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      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Angiogenesis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        13
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        angiogenesis imaging; in vivo imaging; Angiogenesis; Bioluminescence; Fluorescence; Molecular imaging; Optical imaging
      12. Abstract :
        In recent years, molecular imaging gained significant importance in biomedical research. Optical imaging developed into a modality which enables the visualization and quantification of all kinds of cellular processes and cancerous cell growth in small animals. Novel gene reporter mice and cell lines and the development of targeted and cleavable fluorescent “smart” probes form a powerful imaging toolbox. The development of systems collecting tomographic bioluminescence and fluorescence data enabled even more spatial accuracy and more quantitative measurements. Here we describe various bioluminescent and fluorescent gene reporter models and probes that can be used to specifically image and quantify neovascularization or the angiogenic process itself.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2911541/
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4488
      1. Author :
        Zongjin Li, Kitchener D. Wilson, Bryan Smith, Daniel L. Kraft, Fangjun Jia, Mei Huang, Xiaoyan Xie, Robert C. Robbins, Sanjiv S. Gambhir, Irving L. Weissman and Joseph C. Wu
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        4
      8. Issue :
        12
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        in vivo imaging; human embryonic stem cells; hESCs; endothelial cells; ECs; AngioSense
      12. Abstract :
        Background: Differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into endothelial cells (hESC-ECs) has the potential to provide an unlimited source of cells for novel transplantation therapies of ischemic diseases by supporting angiogenesis and vasculogenesis. However, the endothelial differentiation efficiency of the conventional embryoid body (EB) method is low while the 2-dimensional method of co-culturing with mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) require animal product, both of which can limit the future clinical application of hESC-ECs. Moreover, to fully understand the beneficial effects of stem cell therapy, investigators must be able to track the functional biology and physiology of transplanted cells in living subjects over time.

        Methodology: In this study, we developed an extracellular matrix (ECM) culture system for increasing endothelial differentiation and free from contaminating animal cells. We investigated the transcriptional changes that occur during endothelial differentiation of hESCs using whole genome microarray, and compared to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We also showed functional vascular formation by hESC-ECs in a mouse dorsal window model. Moreover, our study is the first so far to transplant hESC-ECs in a myocardial infarction model and monitor cell fate using molecular imaging methods.

        Conclusion: Taken together, we report a more efficient method for derivation of hESC-ECs that express appropriate patterns of endothelial genes, form functional vessels in vivo, and improve cardiac function. These studies suggest that hESC-ECs may provide a novel therapy for ischemic heart disease in the future.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2795856/?tool=pubmed
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4557
      1. Author :
        Matthias Nahrendorf, Peter Waterman, Greg Thurber, Kevin Groves, Milind Rajopadhye, Peter Panizzi, Brett Marinelli, Elena Aikawa, Mikael J Pittet, Filip K Swirski and Ralph Weissleder
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        29
      8. Issue :
        10
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        FMT-CT; molecular imaging; atherosclerosis; protease activity; inflammation; in vivo imaging; fluorescence molecular tomography; ProSense
      12. Abstract :
        Objective: Proteases are emerging biomarkers of inflammatory diseases. In atherosclerosis, these enzymes are often secreted by inflammatory macrophages, digest the extracellular matrix of the fibrous cap and destabilize atheromata. Protease function can be monitored with protease activatable imaging probes and quantitated in vivo by fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT). To address two major constraints currently associated with imaging of murine atherosclerosis (lack of highly sensitive probes and absence of anatomical information), we compared protease sensors (PS) of variable size and pharmacokinetics and co-registered FMT datasets with computed tomography (FMT-CT).

