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      1. Author :
        Park, Hae-Sun; Francis, Kevin P; Yu, Jun; Cleary, P Patrick
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2003
      5. Publication :
        Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        171
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Administration, Intranasal; Animals; Bioware; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Humans; Immunohistochemistry; Intracellular Fluid; Lymphoid Tissue; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Nasal Mucosa; Nasopharynx; Palatine Tonsil; pXen-5; Streptococcal Infections; Streptococcus pyogenes
      12. Abstract :
        Human tonsils are suspected to be an antibiotic-impervious human reservoir for group A streptococcus. An intranasal infection model in mice and a bioluminescent-tagged strain were used to investigate this possibility. Viable streptococci were predominantly found both intra- and extracellularly in nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT), a human tonsil homologue. Ulex europaeus-1, a membranous (M) cell-specific lectin, identified cells harboring streptococci at the epithelial surface of NALT and blocked bacterial colonization of this tissue. These results suggest that M cells in NALT transport this Gram-positive pathogen across the epithelial layers in a manner similar to those in Peyer's patches, which permit enteric pathogens to invade deeper tissues from the gastrointestinal tract.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12928403
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9025
      1. Author :
        Malley, R.; Henneke, P.; Morse, S. C.; Cieslewicz, M. J.; Lipsitch, M.; Thompson, C. M.; Kurt-Jones, E.; Paton, J. C.; Wessels, M. R.; Golenbock, D. T.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2003
      5. Publication :
        Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        100
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen, Xen10
      12. Abstract :
        Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the leading causes of invasive bacterial disease worldwide. Fragments of the cell wall and the cytolytic toxin pneumolysin have been shown to contribute substantially to inflammatory damage, although the interactions between pneumococcal components and host-cell structures have not been elucidated completely. Results of a previous study indicated that cell-wall components of pneumococci are recognized by Toll-like receptor (TLR)2 but suggested that pneumolysin induces inflammatory events independently of this receptor. In this study we tested the hypothesis that pneumolysin interacts with surface proteins of the TLR family other than TLR2. We found that pneumolysin stimulates tumor necrosis factor-? and IL-6 release in wild-type macrophages but not in macrophages from mice with a targeted deletion of the cytoplasmic TLR-adapter molecule myeloid differentiation factor 88, suggesting the involvement of the TLRs in pneumolysin recognition. Purified pneumolysin synergistically activated macrophage responses together with preparations of pneumococcal cell walls or staphylococcal peptidoglycan, which are known to activate TLR2. Furthermore, when compared with wild-type macrophages, macrophages from mice that carry a spontaneous mutation in TLR4 (P712H) were hyporesponsive to both pneumolysin alone and the combination of pneumolysin with pneumococcal cell walls. Finally, these TLR4-mutant mice were significantly more susceptible to lethal infection after intranasal colonization with pneumolysin-positive pneumococci than were control mice. We conclude that the interaction of pneumolysin with TLR4 is critically involved in the innate immune response to pneumococcus.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12569171
      14. Call Number :
        140854
      15. Serial :
        7487
      1. Author :
        Kadurugamuwa, J. L.; Sin, L.; Albert, E.; Yu, J.; Francis, K.; DeBoer, M.; Rubin, M.; Bellinger-Kawahara, C.; Jr, T. R. Parr; Contag, P. R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2003
      5. Publication :
        Infection and Immunity
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        71
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals, Bioware, Xen29, Xen5, Biofilms/ growth & development, Catheterization, Central Venous/adverse effects, Chemiluminescent Measurements, Colony Count, Microbial, Disease Models, Animal, Female, Humans, Luciferases/genetics/metabolism, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Pseudomonas Infections/ microbiology, Pseudomonas aeruginosa/genetics/ growth & development, Staphylococcal Infections/ microbiology, Staphylococcus aureus/genetics/ growth & development IVIS, Xenogen
      12. Abstract :
