antibody-mediated inflammatory arthritis.

        METHODS: The SAV prodrug was administered to K/BxN mice or to C57BL/6 (B6) mice that had been injected with K/BxN serum. Ankle thickness was measured, and histologic changes were scored after a 10-day disease course (serum-transfer arthritis). Protease activity was measured by a near-infrared imaging approach using a cleavable cathepsin-selective probe. Further near-infrared imaging techniques were used to analyze early changes in vascular permeability after serum injection, as well as neutrophil-endothelial cell interactions. Neutrophil functions were assessed using an oxidative burst assay as well as a degranulation assay.

        RESULTS: SAV prevented ankle swelling in mice with serum-transfer arthritis in a dose-dependent manner. It also markedly reduced the extent of other features of arthritis, such as protease activity and histology scores for inflammation and joint erosion. Moreover, SAV was an effective therapeutic agent. The underlying mechanisms for the antiinflammatory activity were manifold. Endothelial permeability after serum injection was reduced, as was firm neutrophil attachment to endothelial cells. Endothelial cell activation by tumor necrosis factor alpha was impeded by SAV, as measured by the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule. Crucial neutrophil functions, such as generation of reactive oxygen species and degranulation of protease-laden vesicles, were decreased by SAV administration.

        CONCLUSION: A novel SAV prodrug proved strongly antiinflammatory in a murine model of antibody-induced inflammatory arthritis. Its activity could be attributed, at least in part, to the inhibition of neutrophil and endothelial cell functions.
      13. URL :
        http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/art.24704/abstract
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4528
      1. Author :
        Scatena, Caroline D; Hepner, Mischa A; Oei, Yoko A; Dusich, Joan M; Yu, Shang-Fan; Purchio, Tony; Contag, Pamela R; Jenkins, Darlene E
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2004
      5. Publication :
        The Prostate
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        59
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Disease Models, Animal; Humans; LnCaP-luc cells; Luciferases; Luminescent Measurements; Male; Mice; Mice, SCID; Neoplasm Metastasis; Phenotype; Plasmids; Prostatic Neoplasms; Transfection; Transplantation, Heterologous; Tumor Cells, Cultured
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND Animal experiments examining hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer using the human LNCaP cell line have been limited to endpoint analyses. To permit longitudinal studies, we generated a luciferase-expressing cell line and used bioluminescent imaging (BLI) to non-invasively monitor the in vivo growth of primary LNCaP tumors and metastasis. METHODS LNCaP.FGC cells were transfected to constitutively express firefly luciferase. LNCaP-luc-M6 cells were tested for bioluminescent signal intensity and hormone responsiveness in vitro. The cells were implanted in subcutaneous and orthotopic sites in SCID-bg mice and imaged over time. RESULTS The LNCaP-luc-M6 cells formed subcutaneous and orthotopic tumors in SCID-bg mice, and nearly all tumor-bearing animals developed pulmonary metastases. Early detection and temporal growth of primary tumors and metastatic lesions was successfully monitored by BLI. CONCLUSIONS The LNCaP-luc-M6 cell line is a bioluminescent, hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cell line applicable for BLI studies to non-invasively monitor subcutaneous and orthotopic prostate tumor growth and metastasis in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15042605
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9015
      1. Author :
        Sottnik, J. L.; U, L. W.'Ren; Thamm, D. H.; Withrow, S. J.; Dow, S. W.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Immunol Immunother
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        59
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals, Chronic Disease, Disease Models, Animal, Immunity, Innate, Killer Cells, Natural/immunology, Macrophages/immunology, Mice, Mice, Inbred C3H, Mice, Inbred Strains, Monocytes/immunology, Neoplasms, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Osteomyelitis/*complications, Osteosarcoma/*complications/*immunology/pathology, Staphylococcal Infections/*complications IVIS, Xenogen, Xen36
      12. Abstract :
        Clinical studies over the past several years have reported that metastasis-free survival times in humans and dogs with osteosarcoma are significantly increased in patients that develop chronic bacterial osteomyelitis at their surgical site. However, the immunological mechanism by which osteomyelitis may suppress tumor growth has not been investigated. Therefore, we used a mouse model of osteomyelitis to assess the effects of bone infection on innate immunity and tumor growth. A chronic Staphylococcal osteomyelitis model was established in C3H mice and the effects of infection on tumor growth of syngeneic DLM8 osteosarcoma were assessed. The effects of infection on tumor angiogenesis and innate immunity, including NK cell and monocyte responses, were assessed. We found that osteomyelitis significantly inhibited the growth of tumors in mice, and that the effect was independent of the infecting bacterial type, tumor type, or mouse strain. Depletion of NK cells or monocytes reversed the antitumor activity elicited by infection. Moreover, infected mice had a significant increase in circulating monocytes and numbers of tumor associated macrophages. Infection suppressed tumor angiogenesis but did not affect the numbers of circulating endothelial cells. Therefore, we concluded that chronic localized bacterial infection could elicit significant systemic antitumor activity dependent on NK cells and macrophages.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=19701748
