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      1. Author :
        Weljie, A. M.; Bondareva, A.; Zang, P.; Jirik, F. R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Biomol NMR
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        49
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-luc2, IVIS, Breast Cancer, Bioware
      12. Abstract :
        Hypoxia can promote invasive behavior in cancer cells and alters the response to therapeutic intervention as a result of changes in the expression many genes, including genes involved in intermediary metabolism. Although metabolomics technologies are capable of simultaneously measuring a wide range of metabolites in an untargeted manner, these methods have been relatively under utilized in the study of cancer cell responses to hypoxia. Thus, (1)H NMR metabolomics was used to examine the effects of hypoxia in the MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell line, both in vitro and in vivo. Cell cultures were compared with respect to their metabolic responses during growth under either hypoxic (1% O(2)) or normoxic conditions. Orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) was used to identify a set of metabolites that were responsive to hypoxia. Via intracardiac administration, MDA-MB-231 cells were also used to generate widespread metastatic disease in immuno-compromised mice. Serum metabolite analysis was conducted to compare animals with and without a large tumor burden. Intriguingly, using a cross-plot of the OPLS loadings, both the in vitro and in vivo samples yielded a subset of metabolites that were significantly altered by hypoxia. These included primarily energy metabolites and amino acids, indicative of known alterations in energy metabolism, and possibly protein synthesis or catabolism. The results suggest that the metabolite pattern identified might prove useful as a marker for intra-tumoral hypoxia.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21373841
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10494
      1. Author :
        Wallis de Vries BM, van Dam GM, Tio RA, Hillebrands JL, Slart RH and Zeebregts CJ
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Vascular Surgery
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        48
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        In vivo imaging; MMPSense; atherosclerotic carotid plaque
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: There is increasing evidence that plaque vulnerability, rather than the degree of stenosis, is important in predicting the occurrence of subsequent cerebral ischemic events in patients with carotid artery stenosis. The many imaging modalities currently available have different properties with regard to the visualization of the extent of vulnerability in carotid plaque formation.

        METHODS: Original published studies were identified using the MEDLINE database (January 1966 to March 2008). Manual cross-referencing was also performed.

        RESULTS: There is no single imaging modality that can produce definitive information about the state of vulnerability of an atherosclerotic plaque. Each has its own specific drawbacks, which may be the use of ionizing radiation or nephrotoxic contrast agents, an invasive character, low patient tolerability, or simply the paucity of information obtained on plaque vulnerability. Functional molecular imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) and near infra-red spectroscopy (NIRS) do seem able accurately to visualize and even quantify features of plaque vulnerability and its pathophysiologic processes. Promising new techniques like near infra-red fluorescence imaging are being developed and may be beneficial in this field.

        CONCLUSION: There is a promising role for functional molecular imaging modalities like PET, SPECT, or NIRS related to improvement of selection criteria for carotid intervention, especially when combined with CT or MRI to add further anatomical details to molecular information. Further information will be needed to define whether and where this functional molecular imaging will fit into a clinical strategy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.jvascsurg.org/article/S0741-5214(08)01146-4/abstract
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4643
      1. Author :
        Kadurugamuwa, Jagath L; Sin, Lin V; Yu, Jun; Francis, Kevin P; Purchio, Tony F; Contag, Pamela R
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2004
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        48
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antibiotics, Antitubercular; Biofilms; Bioware; Colony Count, Microbial; Diagnostic Imaging; DNA-Directed RNA Polymerases; Luminescent Measurements; Mice; Rifampin; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Eradication of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms after rifampin treatment was tested in a mouse model of device-related infection by using biophotonic imaging. Following treatment, the bioluminescent signals decreased to undetectable levels, irrespective of the age of the biofilm. After the final treatment, the signals rebounded in a time-dependent manner and reached those for the untreated mice. Readministration of rifampin was unsuccessful in eradicating reestablished infections, with the rifampin MICs for such bacteria being increased and with the bacteria having point mutations in the rpoB gene.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15155235
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9056
      1. Author :
        Snoeks, T. J.; Khmelinskii, A.; Lelieveldt, B. P.; Kaijzel, E. L.; Lowik, C. W.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Bone
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        48
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Bone Neoplasms/radionuclide imaging/*secondary; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Forecasting; Optics and Photonics/*trends; Positron-Emission Tomography/methods; Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon/methods; X-Ray Microtomography/methods; X-Rays
      12. Abstract :
