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      1. Author :
        Jan Grimm; David G. Kirsch; Stephen D. Windsor; Carla F. Bender Kim; Philip M. Santiago; Vasilis Ntziachristos; Tyler Jacks; Ralph Weissleder
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        PNAS
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        102
      8. Issue :
        40
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        gene expression profiling; lung cancer; immunohistochemistry; Western blotting; in vivo imaging; moleuclar imaging; fluorescence molecular tomography
      12. Abstract :
        Using gene expression profiling, we identified cathepsin cysteine proteases as highly up-regulated genes in a mouse model of human lung adenocarcinoma. Overexpression of cathepsin proteases in these lung tumors was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Therefore, an optical probe activated by cathepsin proteases was selected to detect murine lung tumors in vivo as small as 1 mm in diameter and spatially separated. We generated 3D maps of the fluorescence signal and fused them with anatomical computed tomography images to show a close correlation between fluorescence signal and tumor burden. By serially imaging the same mouse, optical imaging was used to follow tumor progression. This study demonstrates the capability for molecular imaging of a primary lung tumor by using endogenous proteases expressed by a tumor. It also highlights the feasibility of using gene expression profiling to identify molecular targets for imaging lung cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1242291/
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4524
      1. Author :
        Kim, J. B.; Urban, K.; Cochran, E.; Lee, S.; Ang, A.; Rice, B.; Bata, A.; Campbell, K.; Coffee, R.; Gorodinsky, A.; Lu, Z.; Zhou, H.; Kishimoto, T. K.; Lassota, P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen, VIS, 4T1-luc2, Animals; Cell Line, Tumor; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Female; Genetic Vectors/genetics; Lentivirus/genetics; Luciferases/genetics/*metabolism; Luminescent Measurements/instrumentation/*methods; Lung Neoplasms/diagnosis/metabolism/secondary; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental/diagnosis/genetics/*metabolism; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Transplantation; Neoplasms/genetics/metabolism/pathology; Sensitivity and Specificity; Time Factors; Transfection; Tumor Burden
      12. Abstract :
        Early detection of tumors can significantly improve the outcome of tumor treatment. One of the most frequently asked questions in cancer imaging is how many cells can be detected non-invasively in a live animal. Although many factors limit such detection, increasing the light emission from cells is one of the most effective ways of overcoming these limitations. Here, we describe development and utilization of a lentiviral vector containing enhanced firefly luciferase (luc2) gene. The resulting single cell clones of the mouse mammary gland tumor (4T1-luc2) showed stable light emission in the range of 10,000 photons/sec/cell. In some cases individual 4T1-luc2 cells inserted under the skin of a nu/nu mouse could be detected non-invasively using a cooled CCD camera in some cases. In addition, we showed that only few cells are needed to develop tumors in these mice and tumor progression can be monitored right after the cells are implanted. Significantly higher luciferase activity in these cells allowed us to detect micrometastases in both, syngeneic Balb/c and nu/nu mice.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=20186331
      14. Call Number :
        139615
      15. Serial :
        7111
      1. Author :
        Nguyen, V. H.; Kim, H. S.; Ha, J. M.; Hong, Y.; Choy, H. E.; Min, J. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        70
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals, Blotting, Western, Xen26, Cell Line, Tumor, Diagnostic Imaging/methods, Gene Therapy/*methods, Genetic Engineering/*methods, Genetic Vectors/*therapeutic use, Humans, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Neoplasms/*therapy, Perforin/*genetics/therapeutic use, Promoter Regions, Genetic, Salmonella typhimurium/*genetics, bcl-Associated Death Protein/genetics IVIS, Xenogen
      12. Abstract :
        Tumor-targeting bacteria have been studied in terms of their ability to visualize the infection pathway (through imaging probes) or to carry therapeutic molecules to tumors. To integrate these monitoring and therapeutic functions, we engineered attenuated Salmonella typhimurium defective in guanosine 5'-diphosphate-3'-diphosphate synthesis to carry cytotoxic proteins (cytolysin A) and express reporter genes. We successfully visualized the therapeutic process with these engineered bacteria in mice and found that they often mediated complete tumor (CT-26) eradication on cytotoxic gene induction. Furthermore, treatment with the engineered bacteria markedly suppressed metastatic tumor growth.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=20028866
      14. Call Number :
        141643
      15. Serial :
        6246
      1. Author :
        Sottnik, J. L.; U, L. W.'Ren; Thamm, D. H.; Withrow, S. J.; Dow, S. W.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Immunol Immunother
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        59
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals, Chronic Disease, Disease Models, Animal, Immunity, Innate, Killer Cells, Natural/immunology, Macrophages/immunology, Mice, Mice, Inbred C3H, Mice, Inbred Strains, Monocytes/immunology, Neoplasms, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Osteomyelitis/*complications, Osteosarcoma/*complications/*immunology/pathology, Staphylococcal Infections/*complications IVIS, Xenogen, Xen36
      12. Abstract :
        Clinical studies over the past several years have reported that metastasis-free survival times in humans and dogs with osteosarcoma are significantly increased in patients that develop chronic bacterial osteomyelitis at their surgical site. However, the immunological mechanism by which osteomyelitis may suppress tumor growth has not been investigated. Therefore, we used a mouse model of osteomyelitis to assess the effects of bone infection on innate immunity and tumor growth. A chronic Staphylococcal osteomyelitis model was established in C3H mice and the effects of infection on tumor growth of syngeneic DLM8 osteosarcoma were assessed. The effects of infection on tumor angiogenesis and innate immunity, including NK cell and monocyte responses, were assessed. We found that osteomyelitis significantly inhibited the growth of tumors in mice, and that the effect was independent of the infecting bacterial type, tumor type, or mouse strain. Depletion of NK cells or monocytes reversed the antitumor activity elicited by infection. Moreover, infected mice had a significant increase in circulating monocytes and numbers of tumor associated macrophages. Infection suppressed tumor angiogenesis but did not affect the numbers of circulating endothelial cells. Therefore, we concluded that chronic localized bacterial infection could elicit significant systemic antitumor activity dependent on NK cells and macrophages.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=19701748
