1. Resources
  2. Citations Library

Citation Details

You are viewing citation details. You can save or export citation(s) below, access an article, or start a new search.

201–210 of 499 records found matching your query:
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All

Headers act as filters

  •  
  • Records
      1. Author :
        Engelsman, Anton F; Krom, Bastiaan P; Busscher, Henk J; van Dam, Gooitzen M; Ploeg, Rutger J; van der Mei, Henny C
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Acta biomaterialia
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bioware; Connective Tissue; Diffusion; Drug Implants; Female; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Nitric Oxide; Polyvinyls; Prostheses and Implants; pXen-5; Staphylococcal Infections; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Infection of surgical meshes used in abdominal wall reconstructions often leads to removal of the implant and increases patient morbidity due to repetitive operations and hospital administrations. Treatment with antibiotics is ineffective due to the biofilm mode of growth of the infecting bacteria and bears the risk of inducing antibiotic resistance. Hence there is a need for alternative methods to prevent and treat mesh infection. Nitric oxide (NO)-releasing coatings have been demonstrated to possess bactericidal properties in vitro. It is the aim of this study to assess possible benefits of a low concentration NO-releasing carbon-based coating on monofilament polypropylene meshes with respect to infection control in vitro and in vivo. When applied on surgical meshes, NO-releasing coatings showed significant bactericidal effect on in vitro biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and CNS. However, using bioluminescent in vivo imaging, no beneficial effects of this NO-releasing coating on subcutaneously implanted surgical meshes in mice could be observed.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19251498
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9019
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        PloS one
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        4
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Antineoplastic Agents; Bioware; Breast Neoplasms; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Movement; Cell Proliferation; Cell Survival; Diphosphonates; Esterification; Female; Humans; Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions; MDA-MB-231-D3H2LN cells; Neoplasm Metastasis; Structure-Activity Relationship
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND Although there was growing evidence in the potential use of Bisphosphonates (BPs) in cancer therapy, their strong osseous affinities that contrast their poor soft tissue uptake limited their use. Here, we developed a new strategy to overcome BPs hydrophilicity by masking the phosphonic acid through organic protecting groups and introducing hydrophobic functions in the side chain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS We synthesized non-nitrogen BPs (non N-BPs) containing bromobenzyl group (BP7033Br) in their side chain that were symmetrically esterified with hydrophobic 4-methoxphenyl (BP7033BrALK) and assessed their effects on breast cancer estrogen-responsive cells (T47D, MCF-7) as well as on non responsive ones (SKBR3, MDA-MB-231 and its highly metastatic derived D3H2LN subclone). BP7033Br ALK was more efficient in inhibiting tumor cell proliferation, migration and survival when compared to BP7033Br. Although both compounds inhibited tumor growth without side effects, only BP7033Br ALK abrogated tumor angiogenesis and D3H2LN cells-induced metastases formation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE Taken together these data suggest the potential therapeutic use of this new class of esterified Bisphosphonates (BPs) in the treatment of tumor progression and metastasis without toxic adverse effects.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19262688
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8958
      1. Author :
        Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Kataoka, Ken; Abarzua, Fernando; Tanimoto, Ryuta; Watanabe, Masami; Murata, Hitoshi; Than, Swe Swe; Kurose, Kaoru; Kashiwakura, Yuji; Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Huh, Nam-ho
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        The Journal of biological chemistry
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        284
      8. Issue :
        21
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Adenoviridae; Animals; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Proliferation; Endoplasmic Reticulum; Fibroblasts; Humans; Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins; Interferon Regulatory Factor-1; Interleukin-7; MAP Kinase Kinase Kinase 5; Mice; Neoplasms; p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases; PC-3M-luc; Signal Transduction; STAT1 Transcription Factor
      12. Abstract :
        We previously showed that the tumor suppressor gene REIC/Dkk-3, when overexpressed by an adenovirus (Ad-REIC), exhibited a dramatic therapeutic effect on human cancers through a mechanism triggered by endoplasmic reticulum stress. Adenovirus vectors show no target cell specificity and thus may elicit unfavorable side effects through infection of normal cells even upon intra-tumoral injection. In this study, we examined possible effects of Ad-REIC on normal cells. We found that infection of normal human fibroblasts (NHF) did not cause apoptosis but induced production of interleukin (IL)-7. The induction was triggered by endoplasmic reticulum stress and mediated through IRE1alpha, ASK1, p38, and IRF-1. When Ad-REIC-infected NHF were transplanted in a mixture with untreated human prostate cancer cells, the growth of the cancer cells was significantly suppressed. Injection of an IL-7 antibody partially abrogated the suppressive effect of Ad-REIC-infected NHF. These results indicate that Ad-REIC has another arm against human cancer, an indirect host-mediated effect because of overproduction of IL-7 by mis-targeted NHF, in addition to its direct effect on cancer cells.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19279003
