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      1. Author :
        Woods, Nicholas T; Yamaguchi, Hirohito; Lee, Francis Y; Bhalla, Kapil N; Wang, Hong-Gang
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Cancer research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        67
      8. Issue :
        22
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anoikis; Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins; bcl-2-Associated X Protein; Bioware; Caspase 3; Cell Line, Tumor; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic; Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3; Humans; L-Lactate Dehydrogenase; MDA-MB-231-D3H2LN cells; Membrane Proteins; Mice; Neoplasm Metastasis; Neoplasm Proteins; NIH 3T3 Cells; Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases; Proto-Oncogene Proteins; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2
      12. Abstract :
        Anoikis, a Bax-dependent apoptosis triggered by detachment from the extracellular matrix, is often dysfunctional in metastatic cancer cells. Using wild-type and c-Src-transformed NIH3T3 cells as a model, we identified Mcl-1 degradation and Bim up-regulation as a critical determinant of anoikis initiation. Detachment rapidly degraded Mcl-1 via a GSK-3beta-dependent proteasomal pathway and transcriptionally up-regulated Bim expression. Mcl-1 degradation in the presence of Bim was sufficient to induce anoikis. By analyzing nonmetastatic Saos-2 and metastatic derivative LM7 cells, we confirmed that dysregulation of Mcl-1 degradation and Bim induction during detachment contributes to decreased anoikis sensitivity of metastatic cells. Furthermore, knockdown of Mcl-1 or pharmacologic inhibition of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways that suppress Mcl-1 degradation and Bim expression could markedly sensitize metastatic breast cancer cells to anoikis and prevent metastases in vivo. Therefore, Mcl-1 degradation primes the cell for Bax activation and anoikis, which can be blocked by oncogenic signaling in metastatic cells.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18006817
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8959
      1. Author :
        Beckers, Annelies; Organe, Sophie; Timmermans, Leen; Scheys, Katryn; Peeters, Annelies; Brusselmans, Koen; Verhoeven, Guido; Swinnen, Johannes V
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Cancer research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        67
      8. Issue :
        17
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase; Apoptosis; Autophagy; Bioware; Cell Death; Cell Proliferation; Drug Evaluation, Preclinical; Fatty Acids; Humans; Macrolides; Male; Neoplasms; Palmitic Acid; PC-3M-luc; Phospholipids; Prostatic Neoplasms; Tumor Cells, Cultured
      12. Abstract :
        Development and progression of cancer is accompanied by marked changes in the expression and activity of enzymes involved in the cellular homeostasis of fatty acids. One class of enzymes that play a particularly important role in this process are the acetyl-CoA carboxylases (ACC). ACCs produce malonyl-CoA, an intermediate metabolite that functions as substrate for fatty acid synthesis and as negative regulator of fatty acid oxidation. Here, using the potent ACC inhibitor soraphen A, a macrocyclic polyketide from myxobacteria, we show that ACC activity in cancer cells is essential for proliferation and survival. Even at nanomolar concentrations, soraphen A can block fatty acid synthesis and stimulate fatty acid oxidation in LNCaP and PC-3M prostate cancer cells. As a result, the phospholipid content of cancer cells decreased, and cells stopped proliferating and ultimately died. LNCaP cells predominantly died through apoptosis, whereas PC-3M cells showed signs of autophagy. Supplementation of the culture medium with exogenous palmitic acid completely abolished the effects of soraphen A and rescued the cells from cell death. Interestingly, when added to cultures of premalignant BPH-1 cells, soraphen A only slightly affected cell proliferation and did not induce cell death. Together, these findings indicate that cancer cells have become dependent on ACC activity to provide the cell with a sufficient supply of fatty acids to permit proliferation and survival, introducing the concept of using small-molecule ACC inhibitors as therapeutic agents for cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17804731
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8974
      1. Author :
        Casarez, Eli V; Dunlap-Brown, Marya E; Conaway, Mark R; Amorino, George P
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Cancer research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        67
      8. Issue :
        17