      14. Call Number :
        143227
      15. Serial :
        5718
      1. Author :
        Bondareva, A.; Downey, C. M.; Ayres, F.; Liu, W.; Boyd, S. K.; Hallgrimsson, B.; Jirik, F. R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        4
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen
      12. Abstract :
        Lysyl oxidase (LOX), an extracellular matrix remodeling enzyme, appears to have a role in promoting breast cancer cell motility and invasiveness. In addition, increased LOX expression has been correlated with decreases in both metastases-free, and overall survival in breast cancer patients. With this background, we studied the ability of beta-aminopropionitrile (BAPN), an irreversible inhibitor of LOX, to regulate the metastatic colonization potential of the human breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231. BAPN was administered daily to mice starting either 1 day prior, on the same day as, or 7 days after intracardiac injection of luciferase expressing MDA-MB-231-Luc2 cells. Development of metastases was monitored by in vivo bioluminescence imaging, and tumor-induced osteolysis was assessed by micro-computed tomography (microCT). We found that BAPN administration was able to reduce the frequency of metastases. Thus, when BAPN treatment was initiated the day before, or on the same day as the intra-cardiac injection of tumor cells, the number of metastases was decreased by 44%, and 27%, and whole-body photon emission rates (reflective of total tumor burden) were diminished by 78%, and 45%, respectively. In contrast, BAPN had no effect on the growth of established metastases. Our findings suggest that LOX activity is required during extravasation and/or initial tissue colonization by circulating MDA-MB-231 cells, lending support to the idea that LOX inhibition might be useful in metastasis prevention.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=19440335
      14. Call Number :
        136327
      15. Serial :
        7869
      1. Author :
        Sadikot, R. T.; Blackwell, T. S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Methods Mol Biol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        477
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Adenoviridae/genetics, Anesthesia, Animals, Firefly Luciferin/administration & dosage/pharmacology, *Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects, Genetic Vectors/genetics, Luciferases/metabolism, Luminescent Measurements/*methods, Mice, Photons, Whole Body Imaging/*methods IVIS, Xenogen, Xen5
      12. Abstract :
        Molecular imaging offers many unique opportunities to study biological processes in intact organisms. Bioluminescence is the emission of light from biochemical reactions that occur within a living organism. Luciferase has been used as a reporter gene in transgenic mice but, until bioluminescence imaging was described, the detection of luciferase activity required either sectioning of the animal or excision of tissue and homogenization to measure enzyme activities in a conventional luminometer. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is based on the idea that biological light sources can be incorporated into cells and animal models artificially that does not naturally express the luminescent genes. This imaging modality has proven to be a very powerful methodology to detect luciferase reporter activity in intact animal models. This form of optical imaging is low cost and noninvasive and facilitates real-time analysis of disease processes at the molecular level in living organisms. Bioluminescence provides a noninvasive method to monitor gene expression in vivo and has enormous potential to elucidate the pathobiology of lung diseases in intact mouse models, including models of inflammation/injury, infection, and cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=19082962
      14. Call Number :
        142705
      15. Serial :
        5558
      1. Author :
        Pozo, J. L. del; Rouse, M. S.; Mandrekar, J. N.; Steckelberg, J. M.; Patel, R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrob Agents Chemother
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        53
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aza Compounds/pharmacology, Biofilms/drug effects/*growth & development, Electricity/*adverse effects, Pseudomonas/drug effects/*growth & development, Quinolines/pharmacology, Staphylococcus/drug effects/*growth & development, Tobramycin/pharmacology IVIS, Xenogen, Xen30
      12. Abstract :
        The activity of electrical current against planktonic bacteria has previously been demonstrated. The short-term exposure of the bacteria in biofilms to electrical current in the absence of antimicrobials has been shown to have no substantial effect; however, longer-term exposure has not been studied. A previously described in vitro model was used to determine the effect of prolonged exposure (i.e., up to 7 days) to low-intensity (i.e., 20-, 200-, and 2,000-microampere) electrical direct currents on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms. Dose- and time-dependent killing was observed. A maximum of a 6-log(10)-CFU/cm(2) reduction was observed when S. epidermidis biofilms were exposed to 2,000 microamperes for at least 2 days. A 4- to 5-log(10)-CFU/cm(2) reduction was observed when S. aureus biofilms were exposed to 2,000 microamperes for at least 2 days. Finally, a 3.5- to 5-log(10)-CFU/cm(2) reduction was observed when P. aeruginosa biofilms were exposed to electrical current for 7 days. A higher electrical current intensity correlated with greater decreases in viable bacteria at all time points studied. In conclusion, low-intensity electrical current substantially reduced the numbers of viable bacteria in staphylococcal or Pseudomonas biofilms, a phenomenon we have labeled the “electricidal effect.”
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=18955534
      14. Call Number :
        137350
      15. Serial :
        7845
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