        We have developed a rapid, continuous method for real-time monitoring of biofilms, both in vitro and in a mouse infection model, through noninvasive imaging of bioluminescent bacteria colonized on Teflon catheters. Two important biofilm-forming bacterial pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, were made bioluminescent by insertion of a complete lux operon. These bacteria produced significant bioluminescent signals for both in vitro studies and the development of an in vivo model, allowing effective real-time assessment of the physiological state of the biofilms. In vitro viable counts and light output were parallel and highly correlated (S. aureus r = 0.98; P. aeruginosa r = 0.99) and could be maintained for 10 days or longer, provided that growth medium was replenished every 12 h. In the murine model, subcutaneous implantation of the catheters (precolonized or postimplant infected) was well tolerated. An infecting dose of 10 (3) to 10 (5) CFU/catheter for S. aureus and P. aeruginosa resulted in a reproducible, localized infection surrounding the catheter that persisted until the termination of the experiment on day 20. Recovery of the bacteria from the catheters of infected animals showed that the bioluminescent signal corresponded to the CFU and that the lux constructs were highly stable even after many days in vivo. Since the metabolic activity of viable cells could be detected directly on the support matrix, nondestructively, and noninvasively, this method is especially appealing for the study of chronic biofilm infections and drug efficacy studies in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12540570
      14. Call Number :
        139339
      15. Serial :
        5926
      1. Author :
        Edinger, M; Cao, Y-a; Hornig, Y S; Jenkins, D E; Verneris, M R; Bachmann, M H; Negrin, R S; Contag, C H
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2002
      5. Publication :
        European journal of cancer (Oxford, England: 1990)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        38
      8. Issue :
        16
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Diagnostic Imaging; Forecasting; Luminescent Measurements; Mice; Models, Animal; Neoplasms; PC-3M-luc; Sensitivity and Specificity
      12. Abstract :
        Malignant disease is the final manifestation of complex molecular and cellular events leading to uncontrolled cellular proliferation and eventually tissue destruction and metastases. While the in vitro examination of cultured tumour cells permits the molecular dissection of early pathways in tumorigenesis on cellular and subcellular levels, only interrogation of these processes within the complexity of organ systems of the living animal can reveal the full range of pathophysiological changes that occur in neoplastic disease. Such analyses require technologies that facilitate the study of biological processes in vivo, and several approaches have been developed over the last few years. These strategies, in the nascent field of in vivo molecular and cellular imaging, combine molecular biology with imaging modalities as a means to real-time acquisition of functional information about disease processes in living systems. In this review, we will summarise recent developments in in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and discuss the potential of this imaging strategy for the future of cancer research.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12387838
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8983
      1. Author :
        Echchannaoui, H.; Frei, K.; Schnell, C.; Leib, S. L.; Zimmerli, W.; Landmann, R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2002
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Infectious Diseases
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        186
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals, Ceftriaxone/therapeutic use, Cephalosporins/therapeutic use, Disease Models, Animal, Disease Susceptibility, Drosophila Proteins, Inflammation/genetics/immunology/microbiology/pathology, Listeria Infections/genetics/immunology, Listeria monocytogenes/genetics/immunology, Membrane Glycoproteins/ deficiency/genetics, Meningitis, Bacterial/ genetics/ immunology/microbiology/pathology, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Pneumococcal Infections/genetics/immunology/microbiology/pathology, Receptors, Cell Surface/ deficiency/genetics, Streptococcus pneumoniae/ immunology, Time Factors, Toll-Like Receptor 2, Toll-Like Receptors IVIS, Xenogen, Xen10
      12. Abstract :
        Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2) mediates host responses to gram-positive bacterial wall components. TLR2 function was investigated in a murine Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis model in wild-type (wt) and TLR2-deficient (TLR2(-/-)) mice. TLR2(-/-) mice showed earlier time of death than wt mice (P<.02). Plasma interleukin-6 levels and bacterial numbers in blood and peripheral organs were similar for both strains. With ceftriaxone therapy, none of the wt but 27% of the TLR2(-/-) mice died (P<.04). Beyond 3 hours after infection, TLR2(-/-) mice had higher bacterial loads in brain than did wt mice, as assessed with luciferase-tagged S. pneumoniae by means of a Xenogen-CCD (charge-coupled device) camera. After 24 h, tumor necrosis factor activity was higher in cerebrospinal fluid of TLR2(-/-) than wt mice (P<.05) and was related to increased blood-brain barrier permeability (Evans blue staining, P<.02). In conclusion, the lack of TLR2 was associated with earlier death from meningitis, which was not due to sepsis but to reduced brain bacterial clearing, followed by increased intrathecal inflammation.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12198614
