1. Resources
  2. Citations Library

Citation Details

You are viewing citation details. You can save or export citation(s) below, access an article, or start a new search.

161–170 of 499 records found matching your query:
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All

Headers act as filters

      1. Author :
        Casarez, Eli V; Dunlap-Brown, Marya E; Conaway, Mark R; Amorino, George P
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Cancer research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        67
      8. Issue :
        17
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Carcinoma; Estradiol; Humans; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mice, Nude; Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1; Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3; PC-3M-luc; Phosphorylation; Prostatic Neoplasms; Radiation-Sensitizing Agents; Subcutaneous Tissue; Transplantation, Heterotopic; Tumor Cells, Cultured; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME2) is an endogenous estradiol metabolite that inhibits microtubule polymerization, tumor growth, and angiogenesis. Because prostate cancer is often treated with radiotherapy, and 2ME2 has shown efficacy as a single agent against human prostate carcinoma, we evaluated 2ME2 as a potential radiosensitizer in prostate cancer models. A dose-dependent decrease in mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation was observed in human PC3 prostate cancer cells treated with 2ME2 for 18 h. This decrease correlated with in vitro radiosensitization measured by clonogenic assays, and these effects were blocked by the expression of constitutively active MEK. Male nude mice with subcutaneous PC3 xenografts in the hind leg were treated with 2ME2 (75 mg/kg) p.o. for 5 days, and 2 Gy radiation fractions were delivered each day at 4 h after drug treatment. A statistically significant super-additive effect between radiation and 2ME2 was observed in this subcutaneous model, using analysis of within-animal slopes. A PC-3M orthotopic model was also used, with bioluminescence imaging as an end point. PC-3M cells stably expressing the luciferase gene were surgically implanted into the prostates of male nude mice. Mice were given oral doses of 2ME2 (75 mg/kg), with radiation fractions (3 Gy) delivered 4 h later. Mice were then imaged weekly for 4 to 5 weeks with a Xenogen system. A significant super-additive effect was also observed in the orthotopic model. These data show that 2ME2 is an effective radiosensitizing agent against human prostate cancer xenografts, and that the mechanism may involve a decrease in mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation by 2ME2.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17804747
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8972
      1. Author :
        Palmer, Kelli L; Aye, Lindsay M; Whiteley, Marvin
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Journal of bacteriology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        189
      8. Issue :
        22
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Adult; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bacterial Proteins; Bacteriological Techniques; Bioware; Culture Media; Cystic Fibrosis; Gene Expression Profiling; Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial; Humans; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Sputum; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen36
      12. Abstract :
        The sputum (mucus) layer of the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung is a complex substrate that provides Pseudomonas aeruginosa with carbon and energy to support high-density growth during chronic colonization. Unfortunately, the CF lung sputum layer has been difficult to mimic in animal models of CF disease, and mechanistic studies of P. aeruginosa physiology during growth in CF sputum are hampered by its complexity. In this study, we performed chromatographic and enzymatic analyses of CF sputum to develop a defined, synthetic CF sputum medium (SCFM) that mimics the nutritional composition of CF sputum. Importantly, P. aeruginosa displays similar phenotypes during growth in CF sputum and in SCFM, including similar growth rates, gene expression profiles, carbon substrate preferences, and cell-cell signaling profiles. Using SCFM, we provide evidence that aromatic amino acids serve as nutritional cues that influence cell-cell signaling and antimicrobial activity of P. aeruginosa during growth in CF sputum.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17873029
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9985
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        179
      8. Issue :
        9
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Amine Oxidase (Copper-Containing); Animals; Bacterial Adhesion; Bioware; Cell Adhesion Molecules; Coxsackievirus Infections; Immunity, Mucosal; Immunoglobulin A; Lymphocyte Count; Lymphocytes; Lymphoid Tissue; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; Peyer's Patches; Receptors, Lymphocyte Homing; Staphylococcal Vaccines; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen36
      12. Abstract :
        VAP-1, an ecto-enzyme expressed on the surface of endothelial cells, is involved in leukocyte trafficking between the blood and tissues under physiological and pathological conditions. In this study, we used VAP-1-deficient mice to elucidate whether absence of VAP-1 alters the immune system under normal conditions and upon immunization and microbial challenge. We found that VAP-1-deficient mice display age-dependent paucity of lymphocytes, in the Peyer's patches of the gut. IgA concentration in serum was also found to be lower in VAP-1(-/-) animals than in wild-type mice. Although there were slightly less CD11a on B and T cells isolated from VAP-1-deficient mice than on those from wild-type mice, there were no differences in the expression of gut-homing-associated adhesion molecules or chemokine receptors. Because anti-VAP-1 therapies are being developed for clinical use to treat inflammation, we determined the effect of VAP-1 deletion on useful immune responses. Oral immunization with OVA showed defective T and B cell responses in VAP-1-deficient mice. Antimicrobial immune responses against Staphylococcus aureus and coxsackie B4 virus were also affected by the absence of VAP-1. Importantly, when the function of VAP-1 was acutely neutralized using small molecule enzyme inhibitors and anti-VAP-1 Abs rather than by gene deletion, no significant impairment in antimicrobial control was detected. In conclusion, VAP-1-deficient mice have mild deviations in the mucosal immune system and therapeutic targeting of VAP-1 does not appear to cause a generalized increase in the risk of infection.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17947691
