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      1. Author :
        Hidemi Hattori, Kaori Higuchi, Yashiro Nogami, Yoshiko Amano, Masayuki Ishihara and Bonpei Takase
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        In vivo imaging; AngioSense
      12. Abstract :
        Extract:

        With the advent of tissue regeneration and gene therapy for heart disease, evaluation of coronary circulation and cardiac function in vivo, especially in a disease model, is extremely important. Conventional methods such as microcomputed tomography, high-resolution magnetic resonance angiography, and high-resolution ultrasound have become invaluable tools in cardiovascular research. However, the disadvantages and limitations of these approaches sometimes preclude researchers from conducting important and specific studies on coronary circulation and cardiac function. Therefore, we developed and applied a novel real-time, in vivo fluorescent optical imaging system for use in the mouse cardiovascular system. We report the use of this system for repeatedly assessing coronary circulation, cardiovascular structure, and cardiac function in live mice...
      13. URL :
        http://circimaging.ahajournals.org/content/2/3/277.extract
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4648
      1. Author :
        Contag, C H; Jenkins, D; Contag, P R; Negrin, R S
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2000
      5. Publication :
        Neoplasia (New York, N.Y.)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2
      8. Issue :
        1-2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Diagnostic Imaging; Genes, Reporter; Green Fluorescent Proteins; Humans; Luciferases; Luminescent Proteins; Neoplasms; PC-3M-luc; Time Factors; Tumor Cells, Cultured
      12. Abstract :
        Revealing the cellular and molecular changes associated with cancer, as they occur in intact living animal models of human neoplastic disease, holds tremendous potential for understanding disease mechanisms and elucidating effective therapies. Since light is transmitted through mammalian tissues, at a low level, optical signatures conferred on tumor cells by expression of reporter genes encoding bioluminescent and fluorescent proteins can be detected externally using sensitive photon detection systems. Expression of reporter genes, such as the bioluminescent enzyme firefly luciferase (Luc) or variants of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in transformed cells, can effectively be used to reveal molecular and cellular features of neoplasia in vivo. Tumor cell growth and regression in response to various therapies have been evaluated non-invasively in living experimental animals using these reporter genes. Detection of Luc-labeled cells in vivo was extremely sensitive with signals over background from as few as 1000 human tumor cells distributed throughout the peritoneal cavity of a mouse with linear relationships between cell number and signal intensity over five logs. GFP offers the strength of high-resolution ex vivo analyses following in vivo localization of the tumor. The dynamic range of Luc detection allows the full disease course to be monitored since disease progression from small numbers of cells to extensive disease can be assessed. As such, therapies that target minimal disease as well as those designed for late stage disease can be readily evaluated in animal models. Real time spatiotemporal analyses of tumor cell growth can reveal the dynamics of neoplastic disease, and facilitate rapid optimization of effective treatment regimens. Thus, these methods improve the predictability of animal models of human disease as study groups can be followed over time, and can accelerate the development of therapeutic strategies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10933067
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8985
      1. Author :
        Hardy, Jonathan; Chu, Pauline; Contag, Christopher H
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Disease models & mechanisms
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2
      8. Issue :
        1-2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Bone Marrow; Bone Marrow Cells; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Host-Pathogen Interactions; Humans; Knee Joint; Listeria monocytogenes; Listeriosis; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mutation; pXen-5; Tibia
      12. Abstract :
        Murine listeriosis is one of the most comprehensive and well-studied models of infection, and Listeria monocytogenes has provided seminal information regarding bacterial pathogenesis. However, many aspects of the mouse model remain poorly understood, including carrier states and chronic colonization which represent important features of the spectrum of host-pathogen interaction. Bone marrow has recently been shown to harbor L. monocytogenes, which spreads from this location to the central nervous system. Bone could, therefore, be an important chronic reservoir, but this infection is difficult to study because it involves only a few bacteria and the extent of infection cannot be assessed until after the animal is sacrificed. We employed in vivo bioluminescence imaging to localize L. monocytogenes bone infections over time in live mice, revealing that the bacteria grow in discrete foci. These lesions can persist in many locations in the legs of mice and are not accompanied by a histological indication such as granuloma or a neutrophil infiltratate. We demonstrate that highly attenuated hly mutants, which have defective intracellular replication, are capable of prolonged focal infection of the bone marrow for periods of up to several weeks. These results support the recently proposed hypothesis that the bone marrow is a unique niche for L. monocytogenes.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19132117
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9018
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        PloS one
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Adhesins, Bacterial; Animals; Antigens, CD46; Bacteremia; Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins; Bacterial Proteins; Bacterial Translocation; Bioware; Blood-Brain Barrier; Central Nervous System; Disease Progression; Female; Luminescent Measurements; Luminescent Proteins; Male; Meningitis, Meningococcal; Meningococcal Infections; Mice; Mice, Transgenic; Nasal Cavity; pXen-13; Recombinant Fusion Proteins; Respiratory System; Sepsis; Thyroid Gland
      12. Abstract :
