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      1. Author :
        Heit, Bryan; Robbins, Stephen M; Downey, Charlene M; Guan, Zhiwen; Colarusso, Pina; Miller, B Joan; Jirik, Frank R; Kubes, Paul
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Nature immunology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        9
      8. Issue :
        7
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Arthritis, Experimental; Bioware; Chemotaxis, Leukocyte; Humans; Inflammation; Mice; Mice, Transgenic; Neutrophils; p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases; Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases; Phosphatidylinositol Phosphates; Protein Transport; PTEN Phosphohydrolase; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Neutrophils encounter and 'prioritize' many chemoattractants in their pursuit of bacteria. Here we tested the possibility that the phosphatase PTEN is responsible for the prioritization of chemoattractants. Neutrophils induced chemotaxis by two separate pathways, the phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI(3)K) phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) pathway, and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, with the p38 pathway dominating over the PI(3)K pathway. Pten(-/-) neutrophils could not prioritize chemoattractants and were 'distracted' by chemokines when moving toward bacterial chemoattractants. In opposing gradients, PTEN became distributed throughout the cell circumference, which inhibited all PI(3)K activity, thus permitting 'preferential' migration toward bacterial products via phospholipase A(2) and p38. Such prioritization was defective in Pten(-/-) neutrophils, which resulted in defective bacterial clearance in vivo. Our data identify a PTEN-dependent mechanism in neutrophils to prioritize, 'triage' and integrate responses to multiple chemotactic cues.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18536720
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9048
      1. Author :
        Engelsman, Anton F; van der Mei, Henny C; Francis, Kevin P; Busscher, Henk J; Ploeg, Rutger J; van Dam, Gooitzen M
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Journal of biomedical materials research. Part B, Applied biomaterials
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        88
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Infective Agents; Bacterial Adhesion; Biofilms; Bioware; Chromosomes, Bacterial; Colony Count, Microbial; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Prostheses and Implants; pXen-5; Soft Tissue Infections; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Infection is the main cause of biomaterials-related failure. A simple technique to test in-vivo new antimicrobial and/or nonadhesive implant coatings is unavailable. Current in vitro methods for studying bacterial adhesion and growth on biomaterial surfaces lack the influence of the host immune system. Most in vivo methods to study biomaterials-related infections routinely involve implant-removal, preventing comprehensive longitudinal monitoring. In vivo imaging circumvents these drawbacks and is based on the use of noninvasive optical imaging of bioluminescent bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus Xen29 is genetically modified to be stably bioluminescent, by the introduction of a modified full lux operon onto its chromosome. Surgical meshes with adhering S. aureus Xen29 were implanted in mice and bacterial growth and spread into the surrounding tissue was monitored longitudinally from bioluminescence with a highly sensitive CCD camera. Distinct spatiotemporal bioluminescence patterns, extending beyond the mesh area into surrounding tissues were observed. After 10 days, the number of living organisms isolated from explanted meshes was found to correlate with bioluminescence prior to sacrifice of the animals. Therefore, it is concluded that in vivo imaging using bioluminescent bacteria is ideally suited to study antimicrobial coatings taking into account the host immune system. In addition, longitudinal monitoring of infection in one animal will significantly reduce the number of experiments and animals.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18618733
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9020
      1. Author :
        Smith, Eric L; Schuchman, Edward H
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Molecular therapy: the journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        16
      8. Issue :
        9
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Autophagy; B16-F10-luc-G5 cells; Bioware; Cell Survival; Cells, Cultured; Ceramides; Cesium Radioisotopes; CHO Cells; Combined Modality Therapy; Cricetinae; Cricetulus; Endothelium, Vascular; Female; Gamma Rays; Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic; Gene Therapy; Humans; Melanoma, Experimental; Mice; Sphingomyelin Phosphodiesterase
      12. Abstract :
        Exposure of cells or animals to stress frequently induces acid sphingomyelinase (ASM)-mediated ceramide production that leads to cell death. Consistent with this, overexpression of ASM in subcutaneous B16-F10 mouse melanomas, in combination with irradiation, resulted in tumors that were up to 12-fold smaller than irradiated control melanomas. Similarly, when irradiated melanomas were pretreated with a single, peritumoral injection of recombinant ASM (rhASM), the tumors were up to threefold smaller. The in vivo effect of ASM was likely due to enhanced cell death of the tumor cells themselves, as well as the surrounding microvascular endothelial cells. In vitro, rhASM had little or no effect on the growth of tumor cells, even in combination with irradiation. However, when the culture media was acidified to mimic the acidic microenvironment of solid tumors, rhASM-mediated cell death was markedly enhanced when combined with irradiation. Microscopic analysis suggested that this was associated with an increase in autophagy. rhASM has been produced for the treatment of the lysosomal storage disorder, type B Niemann-Pick disease, and is currently being evaluated in a phase-1 clinical trial. Based on the data presented in this article, we propose that further investigation of this protein and gene as antineoplastic agents also is warranted.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18628757