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9984
      1. Author :
        Woelfle, Mark A; Xu, Yao; Qin, Ximing; Johnson, Carl Hirschie
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        104
      8. Issue :
        47
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Bioware; Circadian Rhythm; Cyanobacteria; DNA, Bacterial; DNA, Superhelical; Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial; Light; Plasmids; Promoter Regions, Genetic; pXen-13; Transcription, Genetic
      12. Abstract :
        The cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus expresses robust circadian (daily) rhythms under the control of the KaiABC-based core clockwork. Unlike eukaryotic circadian systems characterized thus far, the cyanobacterial clockwork modulates gene expression patterns globally and specific clock gene promoters are not necessary in mediating the circadian feedback loop. The oscilloid model postulates that global rhythms of transcription are based on rhythmic changes in the status of the cyanobacterial chromosome that are ultimately controlled by the KaiABC oscillator. By using a nonessential, cryptic plasmid (pANS) as a reporter of the superhelical state of DNA in cyanobacteria, we show that the supercoiling status of this plasmid changes in a circadian manner in vivo. The rhythm of topological change in the plasmid is conditional; this change is rhythmic in constant light and in light/dark cycles, but not in constant darkness. In further support of the oscilloid model, cyanobacterial promoters that are removed from their native chromosomal locations and placed on a plasmid preserve their circadian expression patterns.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18000054
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9031
      1. Author :
        Woods, Nicholas T; Yamaguchi, Hirohito; Lee, Francis Y; Bhalla, Kapil N; Wang, Hong-Gang
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Cancer research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        67
      8. Issue :
        22
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anoikis; Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins; bcl-2-Associated X Protein; Bioware; Caspase 3; Cell Line, Tumor; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic; Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3; Humans; L-Lactate Dehydrogenase; MDA-MB-231-D3H2LN cells; Membrane Proteins; Mice; Neoplasm Metastasis; Neoplasm Proteins; NIH 3T3 Cells; Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases; Proto-Oncogene Proteins; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2
      12. Abstract :
        Anoikis, a Bax-dependent apoptosis triggered by detachment from the extracellular matrix, is often dysfunctional in metastatic cancer cells. Using wild-type and c-Src-transformed NIH3T3 cells as a model, we identified Mcl-1 degradation and Bim up-regulation as a critical determinant of anoikis initiation. Detachment rapidly degraded Mcl-1 via a GSK-3beta-dependent proteasomal pathway and transcriptionally up-regulated Bim expression. Mcl-1 degradation in the presence of Bim was sufficient to induce anoikis. By analyzing nonmetastatic Saos-2 and metastatic derivative LM7 cells, we confirmed that dysregulation of Mcl-1 degradation and Bim induction during detachment contributes to decreased anoikis sensitivity of metastatic cells. Furthermore, knockdown of Mcl-1 or pharmacologic inhibition of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways that suppress Mcl-1 degradation and Bim expression could markedly sensitize metastatic breast cancer cells to anoikis and prevent metastases in vivo. Therefore, Mcl-1 degradation primes the cell for Bax activation and anoikis, which can be blocked by oncogenic signaling in metastatic cells.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18006817
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8959
      1. Author :
        Ohlsen, Knut; Lorenz, Udo
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Future microbiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bioware; Community-Acquired Infections; Humans; Methicillin Resistance; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Multiple resistant staphylococci that cause significant morbidity and mortality are the leading cause of nosocomial infections. Meanwhile, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) also spreads in the community, where highly virulent strains infect children and young adults who have no predisposing risk factors. Although some treatment options remain, the search for new antibacterial targets and lead compounds is urgently required to ensure that staphylococcal infections can be effectively treated in the future. Promising targets for new antibacterials are gene products that are involved in essential cell functions. In addition to antibacterials, active and passive immunization strategies are being developed that target surface components of staphylococci such as cell wall-linked adhesins, teichoic acids and capsule or immunodominant antigens.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18041906
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9049
      1. Author :
        Luker, G.D.; Luker, K.E.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Nuclear Medicine: Official Publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        49