      14. Call Number :
        143227
      15. Serial :
        5718
      1. Author :
        Sottnik, Joseph L; U'Ren, Lance W; Thamm, Douglas H; Withrow, Stephen J; Dow, Steven W
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cancer immunology, immunotherapy: CII
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        59
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Chronic Disease; Disease Models, Animal; Immunity, Innate; Killer Cells, Natural; Macrophages; Mice; Mice, Inbred C3H; Mice, Inbred Strains; Monocytes; Neoplasms; Neovascularization, Pathologic; Osteomyelitis; Osteosarcoma; Staphylococcal Infections; Xen36
      12. Abstract :
        Clinical studies over the past several years have reported that metastasis-free survival times in humans and dogs with osteosarcoma are significantly increased in patients that develop chronic bacterial osteomyelitis at their surgical site. However, the immunological mechanism by which osteomyelitis may suppress tumor growth has not been investigated. Therefore, we used a mouse model of osteomyelitis to assess the effects of bone infection on innate immunity and tumor growth. A chronic Staphylococcal osteomyelitis model was established in C3H mice and the effects of infection on tumor growth of syngeneic DLM8 osteosarcoma were assessed. The effects of infection on tumor angiogenesis and innate immunity, including NK cell and monocyte responses, were assessed. We found that osteomyelitis significantly inhibited the growth of tumors in mice, and that the effect was independent of the infecting bacterial type, tumor type, or mouse strain. Depletion of NK cells or monocytes reversed the antitumor activity elicited by infection. Moreover, infected mice had a significant increase in circulating monocytes and numbers of tumor associated macrophages. Infection suppressed tumor angiogenesis but did not affect the numbers of circulating endothelial cells. Therefore, we concluded that chronic localized bacterial infection could elicit significant systemic antitumor activity dependent on NK cells and macrophages.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19701748
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9980
      1. Author :
        Elena S. Izmailova; Nancy Paz; Herlen Alencar; Miyoung Chun; Lisa Schopf; Michael Hepperle; Joan H. Lane; Geraldine Harriman; Yajun Xu; Timothy Ocain; Ralph Weissleder; Umar Mahmood; Aileen M. Healy; Bruce Jaffee
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Arthritis and Rheumatism
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        56
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        inflammation; immune response; rheumatoid arthritis; arthritis; in vivo imaging
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVE: The NF-kappaB signaling pathway promotes the immune response in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in rodent models of RA. NF-kappaB activity is regulated by the IKK-2 kinase during inflammatory responses. To elucidate how IKK-2 inhibition suppresses disease development, we used a combination of in vivo imaging, transcription profiling, and histopathology technologies to study mice with antibody-induced arthritis.

        METHODS: ML120B, a potent, small molecule inhibitor of IKK-2, was administered to arthritic animals, and disease activity was monitored. NF-kappaB activity in diseased joints was quantified by in vivo imaging. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate gene expression in joints. Protease-activated near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) in vivo imaging was applied to assess the amounts of active proteases in the joints.

        RESULTS: Oral administration of ML120B suppressed both clinical and histopathologic manifestations of disease. In vivo imaging demonstrated that NF-kappaB activity in inflamed arthritic paws was inhibited by ML120B, resulting in significant suppression of multiple genes in the NF-kappaB pathway, i.e., KC, epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78, JE, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, CD3, CD68, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase 2, matrix metalloproteinase 3, cathepsin B, and cathepsin K. NIRF in vivo imaging demonstrated that ML120B treatment dramatically reduced the amount of active proteases in the joints.

        CONCLUSION: Our data demonstrate that IKK-2 inhibition in the murine model of antibody-induced arthritis suppresses both inflammation and joint destruction. In addition, this study highlights how gene expression profiling can facilitate the identification of surrogate biomarkers of disease activity and treatment response in an experimental model of arthritis.