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Carcinoma; Estradiol; Humans; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mice, Nude; Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1; Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3; PC-3M-luc; Phosphorylation; Prostatic Neoplasms; Radiation-Sensitizing Agents; Subcutaneous Tissue; Transplantation, Heterotopic; Tumor Cells, Cultured; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME2) is an endogenous estradiol metabolite that inhibits microtubule polymerization, tumor growth, and angiogenesis. Because prostate cancer is often treated with radiotherapy, and 2ME2 has shown efficacy as a single agent against human prostate carcinoma, we evaluated 2ME2 as a potential radiosensitizer in prostate cancer models. A dose-dependent decrease in mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation was observed in human PC3 prostate cancer cells treated with 2ME2 for 18 h. This decrease correlated with in vitro radiosensitization measured by clonogenic assays, and these effects were blocked by the expression of constitutively active MEK. Male nude mice with subcutaneous PC3 xenografts in the hind leg were treated with 2ME2 (75 mg/kg) p.o. for 5 days, and 2 Gy radiation fractions were delivered each day at 4 h after drug treatment. A statistically significant super-additive effect between radiation and 2ME2 was observed in this subcutaneous model, using analysis of within-animal slopes. A PC-3M orthotopic model was also used, with bioluminescence imaging as an end point. PC-3M cells stably expressing the luciferase gene were surgically implanted into the prostates of male nude mice. Mice were given oral doses of 2ME2 (75 mg/kg), with radiation fractions (3 Gy) delivered 4 h later. Mice were then imaged weekly for 4 to 5 weeks with a Xenogen system. A significant super-additive effect was also observed in the orthotopic model. These data show that 2ME2 is an effective radiosensitizing agent against human prostate cancer xenografts, and that the mechanism may involve a decrease in mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation by 2ME2.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17804747
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8972
      1. Author :
        Giubellino, Alessio; Gao, Yang; Lee, Sunmin; Lee, Min-Jung; Vasselli, James R; Medepalli, Sampath; Trepel, Jane B; Burke, Terrence R, Jr; Bottaro, Donald P
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Cancer research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        67
      8. Issue :
        13
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Movement; Cell Proliferation; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic; GRB2 Adaptor Protein; Humans; Mice; Mice, SCID; Microscopy, Fluorescence; Neoplasm Metastasis; Neoplasm Transplantation; PC-3M-luc; Protein Binding; Protein Structure, Tertiary; Tetrazolium Salts; Thiazoles
      12. Abstract :
        Metastasis, the primary cause of death in most forms of cancer, is a multistep process whereby cells from the primary tumor spread systemically and colonize distant new sites. Blocking critical steps in this process could potentially inhibit tumor metastasis and dramatically improve cancer survival rates; however, our understanding of metastasis at the molecular level is still rudimentary. Growth factor receptor binding protein 2 (Grb2) is a widely expressed adapter protein with roles in epithelial cell growth and morphogenesis, as well as angiogenesis, making it a logical target for anticancer drug development. We have previously shown that a potent antagonist of Grb2 Src homology-2 domain-binding, C90, blocks growth factor-driven cell motility in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo. We now report that C90 inhibits metastasis in vivo in two aggressive tumor models, without affecting primary tumor growth rate. These results support the potential efficacy of this compound in reducing the metastatic spread of primary solid tumors and establish a critical role for Grb2 Src homology-2 domain-mediated interactions in this process.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17616655
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8969
      1. Author :
        Lyons, Scott K; Lim, Ed; Clermont, Anne O; Dusich, Joan; Zhu, Lingyun; Campbell, Kenneth D; Coffee, Richard J; Grass, David S; Hunter, John; Purchio, Tony; Jenkins, Darlene
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2006
      5. Publication :
        Cancer research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        66
      8. Issue :
        9
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Androgens; Animals; Bioware; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic; Disease Models, Animal; Genes, Reporter; Humans; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; In Situ Hybridization; Luciferases, Firefly; Luminescent Measurements; Male; Mice; Mice, Transgenic; PC-3M-luc; Promoter Regions, Genetic; Prostate; Prostate-Specific Antigen; Prostatic Neoplasms
      12. Abstract :
        Several transgenic mouse models of prostate cancer have been developed recently that are able to recapitulate many key biological features of the human condition. It would, therefore, be desirable to employ these models to test the efficacy of new therapeutics before clinical trial; however, the variable onset and non-visible nature of prostate tumor development limit their use for such applications. We now report the generation of a transgenic reporter mouse that should obviate these limitations by enabling noninvasive in vivo bioluminescence imaging of normal and spontaneously transformed prostate tissue in the mouse. We used an 11-kb fragment of the human prostate-specific antigen (PSA) promoter to achieve specific and robust expression of firefly luciferase in the prostate glands of transgenic mice. Ex vivo bioluminescence imaging and in situ hybridization analysis confirmed that luciferase expression was restricted to the epithelium in all four lobes of the prostate. We also show that PSA-Luc mice exhibit decreased but readily detectable levels of in vivo bioluminescence over extended time periods following androgen ablation. These results suggest that this reporter should enable in vivo imaging of both androgen-dependent and androgen-independent prostate tumor models. As proof-of-principle, we show that we could noninvasively image SV40 T antigen-induced prostate tumorigenesis in mice with PSA-Luc. Furthermore, we show that our noninvasive imaging strategy can be successfully used to image tumor response to androgen ablation in transgenic mice and, as a result, that we can rapidly identify individual animals capable of sustaining tumor growth in the absence of androgen.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16651422