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Clinical Medicine; Contrast Media; Diagnostic Imaging; Fluorescence; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; in vivo; in vivo imaging; Luminescent Measurements; Mice; Neoplasm Metastasis; Neoplasms; Optics and Photonics; Peptide Hydrolases; Rats; Signal Transduction; Software; Tomography, Optical
      12. Abstract :
        Optical techniques, such as bioluminescence and fluorescence, are emerging as powerful new modalities for molecular imaging in disease and therapy. Combining innovative molecular biology and chemistry, researchers have developed optical methods for imaging a variety of cellular and molecular processes in vivo, including protein interactions, protein degradation, and protease activity. Whereas optical imaging has been used primarily for research in small-animal models, there are several areas in which optical molecular imaging will translate to clinical medicine. In this review, we summarize recent advances in optical techniques for molecular imaging and the potential impact for clinical medicine.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18077528
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 7444
      15. Serial :
        4477
      1. Author :
        Singh, Abhinav; Massoud, Tarik F; Deroose, Christophe; Gambhir, Sanjiv S
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Seminars in nuclear medicine
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        38
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Bioware; Diagnostic Imaging; Genes, Reporter; Humans; Male; Molecular Probe Techniques; Neoplasm Proteins; PC-3M-luc; Prostatic Neoplasms; Tumor Markers, Biological
      12. Abstract :
        Prostate cancer remains an important and growing health problem. Advances in imaging of prostate cancer may help to achieve earlier and more accurate diagnosis and treatment. We review the various strategies using reporter genes for molecular imaging of prostate cancer. These approaches are emerging as valuable tools for monitoring gene expression in laboratory animals and humans. Further development of more sensitive and selective reporters, combined with improvements in detection technology, will consolidate the position of reporter gene imaging as a versatile method for understanding of intracellular biological processes and the underlying molecular basis of prostate cancer, as well as potentially establishing a future role in the clinical management of patients afflicted with this disease.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18096460
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8966
      1. Author :
        Apidianakis, Y.; Mindrinos, M. N.; Xiao, W.; Tegos, G. P.; Papisov, M. I.; Hamblin, M. R.; Davis, R. W.; Tompkins, R. G.; Rahme, L. G.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen, Xen5
      12. Abstract :
        Despite recent advances in our understanding the pathophysiology of trauma, the basis of the predisposition of trauma patients to infection remains unclear. A Drosophila melanogaster/Pseudomonas aeruginosa injury and infection model was used to identify host genetic components that contribute to the hyper-susceptibility to infection that follows severe trauma. We show that P. aeruginosa compromises skeletal muscle gene (SMG) expression at the injury site to promote infection. We demonstrate that activation of SMG structural components is under the control of cJun-N-terminal Kinase (JNK) Kinase, Hemipterous (Hep), and activation of this pathway promotes local resistance to P. aeruginosa in flies and mice. Our study links SMG expression and function to increased susceptibility to infection, and suggests that P. aeruginosa affects SMG homeostasis locally by restricting SMG expression in injured skeletal muscle tissue. Local potentiation of these host responses, and/or inhibition of their suppression by virulent P. aeruginosa cells, could lead to novel therapies that prevent or treat deleterious and potentially fatal infections in severely injured individuals.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18159239
      14. Call Number :
        135889
      15. Serial :
        6705
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Brazilian dental journal
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        18
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Colony Count, Microbial; Cuspid; Dental Pulp Cavity; Disinfectants; Drug Combinations; Genetic Engineering; Humans; Hydrogen peroxide; Incisor; Luminescent Measurements; Luminescent Proteins; Maxilla; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Root Canal Irrigants; Root Canal Preparation; Sensitivity and Specificity; Sodium Hypochlorite; Xen5
      12. Abstract :
        Microbial infection plays an important role in the development of pulp necrosis and formation of periapical lesions. In vitro and in vivo research in this field, traditionally microbiological culture methods using paper point sampling and quantitative culture, faces difficulties in completely removing bacteria from the root canal system and analyzing sequential procedures. This study employed genetically engineered bioluminescent bacteria and a light-sensitive imaging system to allow real-time visualization of the infection. Ten extracted teeth incubated with P. aeruginosa were treated by mechanical instrumentation with K-files (#30 K-file, #35 K-file and #40 K-file) and chemical irrigation with sodium hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide. Irrigation alone reduced the contamination in 18%; the first chemomechanical sequence (instrumentation with a #30 K-file + irrigation) provided 41% of reduction; the second sequence (#35 K-file + irrigation) achieved 62%; and the complete therapy (#30 K-file + #35 K-file + #40 K-file + irrigation) achieved 93% of bacterial reduction. These results suggest that the endodontic treatment is dependent on the association of a chemical and mechanical approaches and that root canal enlargement improves bacterial reduction probably because the irrigation has more access to the apical third.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18176710
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9998
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All