      13. URL :
        http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/art.22303/abstract
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4511
      1. Author :
        Chauhan, A.; Lebeaux, D.; Ghigo, J. M.; Beloin, C.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrob Agents Chemother
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        56
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen31, Xen 31, MRSA, S. aureus, IVIS, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        Biofilms that develop on indwelling devices are a major concern in clinical settings. While removal of colonized devices remains the most frequent strategy for avoiding device-related complications, antibiotic lock therapy constitutes an adjunct therapy for catheter-related infection. However, currently used antibiotic lock solutions are not fully effective against biofilms, thus warranting a search for new antibiotic locks. Metal-binding chelators have emerged as potential adjuvants due to their dual anticoagulant/antibiofilm activities, but studies investigating their efficiency were mainly in vitro or else focused on their effects in prevention of infection. To assess the ability of such chelators to eradicate mature biofilms, we used an in vivo model of a totally implantable venous access port inserted in rats and colonized by either Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We demonstrate that use of tetrasodium EDTA (30 mg/ml) as a supplement to the gentamicin (5 mg/ml) antibiotic lock solution associated with systemic antibiotics completely eradicated Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial biofilms developed in totally implantable venous access ports. Gentamicin-EDTA lock was able to eliminate biofilms with a single instillation, thus reducing length of treatment. Moreover, we show that this combination was effective for immunosuppressed rats. Lastly, we demonstrate that a gentamicin-EDTA lock is able to eradicate the biofilm formed by a gentamicin-resistant strain of methicillin-resistant S. aureus. This in vivo study demonstrates the potential of EDTA as an efficient antibiotic adjuvant to eradicate catheter-associated biofilms of major bacterial pathogens and thus provides a promising new lock solution.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23027191
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10552
      1. Author :
        Yu, Jun; Wu, Jenny; Francis, Kevin P; Purchio, Tony F; Kadurugamuwa, Jagath L
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        The Journal of antimicrobial chemotherapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        55
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Biofilms; Bioware; Drug Resistance, Bacterial; Mice; Mutation; Rifampin; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVES To investigate in vivo fitness of rifampicin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus mutants in a mouse biofilm model using bioluminescence imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS S. aureus was engineered with a luciferase operon to emit bioluminescence that can be detected in vivo using an IVIS imaging system. Two rifampicin-resistant strains of S. aureus that were previously isolated from animals undergoing rifampicin treatment, S464P (resistant to low concentrations of rifampicin) and H481Y (resistant to high concentrations of rifampicin), were characterized and then compared with their parental strain for in vivo fitness to form biofilm infections in the absence of rifampicin. RESULTS The mutant S464P showed better adaptation to in vivo growth than either the parental strain or H481Y without selective pressure. Six days after implanting pre-colonized catheters, bioluminescent signals were seen from 100% of the catheters coated by the mutant S464P. In comparison, only 83% and 61% of the catheters coated by the parental strain and H481Y, respectively, maintained a signal in vivo. Rifampicin treatment of S464P biofilms in vivo resulted in a slight decline, but earlier rebound in bioluminescence from these catheters compared with the parental signal, whereas rifampicin had no affect on bioluminescence in mice infected with mutant H481Y. CONCLUSIONS The mutant with low-level rifampicin resistance appears to be better adapted to in vivo growth than the mutant that has high-level rifampicin resistance. Moreover, the former mutant may actually have a slight competitive advantage over the rifampicin-susceptible strain (parental), raising awareness for the occurrence of such strains in clinical environments.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15743898
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9055
      1. Author :
        Missbach-Guentner, J.; Hunia, J.; Alves, F.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Int J Dev Biol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        55
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Angiogenesis Inhibitors/therapeutic use; Animals; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Fluorescence; Humans; Luminescence/diagnostic use; Magnetic Resonance Angiography/methods; Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods; Microscopy/methods; Neoplasms/*blood supply/therapy; *Neovascularization, Pathologic/pathology/ultrasonography; Positron-Emission Tomography/methods; Tomography/methods; Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon/methods; Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods; X-Ray Microtomography/methods
      12. Abstract :