        Optical Imaging has evolved into one of the standard molecular imaging modalities used in pre-clinical cancer research. Bone research however, strongly depends on other imaging modalities such as SPECT, PET, x-ray and muCT. Each imaging modality has its own specific strengths and weaknesses concerning spatial resolution, sensitivity and the possibility to quantify the signal. An increasing number of bone specific optical imaging models and probes have been developed over the past years. This review gives an overview of optical imaging modalities, models and probes that can be used to study skeletal complications of cancer in small laboratory animals.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20688203
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 19
      15. Serial :
        10378
      1. Author :
        Georgel, P.; Radosavljevic, M.; Macquin, C.; Bahram, S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Mol Immunol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        48
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen14, Xen 14, E. coli Xen14, IVIS, Animals; Cell Line, Tumor; Female; Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/genetics/*immunology; Humans; Klebsiella Infections/*immunology/prevention & control; Klebsiella pneumoniae/*immunology; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout
      12. Abstract :
        As opposed to the well established role of MHC-linked, polymorphic, class I (MHC-I) genes in adaptive immunity, a universal role for non-conventional MHC-I is unknown, thus requiring a case-by-case study. The MHC unlinked, monomorphic, but beta(2)microglobulin (beta(2)m)-associated “MHC class I related” MR1 molecule interacts with a semi-invariant TCR. The pathophysiology of this interaction or more importantly of this peculiar MHC-I remains mostly unknown. Recently it was shown that beta(2)m deficient mice were more susceptible to infection by Klebsiella pneumoniae, a widely spread Gram-negative bacteria that causes diverse and often severe ailments in man. Here we demonstrate, using both an in vivo imaging system and survival tests, the increased susceptibility to K. pneumoniae (but not to several other Gram negative bacteria) of MR1 deficient mice. This is accompanied by a consequent change in body temperature and systemic cytokine profile. Hence MR1 controls K. pneumoniae infection in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21190736
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 9
      15. Serial :
        10392
      1. Author :
        Ketonis, C.; Barr, S.; Shapiro, I. M.; Parvizi, J.; Adams, C. S.; Hickok, N. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Bone
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        48
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen36, Xen 36, Staphylococcus aureus Xen36, IVIS, Adsorption/drug effects; Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry/*pharmacology; Biological Markers/metabolism; *Bone Transplantation; Cell Differentiation/drug effects; Cell Shape/drug effects; Cells, Cultured; Colony Count, Microbial; Drug Stability; Fetus/cytology; Fluorescence; Gene Expression Profiling; Humans; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Osteoblasts/cytology/drug effects/metabolism; Phenotype; Time Factors; Transplantation, Homologous; Vancomycin/chemistry/*pharmacology
      12. Abstract :
        Bacterial contamination of bone allograft is a significant complication of orthopedic surgery. To address this issue, we have engineered a method for covalently modifying bone allograft tissue with the antibiotic vancomycin. The goal of this investigation was to compare the biocidal properties of this new allograft material with those of vancomycin physisorbed onto graft material. The duration of antibiotic release from the vancomycin-modified allograft matrix was determined, and no elution was observed. In contrast, the adsorbed antibiotic showed a peak elution at 24h that then decreased over several days. We next used an Staphylococcus aureus disk diffusion assay to measure the activity of the eluted vancomycin. Again we found that no active antibiotic was eluted from the covalently modified allograft. Similarly, when the vancomycin-modified allograft morsel was used in the assay, no measurable elution was observed; amounts of antibiotic released from the adsorbed samples inhibited S. aureus growth for 4-7 days. Probably the most telling property of the allograft was that after 2 weeks, the tethered allograft was able to resist bacterial colonization. Unlike the elution system in which vancomycin was depleted over the course of days-weeks, the antibiotic on the allograft was stably bound even after 300 days, while its biocidal activity remained undiminished for 60 days. This finding was in stark contrast to the antibiotic impregnated allograft, which was readily colonized by bacteria. Finally we chose to evaluate three indicators of cell function: expression of a key transcription factor, expression of selected transcripts, and assessment of cell morphology. Since the tethered antibiotic appeared to have little or no effect on any of these activities, it was concluded that the stable, tethered antibiotic prevented bacterial infection while not modifying bone cell function.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21035576
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 7
      15. Serial :
        10407
      1. Author :
        Wallis de Vries, B. M.; van Dam, G. M.; Tio, R. A.; Hillebrands, J. L.; Slart, R. H.; Zeebregts, C. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        J Vasc Surg
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        48
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MMPSense, IVIS, Atherosclerosis/complications/*diagnosis; Carotid Stenosis/*diagnosis/etiology; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Humans; Reproducibility of Results