        Neisseria meningitidis is a human pathogen that causes septicemia and meningitis with high mortality. The disease progression is rapid and much remains unknown about the disease process. The understanding of disease development is crucial for development of novel therapeutic strategies and vaccines against meningococcal disease. The use of bioluminescent imaging combined with a mouse disease model allowed us to investigate the progression of meningococcal sepsis over time. Injection of bacteria in blood demonstrated waves of bacterial clearance and growth, which selected for Opa-expressing bacteria, indicating the importance of this bacterial protein. Further, N. meningitidis accumulated in the thyroid gland, while thyroid hormone T4 levels decreased. Bacteria reached the mucosal surfaces of the upper respiratory tract, which required expression of the meningococcal PilC1 adhesin. Surprisingly, PilC1 was dispensable for meningococcal growth in blood and for crossing of the blood-brain barrier, indicating that the major role of PilC1 is to interact with mucosal surfaces. This in vivo study reveals disease dynamics and organ targeting during meningococcal disease and presents a potent tool for further investigations of meningococcal pathogenesis and vaccines in vivo. This might lead to development of new strategies to improve the outcome of meningococcal disease in human patients.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17311106
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9032
      1. Author :
        Ohlsen, Knut; Lorenz, Udo
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Future microbiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bioware; Community-Acquired Infections; Humans; Methicillin Resistance; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Multiple resistant staphylococci that cause significant morbidity and mortality are the leading cause of nosocomial infections. Meanwhile, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) also spreads in the community, where highly virulent strains infect children and young adults who have no predisposing risk factors. Although some treatment options remain, the search for new antibacterial targets and lead compounds is urgently required to ensure that staphylococcal infections can be effectively treated in the future. Promising targets for new antibacterials are gene products that are involved in essential cell functions. In addition to antibacterials, active and passive immunization strategies are being developed that target surface components of staphylococci such as cell wall-linked adhesins, teichoic acids and capsule or immunodominant antigens.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18041906
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9049
      1. Author :
        Apidianakis, Y.; Mindrinos, M. N.; Xiao, W.; Tegos, G. P.; Papisov, M. I.; Hamblin, M. R.; Davis, R. W.; Tompkins, R. G.; Rahme, L. G.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen, Xen5
      12. Abstract :
        Despite recent advances in our understanding the pathophysiology of trauma, the basis of the predisposition of trauma patients to infection remains unclear. A Drosophila melanogaster/Pseudomonas aeruginosa injury and infection model was used to identify host genetic components that contribute to the hyper-susceptibility to infection that follows severe trauma. We show that P. aeruginosa compromises skeletal muscle gene (SMG) expression at the injury site to promote infection. We demonstrate that activation of SMG structural components is under the control of cJun-N-terminal Kinase (JNK) Kinase, Hemipterous (Hep), and activation of this pathway promotes local resistance to P. aeruginosa in flies and mice. Our study links SMG expression and function to increased susceptibility to infection, and suggests that P. aeruginosa affects SMG homeostasis locally by restricting SMG expression in injured skeletal muscle tissue. Local potentiation of these host responses, and/or inhibition of their suppression by virulent P. aeruginosa cells, could lead to novel therapies that prevent or treat deleterious and potentially fatal infections in severely injured individuals.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18159239
      14. Call Number :
        135889
      15. Serial :
        6705
      1. Author :
        Reppert, S.; Boross, I.; Koslowski, M.; Tureci, O.; Koch, S.; Lehr, H. A.; Finotto, S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Nat Commun
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        LL/2-luc-M38, LL/2-luc, Lewis Lung Carcinoma, IVIS, Adenocarcinoma/drug therapy/genetics/*immunology/metabolism/pathology; Administration, Intranasal; Adult; Aged; Animals; Antibodies, Neutralizing/administration & dosage/*therapeutic use; Antigens, CD/immunology; Female; Forkhead Transcription Factors/genetics/*immunology/metabolism; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/drug effects/*immunology; Humans; Immunologic Surveillance; Interferon-gamma/biosynthesis/immunology; Interleukin-17/immunology/metabolism; Interleukin-23/immunology/metabolism; Lung/drug effects/*immunology/metabolism/pathology; Lung Neoplasms/drug therapy/genetics/*immunology/metabolism/pathology; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; Middle Aged; T-Box Domain Proteins/deficiency/*genetics/immunology; T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/immunology
      12. Abstract :
        Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. The cytokine interleukin-17A supports tumour vascularization and growth, however, its role in lung cancer is unknown. Here we show, in the lungs of patients with lung adenocarcinoma, an increase in interleukin-17A that is inversely correlated with the expression of T-bet and correlated with the T regulatory cell transcription factor Foxp3. Local targeting of interleukin-17A in experimental lung adenocarcinoma results in a reduction in tumour load, local expansion of interferon-gamma-producing CD4(+) T cells and a reduction in lung CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells. T-bet((-/-)) mice have a significantly higher tumour load compared with wild-type mice. This is associated with the local upregulation of interleukin-23 and induction of interleukin-17A/interleukin-17R-expressing T cells infiltrating the tumour. Local anti-interleukin-17A antibody treatment partially improves the survival of T-bet((-/-)) mice. These results suggest that local anti-interleukin-17A antibody therapy could be considered for the treatment of lung tumours.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22186896
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10544