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8999
      1. Author :
        Shan, Liang; Wang, Songping; Korotcov, Alexandru; Sridhar, Rajagopalan; Wang, Paul C
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Ethnicity & disease
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        18
      8. Issue :
        2 Suppl 2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Breast Neoplasms; Disease Models, Animal; Humans; Luciferases; Luminescent Measurements; Lung Neoplasms; Mammary Neoplasms, Animal; MDA-MB-231-D3H1 cells; Mice; Mice, Nude; Tumor Cells, Cultured
      12. Abstract :
        INTRODUCTION Convenient animal models are needed to study the progression and treatment of human tumors in vivo. Luciferase-based bioluminescent imaging (BLI) enables researchers to monitor tumors noninvasively and is sensitive to subtle changes in tumors. METHODS Three human breast cancer models in nude mice were established by using luciferase-expressing MDA-MB-231-luc cells. They were subcutaneous xenografts (n = 8), mammary gland xenografts (n = 5), and lung metastases (n = 3). The tumors were imaged in live mice by using a highly sensitive BLI system. The relationship between the intensity of bioluminescence from the tumor was analyzed with respect to tumor volume. Bioluminescent signals from lung metastases were studied to determine the threshold of detectability. RESULTS Tumors growing in the mice's backs and mammary gland fat pads were imaged dynamically after administration of D-luciferin. The bioluminescent intensity from the tumors gradually increased and then decreased in a one-hour span. The time to reach maximum signal intensity differed significantly among tumors and was independent of tumor volume and unrelated to maximum signal intensity. A significant correlation was observed between tumor volume and maximum signal intensity in tumors from both sites. Lung metastatic lesions of .3-.5 mm in diameter were clearly detectable through the entire animal imaging process. CONCLUSION The animal models established with luciferase-expressing cancer cells in combination with BLI provide a system for rapid, noninvasive, and quantitative analysis of tumor biomass and metastasis. This biosystem simplifies in vivo monitoring of tumors and will be useful for noninvasive investigation of tumor growth and response to therapy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18646323
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8991
      1. Author :
        Pozo, J. L. del; Rouse, M. S.; Mandrekar, J. N.; Sampedro, M. F.; Steckelberg, J. M.; Patel, R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        53
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen, Xen30, Xen5, Xen41
      12. Abstract :
        Bacterial biofilms are resistant to conventional antimicrobial agents. Prior in vitro studies have shown that electrical current (EC) enhances the activities of aminoglycosides, quinolones, and oxytetracycline against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus gordonii. This phenomenon, known as the bioelectric effect, has been only partially defined. The purpose of this work was to study the in vitro bioelectric effect on the activities of 11 antimicrobial agents representing a variety of different classes against P. aeruginosa, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and S. epidermidis. An eight-channel current generator/controller and eight chambers delivering a continuous flow of fresh medium with or without antimicrobial agents and/or EC to biofilm-coated coupons were used. No significant decreases in the numbers of log10 CFU/cm2 were seen after exposure to antimicrobial agents alone, with the exception of a 4.57-log-unit reduction for S. epidermidis and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. We detected a statistically significant bioelectric effect when vancomycin plus 2,000 microamperes EC were used against MRSA biofilms (P = 0.04) and when daptomycin and erythromycin were used in combination with 200 or 2,000 microamperes EC against S. epidermidis biofilms (P = 0.02 and 0.0004, respectively). The results of these experiments indicate that the enhancement of the activity of antimicrobial agents against biofilm organisms by EC is not a generalizable phenomenon across microorganisms and antimicrobial agents.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18725436
      14. Call Number :
        137347
      15. Serial :
        5991
      1. Author :
        Xing, Yifei; Lu, Xiaochun; Pua, Eric C; Zhong, Pei
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Biochemical and biophysical research communications
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        375
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; B16-F10-luc-G5 cells; Bioware; Cytotoxicity Tests, Immunologic; Female; Melanoma, Experimental; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Neoplasm Metastasis; Ultrasonic Therapy
      12. Abstract :
        This study aims to assess the risk of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy on the incidence of distant metastases and to investigate its association with HIFU-elicited anti-tumor immunity in a murine melanoma (B16-F10) model. Tumor-bearing legs were amputated immediately after or 2 days following HIFU treatment to differentiate the contribution of the elicited anti-tumor immunity. In mice undergoing amputation immediately after mechanical, thermal, or no HIFU treatment, metastasis rates were comparable (18.8%, 13.3%, and 12.5%). In contrast, with a 2-day delay in amputation, the corresponding metastasis rates were 6.7%, 11.8%, and 40%, respectively. Animal survival rate was higher and CTL activity was enhanced in the HIFU treatment groups. Altogether, our results suggest that HIFU treatment does not increase the risk of distant metastasis. Instead, HIFU treatment can elicit an anti-tumor immune response that may be harnessed to improve the overall effectiveness and quality of cancer therapy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18727919
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8998