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: There is increasing evidence that plaque vulnerability, rather than the degree of stenosis, is important in predicting the occurrence of subsequent cerebral ischemic events in patients with carotid artery stenosis. The many imaging modalities currently available have different properties with regard to the visualization of the extent of vulnerability in carotid plaque formation. METHODS: Original published studies were identified using the MEDLINE database (January 1966 to March 2008). Manual cross-referencing was also performed. RESULTS: There is no single imaging modality that can produce definitive information about the state of vulnerability of an atherosclerotic plaque. Each has its own specific drawbacks, which may be the use of ionizing radiation or nephrotoxic contrast agents, an invasive character, low patient tolerability, or simply the paucity of information obtained on plaque vulnerability. Functional molecular imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) and near infra-red spectroscopy (NIRS) do seem able accurately to visualize and even quantify features of plaque vulnerability and its pathophysiologic processes. Promising new techniques like near infra-red fluorescence imaging are being developed and may be beneficial in this field. CONCLUSION: There is a promising role for functional molecular imaging modalities like PET, SPECT, or NIRS related to improvement of selection criteria for carotid intervention, especially when combined with CT or MRI to add further anatomical details to molecular information. Further information will be needed to define whether and where this functional molecular imaging will fit into a clinical strategy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18804942
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10464
      1. Author :
        Snoeks, T. J.; Khmelinskii, A.; Lelieveldt, B. P.; Kaijzel, E. L.; Lowik, C. W.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Bone
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        48
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, Animals; Bone Neoplasms/radionuclide imaging/*secondary; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Forecasting; Optics and Photonics/*trends; Positron-Emission Tomography/methods; Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon/methods; X-Ray Microtomography/methods; X-Rays
      12. Abstract :
        Optical Imaging has evolved into one of the standard molecular imaging modalities used in pre-clinical cancer research. Bone research however, strongly depends on other imaging modalities such as SPECT, PET, x-ray and muCT. Each imaging modality has its own specific strengths and weaknesses concerning spatial resolution, sensitivity and the possibility to quantify the signal. An increasing number of bone specific optical imaging models and probes have been developed over the past years. This review gives an overview of optical imaging modalities, models and probes that can be used to study skeletal complications of cancer in small laboratory animals.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20688203
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10476
      1. Author :
        Kadurugamuwa, J. L.; Sin, L. V.; Yu, J.; Francis, K. P.; Kimura, R.; Purchio, T.; Contag, P. R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2003
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        47
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals, Anti-Bacterial Agents/ pharmacology, Bacterial Infections/drug therapy/microbiology, Biofilms/ drug effects/growth & development, Bioware; Catheterization/adverse effects, Chemiluminescent Measurements, Ciprofloxacin/pharmacology, Colony Count, Microbial, Disease Models, Animal, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Drug Monitoring/methods, Mice, Rifampin/pharmacology, Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects/genetics/growth & development, Tobramycin/pharmacology IVIS, Xenogen; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        We have developed a rapid, continuous method for monitoring the effectiveness of several antibacterial agents in real time, noninvasively, by using a recently described mouse model of chronic biofilm infection (J. L. Kadurugamuwa et al., Infect. Immun. 71:882-890, 2003), which relies on biophotonic imaging of bioluminescent bacteria. To facilitate real-time monitoring of infection, we used a Staphylococcus aureus isolate that was made bioluminescent by inserting a modified lux operon into the bacterial chromosome. This bioluminescent reporter bacterium was used to study the antimicrobial effects of several antibiotics belonging to different molecular families. Treatment with rifampin, tobramycin, and ciprofloxacin was started 7 days after subcutaneous implantation of catheters precolonized with 10(4) CFU of S. aureus. Three different doses of antibiotics were administered twice a day for 4 consecutive days. The number of metabolically active bacteria in untreated mice and the tobramycin- and ciprofloxacin-treated groups remained relatively unchanged over the 4-week observation period, indicating poor efficacies for tobramycin and ciprofloxacin. A rapid dose-dependent decline in metabolic activity in rifampin-treated groups was observed, with almost a 90% reduction after two doses and nearly undetectable levels after three doses. The disappearance of light emission correlated with colony counts. After the final treatment, cell numbers rebounded as a function of concentration in a time-dependent manner. The staphylococci isolated from the catheters of mice treated with rifampin were uniformly resistant to rifampin but retained their in vitro susceptibilities to tobramycin and ciprofloxacin. Since the metabolic activities of viable cells and a postantibiotic effect could be detected directly on the support matrix nondestructively and noninvasively, the methodology is specifically appealing for investigating the effects of antibiotics on biofilms in vivo. Moreover, our study points to the possible use of biophotonic imaging for the detection of the development of resistance to therapeutic agents during treatment of chronic infections in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14506020
      14. Call Number :
        139345
      15. Serial :
        7448