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8975
      1. Author :
        Noberini, R.; Koolpe, M.; Lamberto, I.; Pasquale, E. B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Pharmacol Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        66
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, B16-F10-luc-G5, B16F10-luc-G5, B16-F10-luc, B16F10-luc, Animals; COS Cells; Catechin/analogs & derivatives/chemistry/pharmacology; Cell Line; Cercopithecus aethiops; Ephrins/*metabolism; Mice; Polyphenols/*chemistry/*pharmacology; Protein Binding/drug effects; Protein Interaction Maps/*drug effects; Receptor, EphA4/antagonists & inhibitors/metabolism; Receptors, Eph Family/antagonists & inhibitors/*metabolism; Signal Transduction/drug effects; Small Molecule Libraries/chemistry/pharmacology; Tea/*chemistry
      12. Abstract :
        Tea contains a variety of bioactive chemicals, such as catechins and other polyphenols. These compounds are thought to be responsible for the health benefits of tea consumption by affecting the function of many cellular targets, not all of which have been identified. In a high-throughput screen for small molecule antagonists of the EphA4 receptor tyrosine kinase, we identified five tea polyphenols that substantially inhibit EphA4 binding to a synthetic peptide ligand. Further characterization of theaflavin monogallates from black tea and epigallocatechin-3,5-digallate from green tea revealed that these compounds at low micromolar concentrations also inhibit binding of the natural ephrin ligands to EphA4 and several other Eph receptors in in vitro assays. The compounds behave as competitive EphA4 antagonists, and their inhibitory activity is affected by amino acid mutations within the ephrin binding pocket of EphA4. In contrast, the major green tea catechin, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), does not appear to be an effective Eph receptor antagonist. In cell culture assays, theaflavin monogallates and epigallocatechin-3,5-digallate inhibit ephrin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation (activation) of Eph receptors and endothelial capillary-like tube formation. However, the wider spectrum of Eph receptors affected by the tea derivatives in cells suggests additional mechanisms of inhibition besides interfering with ephrin binding. These results show that tea polyphenols derived from both black and green tea can suppress the biological activities of Eph receptors. Thus, the Eph receptor tyrosine kinase family represents an important class of targets for tea-derived phytochemicals.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22750215
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 17
      15. Serial :
        10533
      1. Author :
        Hart, Emily; Azzopardi, Kristy; Taing, Heng; Graichen, Florian; Jeffery, Justine; Mayadunne, Roshan; Wickramaratna, Malsha; O'Shea, Mike; Nijagal, Brunda; Watkinson, Rebecca; O'Leary, Stephen; Finnin, Barrie; Tait, Russell; Robins-Browne, Roy
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        The Journal of antimicrobial chemotherapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        65
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bioware; Colony Count, Microbial; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Foreign Bodies; Humans; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Ofloxacin; Polymers; Prosthesis-Related Infections; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVES To assess support discs, comprising polyethylene terephthalate (PET), coated with different polymer/levofloxacin combinations for antimicrobial activity in an animal model of infection, in order to explore the use of specific polymer coatings incorporating levofloxacin as a means of reducing device-related infections. METHODS Aliphatic polyester-polyurethanes containing different ratios of poly(lactic acid) diol and poly(caprolactone) diol were prepared, blended with levofloxacin and then used to coat support discs. The in vitro levofloxacin release profiles from these discs were measured in aqueous solution. Mice were surgically implanted with the coated discs placed subcutaneously and infection was initiated by injection of 10(6) cfu of Staphylococcus aureus into the subcutaneous pocket containing the implant. After 5, 10, 20 and 30 days, the discs were removed, and the number of bacteria adhering to the implant and the residual antimicrobial activity of the discs were determined. RESULTS In vitro, the release of levofloxacin from the coated discs occurred at a constant rate and then reached a plateau at different timepoints, depending on the polymer preparation used. In vivo, none of the discs coated with polymer blends containing levofloxacin was colonized by S. aureus, whereas 94% of the discs coated with polymer alone were infected. All discs coated with levofloxacin-blended polymers displayed residual antimicrobial activity for at least 20 days post-implantation. CONCLUSIONS Bioerodable polyester-polyurethane polymer coatings containing levofloxacin can prevent bacterial colonization of implants in an intra-operative model of device-related infections.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20233779