      1. Author :
        G. Blum
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Current Opinion in Drug Discovery Development
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        10
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Biology; Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        Proteases; pathology; biological markers; fluorescence imaging reagents; in vivo imaging; fluorescence molecular tomography; FMT
      12. Abstract :
        Proteases play pivotal roles in the normal function of cells. In addition, the expression and activity of proteases are significantly upregulated in several pathologies, including cancer, arthritis and atherosclerosis, and hence they can be considered to be biological markers for these pathologies. The hydrolyzing activity of proteases has been used to generate a variety of fluorescent imaging reagents, the design and utility of which are reviewed here. The use of imaging reagents to visualize protease activity allows for improved detection of various pathologies as well as the ability to monitor the efficacy of therapies in vivo and provide molecular information regarding the nature of the pathology.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18729022
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4475
      1. Author :
        Stan, Silvia D; Hahm, Eun-Ryeong; Warin, Renaud; Singh, Shivendra V
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Cancer research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        68
      8. Issue :
        18
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; Apoptosis; Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins; Bioware; Breast Neoplasms; Cell Growth Processes; Cell Line, Tumor; Ergosterol; Female; Forkhead Transcription Factors; Humans; MDA-MB-231-D3H1 cells; Membrane Proteins; Mice; Mice, Nude; Proto-Oncogene Proteins; RNA, Small Interfering; Transfection; Withanolides; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Withaferin A (WA) is derived from the medicinal plant Withania somnifera, which has been safely used for centuries in Indian Ayurvedic medicine for treatment of different ailments. We now show, for the first time, that WA exhibits significant activity against human breast cancer cells in culture and in vivo. The WA treatment decreased viability of MCF-7 (estrogen-responsive) and MDA-MB-231 (estrogen-independent) human breast cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The WA-mediated suppression of breast cancer cell viability correlated with apoptosis induction characterized by DNA condensation, cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation, and cleavage of poly-(ADP-ribose)-polymerase. On the other hand, a spontaneously immortalized normal mammary epithelial cell line (MCF-10A) was relatively more resistant to WA-induced apoptosis compared with breast cancer cells. The WA-mediated apoptosis was accompanied by induction of Bim-s and Bim-L in MCF-7 cells and induction of Bim-s and Bim-EL isoforms in MDA-MB-231 cells. The cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation resulting from WA exposure was significantly attenuated by knockdown of protein levels of Bim and its transcriptional regulator FOXO3a in both cell lines. Moreover, FOXO3a knockdown conferred marked protection against WA-mediated induction of Bim-s expression. The growth of MDA-MB-231 cells implanted in female nude mice was significantly retarded by 5 weekly i.p. injections of 4 mg WA/kg body weight. The tumors from WA-treated mice exhibited reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptosis compared with tumors from control mice. These results point toward an important role of FOXO3a and Bim in regulation of WA-mediated apoptosis in human breast cancer cells.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18794155
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8990
      1. Author :
        Wallis de Vries, B. M.; van Dam, G. M.; Tio, R. A.; Hillebrands, J. L.; Slart, R. H.; Zeebregts, C. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        J Vasc Surg
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        48
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MMPSense, IVIS, Atherosclerosis/complications/*diagnosis; Carotid Stenosis/*diagnosis/etiology; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Humans; Reproducibility of Results
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: There is increasing evidence that plaque vulnerability, rather than the degree of stenosis, is important in predicting the occurrence of subsequent cerebral ischemic events in patients with carotid artery stenosis. The many imaging modalities currently available have different properties with regard to the visualization of the extent of vulnerability in carotid plaque formation. METHODS: Original published studies were identified using the MEDLINE database (January 1966 to March 2008). Manual cross-referencing was also performed. RESULTS: There is no single imaging modality that can produce definitive information about the state of vulnerability of an atherosclerotic plaque. Each has its own specific drawbacks, which may be the use of ionizing radiation or nephrotoxic contrast agents, an invasive character, low patient tolerability, or simply the paucity of information obtained on plaque vulnerability. Functional molecular imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) and near infra-red spectroscopy (NIRS) do seem able accurately to visualize and even quantify features of plaque vulnerability and its pathophysiologic processes. Promising new techniques like near infra-red fluorescence imaging are being developed and may be beneficial in this field. CONCLUSION: There is a promising role for functional molecular imaging modalities like PET, SPECT, or NIRS related to improvement of selection criteria for carotid intervention, especially when combined with CT or MRI to add further anatomical details to molecular information. Further information will be needed to define whether and where this functional molecular imaging will fit into a clinical strategy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18804942
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10464