      14. Call Number :
        137638
      15. Serial :
        7950
      1. Author :
        Rice, B W; Cable, M D; Nelson, M B
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2001
      5. Publication :
        Journal of biomedical optics
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Diagnostic Imaging; Fluorescent Dyes; Green Fluorescent Proteins; Luciferases; Luminescent Measurements; Luminescent Proteins; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Neoplasms; PC-3M-luc; Pneumonia
      12. Abstract :
        In vivo imaging of cells tagged with light-emitting probes, such as firefly luciferase or fluorescent proteins, is a powerful technology that enables a wide range of biological studies in small research animals. Reporters with emission in the red to infrared (>600 nm) are preferred due to the low absorption in tissue at these wavelengths. Modeling of photon diffusion through tissue indicates that bioluminescent cell counts as low as a few hundred can be detected subcutaneously, while approximately 10(6) cells are required to detect signals at approximately 2 cm depth in tissue. Signal-to-noise estimates show that cooled back-thinned integrating charge coupled devices (CCDs) are preferred to image-intensified CCDs for this application, mainly due to their high quantum efficiency (approximately 85%) at wavelengths >600 nm where tissue absorption is low. Instrumentation for in vivo imaging developed at Xenogen is described and several examples of images of mice with bioluminescent cells are presented.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11728202
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8984
      1. Author :
        Francis, K P; Yu, J; Bellinger-Kawahara, C; Joh, D; Hawkinson, M J; Xiao, G; Purchio, T F; Caparon, M G; Lipsitch, M; Contag, P R
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2001
      5. Publication :
        Infection and immunity
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        69
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Amoxicillin; Animals; Bioware; DNA Transposable Elements; Female; Luminescent Measurements; Lung; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Nasopharynx; Operon; Promoter Regions, Genetic; pXen-5; Streptococcus pneumoniae; Transformation, Bacterial, Xen10, Xen7
      12. Abstract :
        Animal studies with Streptococcus pneumoniae have provided valuable models for drug development. In order to monitor long-term pneumococcal infections noninvasively in living mice, a novel gram-positive lux transposon cassette, Tn4001 luxABCDE Km(r), that allows random integration of lux genes onto the bacterial chromosome was constructed. The cassette was designed so that the luxABCDE and kanamycin resistance genes were linked to form a single promoterless operon. Bioluminescence and kanamycin resistance only occur in a bacterial cell if this operon has transposed downstream of a promoter on the bacterium's chromosome. S. pneumoniae D39 was transformed with plasmid pAUL-A Tn4001 luxABCDE Km(r), and a number of highly bioluminescent colonies were recovered. Genomic DNA from the brightest D39 strain was used to transform a number of clinical S. pneumoniae isolates, and several of these strains were tested in animal models, including a pneumococcal lung infection model. Strong bioluminescent signals were seen in the lungs of the animals containing these pneumococci, allowing the course and antibiotic treatment of the infections to be readily monitored in real time in the living animals. Recovery of the bacteria from the animals showed that the bioluminescent signal corresponded to the number of CFU and that the lux construct was highly stable even after several days in vivo. We believe that this lux transposon will greatly expand the ability to evaluate drug efficacy against gram-positive bacteria in living animals using bioluminescence.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11292758
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9027
      1. Author :
        Contag, C H; Jenkins, D; Contag, P R; Negrin, R S
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2000
      5. Publication :
        Neoplasia (New York, N.Y.)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2
      8. Issue :
        1-2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Diagnostic Imaging; Genes, Reporter; Green Fluorescent Proteins; Humans; Luciferases; Luminescent Proteins; Neoplasms; PC-3M-luc; Time Factors; Tumor Cells, Cultured
      12. Abstract :