        Methods and results: Co-registration of FMT and CT was achieved with a multimodal imaging cartridge containing fiducial markers detectable by both modalities. A high-resolution CT angiography protocol accurately localized fluorescence to the aortic root of atherosclerotic apoE-/- mice. To identify suitable sensors, we first modeled signal kinetics in-silico and then compared three probes with identical oligo-L-lysine cleavage sequences: PS-5, 5nm in diameter containing 2 fluorochromes , PS-25, a 25nm version with an elongated lysine chain and PS-40, a polymeric nanoparticle. Serial FMT-CT showed fastest kinetics for PS-5 but, surprisingly, highest fluorescence in lesions of the aortic root for PS-40. PS-40 robustly reported therapeutic effects of atorvastatin, corroborated by ex vivo imaging and qPCR for the model protease cathepsin B.

        Conclusions: FMT-CT is a robust and observer-independent tool for non-invasive assessment of inflammatory murine atherosclerosis. Reporter-containing nanomaterials may have unique advantages over small molecule agents for in vivo imaging.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2746251/?tool=pubmed
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4568
      1. Author :
        Farouc A. Jaffer, Peter Libby and Ralph Weissleder
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        29
      8. Issue :
        7
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        In vivo imaging; fluorescence molecular tomography; FMT; ProSense; OsteoSense; atherosclerosis; molecular imaging; optical, fluorescence; multimodality; nanoparticle
      12. Abstract :
        Imaging approaches that visualize molecular targets rather than anatomic structures aim to illuminate vital molecular and cellular aspects of atherosclerosis biology in vivo. Several such molecular imaging strategies stand ready for rapid clinical application. This review describes the growing role of in vivo optical molecular imaging in atherosclerosis and highlights its ability to visualize atheroma inflammation, calcification, and angiogenesis. In addition, we discuss advances in multimodality probes, both in the context of multimodal imaging as well as multifunctional, or “theranostic,” nanoparticles. This review highlights particular molecular imaging strategies that possess strong potential for clinical translation.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2733228/?tool=pubmed
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4642
      1. Author :
        Rosenzweig HL, Jann MM, Glant TT, Martin TM, Planck SR, van Eden W, van Kooten PJ, Flavell RA, Kobayashi KS, Rosenbaum JT and Davey MP
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Leukocyte Biology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        85
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Physiology
      11. Keywords :
        ProSense; in vivo imaging; NOD2; mice; inflammatory arthritis; TCR transgenic; knockout
      12. Abstract :
        In addition to its role in innate immunity, nucleotide oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) has been shown to play a suppressive role in models of colitis. Notably, mutations in NOD2 cause the inherited granulomatous disease of the joints called Blau syndrome, thereby linking NOD2 with joint disease as well. However, the role of NOD2 in joint inflammation has not been clarified. We demonstrate here that NOD2 is functional within the mouse joint and promotes inflammation, as locally or systemically administered muramyl dipeptide (MDP; the NOD2 agonist) resulted in significant joint inflammation that was abolished in NOD2-deficient mice. We then sought to investigate the role of NOD2 in a mouse model of inflammatory arthritis dependent on adaptive immunity using TCR-transgenic mice whose T cells recognized the dominant epitope of proteoglycan (PG). Mice immunized with PG in the presence of MDP developed a more severe inflammatory arthritis and histopathology within the joints. Antigen-specific activation of splenocytes was enhanced by MDP with respect to IFN-gamma production, which would be consistent with the Th1-mediated disease in vivo. Intriguingly, NOD2 deficiency did not alter the PG-induced arthritis, indicating that NOD2 does not play an essential role in this model of joint disease when it is not activated by MDP. In conclusion, we demonstrate that in a model of inflammatory arthritis dependent on T and B cell priming, NOD2 activation potentiates disease. However, the absence of NOD2 does not alter the course of inflammatory arthritis, in contrast to models of intestinal inflammation.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2718807/?tool=pubmed
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4535
      1. Author :
        John Baeten; Jodi Haller; Helen Shih; Vasilis Ntziachristos
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Neoplasia
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        11
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        in vivo imaging; optical imaging; breast cancer; molecular imaging
      12. Abstract :
