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      1. Author :
        Cernak, I.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Front Neurol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        1
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, RediJect Inflammation Probe, chemiluminescence, XenoLight
      12. Abstract :
        Due to complex injurious environment where multiple blast effects interact with the body parallel, blast-induced neurotrauma is a unique clinical entity induced by systemic, local, and cerebral responses. Activation of autonomous nervous system; sudden pressure increase in vital organs such as lungs and liver; and activation of neuroendocrine-immune system are among the most important mechanisms that contribute significantly to molecular changes and cascading injury mechanisms in the brain. It has been hypothesized that vagally mediated cerebral effects play a vital role in the early response to blast: this assumption has been supported by experiments where bilateral vagotomy mitigated bradycardia, hypotension, and apnea, and also prevented excessive metabolic alterations in the brain of animals exposed to blast. Clinical experience suggests specific blast-body-nervous system interactions such as (1) direct interaction with the head either through direct passage of the blast wave through the skull or by causing acceleration and/or rotation of the head; and (2) via hydraulic interaction, when the blast overpressure compresses the abdomen and chest, and transfers its kinetic energy to the body's fluid phase, initiating oscillating waves that traverse the body and reach the brain. Accumulating evidence suggests that inflammation plays important role in the pathogenesis of long-term neurological deficits due to blast. These include memory decline, motor function and balance impairments, and behavioral alterations, among others. Experiments using rigid body- or head protection in animals subjected to blast showed that head protection failed to prevent inflammation in the brain or reduce neurological deficits, whereas body protection was successful in alleviating the blast-induced functional and morphological impairments in the brain.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21206523
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10420
      1. Author :
        Tremoleda, J. L.; Khalil, M.; Gompels, L. L.; Wylezinska-Arridge, M.; Vincent, T.; Gsell, W.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        EJNMMI Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        1
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense
      12. Abstract :
        Preclinical models for musculoskeletal disorders are critical for understanding the pathogenesis of bone and joint disorders in humans and the development of effective therapies. The assessment of these models primarily relies on morphological analysis which remains time consuming and costly, requiring large numbers of animals to be tested through different stages of the disease. The implementation of preclinical imaging represents a keystone in the refinement of animal models allowing longitudinal studies and enabling a powerful, non-invasive and clinically translatable way for monitoring disease progression in real time. Our aim is to highlight examples that demonstrate the advantages and limitations of different imaging modalities including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and optical imaging. All of which are in current use in preclinical skeletal research. MRI can provide high resolution of soft tissue structures, but imaging requires comparatively long acquisition times; hence, animals require long-term anaesthesia. CT is extensively used in bone and joint disorders providing excellent spatial resolution and good contrast for bone imaging. Despite its excellent structural assessment of mineralized structures, CT does not provide in vivo functional information of ongoing biological processes. Nuclear medicine is a very promising tool for investigating functional and molecular processes in vivo with new tracers becoming available as biomarkers. The combined use of imaging modalities also holds significant potential for the assessment of disease pathogenesis in animal models of musculoskeletal disorders, minimising the use of conventional invasive methods and animal redundancy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22214535
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 15
      15. Serial :
        10477
      1. Author :
        Vujanovic, L.; Ballard, W.; Thorne, S. H.; Vujanovic, N. L.; Butterfield, L. H.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Oncoimmunology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        1
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        VivoTag, IVIS, Vivotag
      12. Abstract :