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8948
      1. Author :
        Ghali, Shadi; Bhatt, Kirit A; Dempsey, Marlese P; Jones, Deidre M; Singh, Sunil; Aarabi, Shahram; Arabi, Shahram; Butler, Peter E; Gallo, Robert L; Gurtner, Geoffrey C
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Plastic and reconstructive surgery
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        123
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides; Bioware; Cathelicidins; Chronic Disease; Drug Carriers; Genetic Engineering; Male; Rats; Rats, Inbred F344; Surgical Flaps; Wound Infection; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND The success of antimicrobial therapy has been impaired by the emergence of resistant bacterial strains. Antimicrobial peptides are ubiquitous proteins that are part of the innate immune system and are successful against such antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. The authors have previously demonstrated the feasibility of protein delivery via microvascular free flap gene therapy and here they examine this approach for recalcitrant infections. METHODS The authors investigated the production of the human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide-LL37, delivered by ex vivo transduction of the rodent superficial inferior epigastric free flap with Ad/CMV-LL37. The vascular permeabilizing agent vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was co-administered during ex vivo transduction with adenoviral vectors in an attempt to augment transduction efficiency. A rodent model of chronic wound/foreign body infection seeded with bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus was used to assess the biological efficacy of delivering therapeutic antimicrobial genes using this technology. RESULTS The authors were successful in demonstrating significant LL37 expression, which persisted for 14 days after ex vivo transduction with Ad/CMV-LL37. Transduction efficiency was significantly improved with the co-administration of 5 micrograms of VEGF during transduction without significantly increasing systemic dissemination of adenovirus or systemic toxicity. They were able to demonstrate in the rodent model of chronic wound/foreign body infections a significant reduction in bacterial loads from infected catheters following transduction with Ad/CMV-LL37 and increased bacterial clearance. CONCLUSION This study demonstrates for the first time that microbicidal gene therapy via microvascular free flaps is able to clear chronic infections such as occurs with osteomyelitis resulting from trauma or an infected foreign body [corrected]
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19337084
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9040
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Infection and immunity
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        77
      8. Issue :
        7
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animal Structures; Animals; Antibodies, Bacterial; Antigens, Bacterial; Bacterial Proteins; Bioware; Cell Wall; Colony Count, Microbial; Female; Humans; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Neutrophils; Opsonin Proteins; Proteome; Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcal Vaccines; Staphylococcus aureus; Vaccines, Subunit; Vaccines, Synthetic; Whole Body Imaging; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen with increasing clinical impact due to the extensive spread of antibiotic-resistant strains. Therefore, development of a protective polyvalent vaccine is of great clinical interest. We employed an intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) preparation as a source of antibodies directed against anchorless S. aureus surface proteins for identification of novel vaccine candidates. In order to identify such proteins, subtractive proteome analysis (SUPRA) of S. aureus anchorless cell wall proteins was performed. Proteins reacting with IVIG but not with IVIG depleted of S. aureus-specific opsonizing antibodies were considered vaccine candidates. Nearly 40 proteins were identified by this preselection method using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization--time of flight analysis. Three of these candidate proteins, enolase (Eno), oxoacyl reductase (Oxo), and hypothetical protein hp2160, were expressed as glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins, purified, and used for enrichment of corresponding immunoglobulin Gs from IVIG by affinity chromatography. Use of affinity-purified anti-Eno, anti-Oxo, and anti-hp2160 antibodies resulted in opsonization, phagocytosis, and killing of S. aureus by human neutrophils. High specific antibody titers were detected in mice immunized with recombinant antigens. In mice challenged with bioluminescent S. aureus, reduced staphylococcal spread was measured by in vivo imaging. The recovery of S. aureus CFU from organs of immunized mice was diminished 10- to 100-fold. Finally, mice immunized with hp2160 displayed statistically significant higher survival rates after lethal challenge with clinically relevant S. aureus strains. Taken together, our data suggest that anchorless cell wall proteins might be promising vaccine candidates and that SUPRA is a valuable tool for their identification.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19364833
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9039
      1. Author :
        Lim, Ed; Modi, Kshitij D; Kim, Jaebeom
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Journal of visualized experiments: JoVE
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        26
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        4T1-luc2; Animals; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Female; Luciferases; Luminescent Measurements; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental; Mice; Mice, Nude
      12. Abstract :