        Optical imaging of breast cancer has been considered for detecting functional and molecular characteristics of diseases in clinical and preclinical settings. Applied to laboratory research, photonic investigations offer a highly versatile tool for preclinical imaging and drug discovery. A particular advantage of the optical method is the availability of multiple spectral bands for performing imaging. Herein, we capitalize on this feature to demonstrate how it is possible to use different wavelengths to offer internal controls and significantly improve the observation accuracy in molecular imaging applications. In particular, we show the independent in vivo detection of cysteine proteases along with tumor permeability and interstitial volume measurements using a dual-wavelength approach. To generate results with a view toward clinically geared studies, a transgenic Her2/neu mouse model that spontaneously developed mammary tumors was used. In vivo findings were validated against conventional ex vivo tests such as histology and Western blot analyses. By correcting for biodistribution parameters, the dual-wavelength method increases the accuracy of molecular observations by separating true molecular target from probe biodistribution. As such, the method is highly appropriate for molecular imaging studies where often probe delivery and target presence are not independently assessed. On the basis of these findings, we propose the dual-wavelength/normalization approach as an essential method for drug discovery and preclinical imaging studies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2647724/
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4494
      1. Author :
        David E Sosnovik, Matthias Nahrendorf and Ralph Weissleder
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Nature Reviews Cardiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        in vivo imaging; fluorescence imaging, molecular imaging, MRI, myocardium, SPECT; MMPSense
      12. Abstract :
        Molecular imaging agents can be targeted to a specific receptor or protein on the cardiomyocyte surface, or to enzymes released into the interstitial space, such as cathepsins, matrix metalloproteinases and myeloperoxidase. Molecular imaging of the myocardium, however, requires the imaging agent to be small, sensitive (nanomolar levels or better), and able to gain access to the interstitial space. Several novel agents that fulfill these criteria have been used for targeted molecular imaging applications in the myocardium. Magnetic resonance, fluorescence, and single-photon emission CT have been used to image the molecular signals generated by these agents. The use of targeted imaging agents in the myocardium has the potential to provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of myocardial injury and to facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2597275/?tool=pubmed
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4650
      1. Author :
        Virna Cortez-Retamozo, Filip K. Swirski, Peter Waterman, Hushan Yuan, Jose Luiz Figueiredo, Andita P. Newton, Rabi Upadhyay, Claudio Vinegoni, Rainer Kohler, Joseph Blois, Adam Smith, Matthias Nahrendorf, Lee Josephson, Ralph Weissleder and Mikael J. Pittet
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Clinical Investigation
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        118
      8. Issue :
        12
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Physiology
      11. Keywords :
        FMT; in vivo imaging; ProSense; MMPSense
      12. Abstract :
        Eosinophils are multifunctional leukocytes that degrade and remodel tissue extracellular matrix through production of proteolytic enzymes, release of proinflammatory factors to initiate and propagate inflammatory responses, and direct activation of mucus secretion and smooth muscle cell constriction. Thus, eosinophils are central effector cells during allergic airway inflammation and an important clinical therapeutic target. Here we describe the use of an injectable MMP-targeted optical sensor that specifically and quantitatively resolves eosinophil activity in the lungs of mice with experimental allergic airway inflammation. Through the use of real-time molecular imaging methods, we report the visualization of eosinophil responses in vivo and at different scales. Eosinophil responses were seen at single-cell resolution in conducting airways using near-infrared fluorescence fiberoptic bronchoscopy, in lung parenchyma using intravital microscopy, and in the whole body using fluorescence-mediated molecular tomography. Using these real-time imaging methods, we confirmed the immunosuppressive effects of the glucocorticoid drug dexamethasone in the mouse model of allergic airway inflammation and identified a viridin-derived prodrug that potently inhibited the accumulation and enzyme activity of eosinophils in the lungs. The combination of sensitive enzyme-targeted sensors with noninvasive molecular imaging approaches permitted evaluation of airway inflammation severity and was used as a model to rapidly screen for new drug effects. Both fluorescence-mediated tomography and fiberoptic bronchoscopy techniques have the potential to be translated into the clinic.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2579705/?tool=pubmed
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4536
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