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9035
      1. Author :
        Evans, L.; Williams, A. S.; Hayes, A. J.; Jones, S. A.; Nowell, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Arthritis Rheum
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        63
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MMPSense, IVIS, Acrylamides/pharmacology/*therapeutic use; Animals; Arthritis, Experimental/*drug therapy/metabolism/pathology; Cartilage/*metabolism/pathology; Fibroblasts/metabolism/pathology; Humans; Inflammation/metabolism/pathology; Leukocytes/*drug effects/metabolism/pathology; Mice; Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase/*antagonists & inhibitors; Piperidines/pharmacology/*therapeutic use
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVE: To assess the ability of pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF) to regulate inflammation and degradative processes in inflammatory arthritis, using the small molecule inhibitor APO866 in human fibroblasts in vitro and in murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). METHODS: Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to examine regulation of expression of metalloproteinases and chemokines in human fibroblasts. The role of PBEF was further examined using APO866 in mice with CIA, with effects on disease activity assessed using radiography, histology, in vivo imaging, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). RESULTS: In vitro activation of human fibroblasts with PBEF promoted expression of matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3), CCL2, and CXCL8, an effect inhibited by APO866. In mice with CIA, early intervention with APO866 inhibited synovial inflammation, including chemokine-directed leukocyte infiltration, and reduced a systemic marker of inflammation, serum hyaluronic acid. APO866 blockade led to reduced expression of MMP-3 and MMP-13 in joint extracts and to a reduction in a systemic marker of cartilage erosion, serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein. Radiologic images revealed that APO866 protected against bone erosion, while qPCR demonstrated inhibition of RANKL expression. In mice with established disease, APO866 reduced synovial inflammation and cartilage destruction, and halted bone erosion. In addition, APO866 reduced the activity of MMP-3, CCL2, and RANKL in vivo, and inhibited production of CCL2 and RANKL in synovial explants from arthritic mice, a result that was reversed with nicotinamide mononucleotide. CONCLUSION: These findings confirm PBEF to be an important regulator of inflammation, cartilage catabolism, and bone erosion, and highlight APO866 as a promising therapeutic agent for targeting PBEF activity in inflammatory arthritis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21400478
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10460
      1. Author :
        Nejadnik, M Reza; Engelsman, Anton F; Saldarriaga Fernandez, Isabel C; Busscher, Henk J; Norde, Willem; van der Mei, Henny C
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        The Journal of antimicrobial chemotherapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        62
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bioware; Colony Count, Microbial; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Polymers; Prostheses and Implants; Rifampin; Silicone Elastomers; Staphylococcus aureus; Vancomycin; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVES Curing biomaterial-associated infection (BAI) frequently includes antibiotic treatment, implant removal and re-implantation. However, revision implants are at a greater risk of infection as they may attract bacteria from their infected surroundings. Polymer brush-coatings attract low numbers of bacteria, but the virtue of polymer brush-coatings in vivo has seldom been investigated. Here, we determine the possible benefits of polymer brush-coated versus pristine silicone rubber in revision surgery, using a murine model. METHODS BAI was induced in 26 mice by subcutaneous implantation of silicone rubber discs with a biofilm of Staphylococcus aureus Xen29. During the development of BAI, half of the mice received rifampicin/vancomycin treatment. After 5 days, the infected discs were removed from all mice, and either a polymer brush-coated or pristine silicone rubber disc was re-implanted. Revision discs were explanted after 5 days, and the number of cfu cultured from the discs and the surrounding tissue was determined. RESULTS None of the polymer brush-coated discs after antibiotic treatment appeared colonized by staphylococci, whereas 83% of the pristine silicone rubber discs were re-infected. Polymer brush-coated discs also showed reduced colonization rates in the absence of antibiotic treatment when compared with pristine silicone rubber discs. Tissue surrounding the discs was culture-positive in all cases. CONCLUSIONS Polymer brush-coatings are less prone to re-infection than pristine silicone rubber when used in revision surgery, i.e. when implanted in a subcutaneous pocket infected by a staphylococcal BAI. Antibiotic pre-treatment during the development of BAI hardly had any effect in preventing the colonization of pristine silicone rubber.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18812426
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9045
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