        Revealing the cellular and molecular changes associated with cancer, as they occur in intact living animal models of human neoplastic disease, holds tremendous potential for understanding disease mechanisms and elucidating effective therapies. Since light is transmitted through mammalian tissues, at a low level, optical signatures conferred on tumor cells by expression of reporter genes encoding bioluminescent and fluorescent proteins can be detected externally using sensitive photon detection systems. Expression of reporter genes, such as the bioluminescent enzyme firefly luciferase (Luc) or variants of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in transformed cells, can effectively be used to reveal molecular and cellular features of neoplasia in vivo. Tumor cell growth and regression in response to various therapies have been evaluated non-invasively in living experimental animals using these reporter genes. Detection of Luc-labeled cells in vivo was extremely sensitive with signals over background from as few as 1000 human tumor cells distributed throughout the peritoneal cavity of a mouse with linear relationships between cell number and signal intensity over five logs. GFP offers the strength of high-resolution ex vivo analyses following in vivo localization of the tumor. The dynamic range of Luc detection allows the full disease course to be monitored since disease progression from small numbers of cells to extensive disease can be assessed. As such, therapies that target minimal disease as well as those designed for late stage disease can be readily evaluated in animal models. Real time spatiotemporal analyses of tumor cell growth can reveal the dynamics of neoplastic disease, and facilitate rapid optimization of effective treatment regimens. Thus, these methods improve the predictability of animal models of human disease as study groups can be followed over time, and can accelerate the development of therapeutic strategies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10933067
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8985
      1. Author :
        Kristof Schutters and Chris Reutelingsperger
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Apoptosis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        15
      8. Issue :
        9
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Apoptosis; Phosphatidylserine; Annexin A5; Molecular Imaging; Targeted Drug Delivery; in vivo imaging; FMT; fluorescence molecular tomography; Annexin-Vivo
      12. Abstract :
        Cells are able to execute apoptosis by activating series of specific biochemical reactions. One of the most prominent characteristics of cell death is the externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS), which in healthy cells resides predominantly in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. These features have made PS-externalization a well-explored phenomenon to image cell death for diagnostic purposes. In addition, it was demonstrated that under certain conditions viable cells express PS at their surface such as endothelial cells of tumor blood vessels, stressed tumor cells and hypoxic cardiomyocytes. Hence, PS has become a potential target for therapeutic strategies aiming at Targeted Drug Delivery. In this review we highlight the biomarker PS and various PS-binding compounds that have been employed to target PS for diagnostic purposes. We emphasize the 35 kD human protein annexin A5, that has been developed as a Molecular Imaging agent to measure cell death in vitro, and non-invasively in vivo in animal models and in patients with cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Recently focus has shifted from diagnostic towards therapeutic applications employing annexin A5 in strategies to deliver drugs to cells that express PS at their surface.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2929432/?tool=pubmed
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4562
      1. Author :
        Thomas Reiner, Rainer H. Kohler, Chong Wee Liew, Jonathan Hill, Jason Gaglia, Rohit Kulkarni and Ralph Weissleder
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Bioconjugate Chemistry
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        21
      8. Issue :
        7
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Metabolic Disorders
      11. Keywords :
        Beta-cells; GLP1-R; imaging; targeting; in vivo imaging; VivoTag; AngioSense; Diabetes
      12. Abstract :
        The ability to image and ultimately quantitate beta-cell mass in vivo will likely have far reaching implications in the study of diabetes biology, in the monitoring of disease progression or response to treatment, as well as for drug development. Here, using animal models, we report on the synthesis, characterization of, and intravital microscopic imaging properties of a near infrared fluorescent exendin-4 analogue with specificity for the GLP-1 receptor on beta cells (E4K12-Fl). The agent demonstrated sub-nanomolar EC50 binding concentrations, with high specificity and binding could be inhibited by GLP-1R agonists. Following intravenous administration to mice, pancreatic islets were readily distinguishable from exocrine pancreas, achieving target-to-background ratios within the pancreas of 6:1, as measured by intravital microscopy. Serial imaging revealed rapid accumulation kinetics (with initial signal within the islets detectable within 3 minutes and peak fluorescence within 20 minutes of injection) making this an ideal agent for in vivo imaging.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2912453/?tool=pubmed
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4561
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