        Significant advances have been made in understanding the role of tumor angiogenesis and its influence on tumor progression in cancer. Based on this knowledge, a series of inhibitors of angiogenesis have been developed and evaluated in preclinical and clinical trials. Since detailed information of tumor progression in response to therapy is important to assess the efficacy of anti-tumor treatment in vivo, noninvasive imaging techniques emerge more and more as important tools to monitor alterations in tumor growth and vessel recruitment, as well as metastatic spread over time. So far, remarkable efforts have been made to improve the technical capability of these imaging modalities based on better resolution, as well as to implement multimodal approaches combining molecular with anatomical information. Advanced imaging techniques not only allow the detection and monitoring of tumor development, but also facilitate a broad understanding of the cellular and molecular events that propagate tumor angiogenesis, as well as those occurring in response to therapy. This review provides an overview of different imaging techniques in preclinical settings of oncological research and discusses their potential impact on clinical translation. Imaging modalities will be presented that have been implemented to address key biological issues by exploring tumor angiogenic processes and evaluating antiangiogenic therapy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21858774
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 32
      15. Serial :
        10373
      1. Author :
        Ketonis, C.; Barr, S.; Adams, C. S.; Shapiro, I. M.; Parvizi, J.; Hickok, N. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrob Agents Chemother
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        55
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen36, Xen 36, Staphylococcus aureus Xen36, IVIS, Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry/*pharmacology; Bacterial Adhesion/drug effects; Biofilms/drug effects/growth & development; *Bone Transplantation; Bone and Bones/*chemistry/*microbiology; Cell Adhesion/drug effects; Cell Line; Colony Count, Microbial; Humans; Microscopy, Confocal; Osteoblasts/cytology; Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects/*growth & development/physiology; Vancomycin/chemistry/*pharmacology
      12. Abstract :
        Infection is an important medical problem associated with the use of bone allografts. To retard bacterial colonization, we have recently reported on the modification of bone allografts with the antibiotic vancomycin (VAN). In this report, we examine the ability of this antibiotic-modified allograft to resist bacterial colonization and biofilm formation. When antibiotic was coupled to the allograft, a uniform distribution of the antibiotic was apparent. Following challenges with Staphylococcus aureus for 6 h, the covalently bonded VAN decreased colonization as a function of inoculum, ranging from 0.8 to 2.0 log(10) CFU. Furthermore, the VAN-modified surface resisted biofilm formation, even in topographical niches that provide a protected environment for bacterial adhesion. Attachment of the antibiotic to the allograft surface was robust, and the bonded VAN was stable whether incubated in aqueous media or in air, maintaining levels of 75 to 100% of initial levels over 60 days. While the VAN-modified allograft inhibited the Gram-positive S. aureus colonization, in keeping with VAN's spectrum of activity, the VAN-modified allograft was readily colonized by the Gram-negative Escherichia coli. Finally, initial toxicity measures indicated that the VAN-modified allograft did not influence osteoblast colonization or viability. Since the covalently tethered antibiotic is stable, is active, retains its specificity, and does not exhibit toxicity, it is concluded that this modified allograft holds great promise for decreasing bone graft-associated infections.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21098245
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 8
      15. Serial :
        10408
      1. Author :
        Bucki, Robert; Leszczynska, Katarzyna; Byfield, Fitzroy J; Fein, David E; Won, Esther; Cruz, Katrina; Namiot, Andrzej; Kulakowska, Alina; Namiot, Zbigniew; Savage, Paul B; Diamond, Scott L; Janmey, Paul A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        54
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Anti-Inflammatory Agents; Bacterial Infections; Biofilms; Cathelicidins; Cattle; Cells, Cultured; Dexamethasone; Drug Design; Humans; Interleukins; Macrophages; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Neutrophils; Phagocytosis; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Receptors, Glucocorticoid; Spermine; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen5
      12. Abstract :
        The rising number of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains represents an emerging health problem that has motivated efforts to develop new antibacterial agents. Endogenous cationic antibacterial peptides (CAPs) that are produced in tissues exposed to the external environment are one model for the design of novel antibacterial compounds. Here, we report evidence that disubstituted dexamethasone-spermine (D2S), a cationic corticosteroid derivative initially identified as a by-product of synthesis of dexamethasone-spermine (DS) for the purpose of improving cellular gene delivery, functions as an antibacterial peptide-mimicking molecule. This moiety exhibits bacterial killing activity against clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa present in cystic fibrosis (CF) sputa, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm. Although compromised in the presence of plasma, D2S antibacterial activity resists the proteolytic activity of pepsin and is maintained in ascites, cerebrospinal fluid, saliva, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. D2S also enhances S. aureus susceptibility to antibiotics, such as amoxicillin (AMC), tetracycline (T), and amikacin (AN). Inhibition of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 release from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- or lipoteichoic acid (LTA)-treated neutrophils in the presence of D2S suggests that this molecule might also prevent systemic inflammation caused by bacterial wall products. D2S-mediated translocation of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in bovine aorta endothelial cells (BAECs) suggests that some of its anti-inflammatory activities involve engagement of glucocorticoid receptors. The combined antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities of D2S suggest its potential as an alternative to natural CAPs in the prevention and treatment of some bacterial infections.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20308375
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9996
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All