        4T1 mouse mammary tumor cells can be implanted sub-cutaneously in nu/nu mice to form palpable tumors in 15 to 20 days. This xenograft tumor model system is valuable for the pre-clinical in vivo evaluation of putative antitumor compounds. The 4T1 cell line has been engineered to constitutively express the firefly luciferase gene (luc2). When mice carrying 4T1-luc2 tumors are injected with Luciferin the tumors emit a visual light signal that can be monitored using a sensitive optical imaging system like the IVIS Spectrum. The photon flux from the tumor is proportional to the number of light emitting cells and the signal can be measured to monitor tumor growth and development. IVIS is calibrated to enable absolute quantitation of the bioluminescent signal and longitudinal studies can be performed over many months and over several orders of signal magnitude without compromising the quantitative result. Tumor growth can be monitored for several days by bioluminescence before the tumor size becomes palpable or measurable by traditional physical means. This rapid monitoring can provide insight into early events in tumor development or lead to shorter experimental procedures. Tumor cell death and necrosis due to hypoxia or drug treatment is indicated early by a reduction in the bioluminescent signal. This cell death might not be accompanied by a reduction in tumor size as measured by physical means. The ability to see early events in tumor necrosis has significant impact on the selection and development of therapeutic agents. Quantitative imaging of tumor growth using IVIS provides precise quantitation and accelerates the experimental process to generate results.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19404236
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8941
      1. Author :
        Hickson, Jonathan
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Urologic oncology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        27
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Biological Markers; Bioware; Diagnostic Imaging; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; Luminescent Measurements; Luminescent Proteins; Molecular Probes; Optical Devices; Optical Phenomena; PC-3M-luc; Reproducibility of Results
      12. Abstract :
        There has recently been an explosion in the availability of new technologies to noninvasively detect biological processes in preclinical models. One such modality, optical imaging, comprises using bioluminescent and fluorescent reporters and probes to repetitively interrogate molecular events and monitor disease progression in animal models. This review includes an overview of optical imaging technologies (e.g., hardware, reporters, probes) available for small animal imaging and their application in monitoring disease progression, therapeutic efficacy, and molecular processes such as proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. Also discussed are some of the challenges associated with in vivo optical imaging and the necessary controls and biological correlates one must include in experimental design and interpretation for successful preclinical studies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19414115
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8964
      1. Author :
        Klohs J, Baeva N, Steinbrink J, Bourayou R, Boettcher C, Royl G, Megow D, Dirnagl U, Priller J and Wunder A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        29
      8. Issue :
        7
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Neuroscience
      11. Keywords :
        MMPSense; in vivo imaging; matrix metalloproteinases; stroke
      12. Abstract :
        Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been implicated in the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia. In this study, we explored whether MMP activity can be visualized by noninvasive near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging using an MMP-activatable probe in a mouse model of stroke. C57Bl6 mice were subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) or sham operation. Noninvasive NIRF imaging was performed 24 h after probe injection, and target-to-background ratios (TBRs) between the two hemispheres were determined. TBRs were significantly higher in MCAO mice injected with the MMP-activatable probe than in sham-operated mice and in MCAO mice that were injected with the nonactivatable probe as controls. Treatment with an MMP inhibitor resulted in significantly lower TBRs and lesion volumes compared to injection of vehicle. To test the contribution of MMP-9 to the fluorescence signal, MMP9-deficient (MMP9(-/-)) mice and wild-type controls were subjected to MCAO of different durations to attain comparable lesion volumes. TBRs were significantly lower in MMP9(-/-) mice, suggesting a substantial contribution of MMP-9 activity to the signal. Our study shows that MMP activity after cerebral ischemia can be imaged noninvasively with NIRF using an MMP-activatable probe, which might be a useful tool to study MMP activity in the pathophysiology of the disease.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19417756
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4547
      1. Author :
        Jason R. McCarthy, Purvish Patel, Ion Botnaru, Pouneh Haghayeghi, Ralph Weissleder and Farouc A. Jaffer
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Bioconjugate Chemistry
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        20
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        In vivo imaging; thrombi; VivoTag
      12. Abstract :
        Thrombosis underlies numerous life-threatening cardiovascular syndromes. Development of thrombosis-specific molecular imaging agents to detect and monitor thrombogenesis and fibrinolysis in vivo could improve the diagnosis, risk stratification, and treatment of thrombosis syndromes. To this end, we have synthesized efficient multimodal nanoagents targeted to two different constituents of thrombi, namely, fibrin and activated factor XIII. These agents are targeted via the conjugation of peptide-targeting ligands to the surface of fluorescently labeled magnetic nanoparticles. As demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo studies, both nanoagents possess high affinities for thrombi, and enable mutimodal fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19456115
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4647
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All