        Recombinant adenovirus-engineered dendritic cells (Ad.DC) are potent vaccines for induction of anti-viral and anti-cancer T cell immunity. The effectiveness of Ad.DC vaccines may depend on the newly described ability of Ad.DC to crosstalk with natural killer (NK) cells via cell-to-cell contact, and to mediate activation, polarization and bridging of innate and adaptive immunity. For this interaction to occur in vivo, Ad.DC must be able to attract NK cells from surrounding tissues or peripheral blood. We developed a novel live mouse imaging system-based NK-cell migration test, and demonstrated for the first time that human Ad.DC induced directional migration of human NK cells across subcutaneous tissues, indicating that Ad.DC-NK cell contact and interaction could occur in vivo. We examined the mechanism of Ad.DC-induced migration of NK cells in vitro and in vivo. Ad.DC produced multiple chemokines previously reported to recruit NK cells, including immunoregulatory CXCL10/IP-10 and proinflammatory CXCL8/IL-8. In vitro chemotaxis experiments utilizing neutralizing antibodies and recombinant human chemokines showed that CXCL10/IP-10 and CXCL8/IL-8 were critical for Ad.DC-mediated recruitment of CD56(hi)CD16(-) and CD56(lo)CD16(+) NK cells, respectively. The importance of CXCL8/IL-8 was further demonstrated in vivo. Pretreatment of mice with the neutralizing anti-CXCL8/IL-8 antibody led to significant inhibition of Ad.DC-induced migration of NK cells in vivo. These data show that Ad.DC can recruit spatially distant NK cells toward a vaccine site via specific chemokines. Therefore, an Ad.DC vaccine can likely induce interaction with endogenous NK cells via transmembrane mediators, and consequently mediate Th1 polarization and amplification of immune functions in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22754763
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10570
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Molecular Imaging and Biology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        Optical imaging, Image-guided surgery, Molecular imaging, Near-infrared fluorescence
      12. Abstract :
        In cancer surgery, intra-operative assessment of the tumor-free margin, which is critical for the prognosis of the patient, relies on the visual appearance and palpation of the tumor. Optical imaging techniques provide real-time visualization of the tumor, warranting intra-operative image-guided surgery. Within this field, imaging in the near-infrared light spectrum offers two essential advantages: increased tissue penetration of light and an increased signal-tobackground-ratio of contrast agents. In this article, we review the various techniques, contrast agents, and camera systems that are currently used for image-guided surgery. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the wide range of molecular contrast agents targeting specific hallmarks of cancer and we describe perspectives on its future use in cancer surgery.
      13. URL :
        http://www.springerlink.com/content/78233815221t6563/
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4486
      1. Author :
        Filip K. Swirski, Ralph Weissleder and Mikael J. Pittet
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        N/A
      5. Publication :
        Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        atherosclerosis; in vivo imaging; monocytes; VivoTag; FMT; fluorescence molecular tomography
      12. Abstract :
        Monocytes and macrophages play active roles in atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease that is a leading cause of death in the developed world. The prevailing paradigm states that, during human atherogenesis, monocytes accumulate in the arterial intima and differentiate into macrophages, which then ingest oxidized lipoproteins, secrete a diverse array of proinflammatory mediators, and eventually become foam cells, the key constituents of a vulnerable plaque. Yet monocytes are heterogeneous. In the mouse, one subset (Ly-6Chi) promotes inflammation, expands in hypercholesterolemic conditions, and selectively gives rise to macrophages in atheromata. A different subset (Ly-6Clo) attenuates inflammation and promotes angiogenesis and granulation tissue formation in models of tissue injury, but its role in atherosclerosis is largely unknown. In the human, monocyte heterogeneity is preserved but it is still unresolved how subsets correspond functionally. The contradistinctive properties of these cells suggest commitment for specific function before infiltrating tissue. Such commitment argues for discriminate targeting of deleterious subsets while sparing host defense and repair mechanisms. In addition to advancing our understanding of atherosclerosis, the ability to target and image monocyte subsets would allow us to evaluate drugs designed to selectively inhibit monocyte subset recruitment or function, and to stratify patients at risk for developing complications such as myocardial infarction or stroke. In this review we summarize recent advances of our understanding of the behavioral heterogeneity of monocytes during disease progression and outline emerging molecular imaging approaches to address key questions in the field.
      13. URL :
        http://atvb.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/ATVBAHA.108.180521v1
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4569
      1. Author :
        Evans, L.; Williams, A.S.; Hayes, A.J.; Jones, S.A.; Nowell, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Arthritis and Rheumatism
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Apo866; Arthritis; In vivo; Living Image software; MMPSense 750 FAST; Xenogen Caliper IVIS 200
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVE: Using APO866, studies assessed the ability of Pre-B-cell colony-Enhancing Factor (PBEF) to regulate inflammatory and degradative processes in fibroblasts and collagen-induced arthritis. METHODS: ELISAs were used to examine regulation of metalloproteinases and chemokine expression by HFF fibroblasts. PBEF was further examined in the collagen-induced arthritis model using APO866. Disease activity was assessed using radiography, histology, in vivo imaging and quantitative PCR (qPCR). RESULTS: In vitro activation of fibroblasts with PBEF promoted MMP-3, CCL-2 and CXCL-8 expression, an effect inhibited by APO866. Early intervention with APO866 in collagen-induced arthritis inhibited both synovial inflammation, including chemokine-directed leukocyte infiltration, and the systemic marker of inflammation, serum hyaluronic acid. Blockade of degenerative processes by APO866 was further illustrated by the reduced expression of MMP-3 and MMP-13 in joint extracts and reduction of the systemic marker of cartilage erosion, serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). Radiology showed that APO866 protected against bone erosion, whilst qPCR demonstrated inhibition of RANKL expression. APO866 treatment in established disease (clinical score >=5) reduced synovial inflammation, cartilage destruction and halted bone erosion. MMP-3, CCL-2 and RANKL activity, as assessed by in vivo imaging with MMPSense750 and qPCR were reduced in treated animals. qPCR of synovial explants from animals with CIA showed that APO866 inhibited MMP-3, CCL-2 and RANKL production, a result that was reversed with nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) CONCLUSIONS: These data confirm PBEF to be an important regulator of inflammation, cartilage catabolism and bone erosion, and highlights APO866 as a promising therapy for targeting PBEF activity in inflammatory arthritis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21400478
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 8551
      15. Serial :
        4800
      1. Author :
        Bethunaickan, R.; Berthier, C.C.; Ramanujam, M.; Sahu, R.; Zhang, W.; Sun, Y.; Bottinger, E.P.; Ivashkiv, L.; Kretzler, M.; Davidson, A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        In vivo; kidney; mice; MMPSense 680; ProSense 680
      12. Abstract :
        Renal infiltration with mononuclear cells is associated with poor prognosis in systemic lupus erythematosus. A renal macrophage/dendritic cell signature is associated with the onset of nephritis in NZB/W mice, and immune-modulating therapies can reverse this signature and the associated renal damage despite ongoing immune complex deposition. In nephritic NZB/W mice, renal F4/80(hi)/CD11c(int) macrophages are located throughout the interstitium, whereas F4/80(lo)/CD11c(hi) dendritic cells accumulate in perivascular lymphoid aggregates. We show here that F4/80(hi)/CD11c(int) renal macrophages have a Gr1(lo)/Ly6C(lo)/VLA4(lo)/MHCII(hi)/CD43(lo)/CD62L(lo) phenotype different from that described for inflammatory macrophages. At nephritis onset, F4/80(hi)/CD11c(int) cells upregulate cell surface CD11b, acquire cathepsin and matrix metalloproteinase activity, and accumulate large numbers of autophagocytic vacuoles; these changes reverse after the induction of remission. Latex bead labeling of peripheral blood Gr1(lo) monocytes indicates that these are the source of F4/80(hi)/CD11c(int) macrophages. CD11c(hi)/MHCII(lo) dendritic cells are found in the kidneys only after proteinuria onset, turnover rapidly, and disappear rapidly after remission induction. Gene expression profiling of the F4/80(hi)/CD11c(int) population displays increased expression of proinflammatory, regulatory, and tissue repair/degradation-associated genes at nephritis onset that reverses with remission induction. Our findings suggest that mononuclear phagocytes with an aberrant activation profile contribute to tissue damage in lupus nephritis by mediating both local inflammation and excessive tissue remodeling.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21411733
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 8549
      15. Serial :
        4801
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