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      1. Author :
        Ibarra, J. M.; Jimenez, F.; Martinez, H. G.; Clark, K.; Ahuja, S. S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Int J Inflam
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2011
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MMPSense, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        The Standard measures of experimental arthritis fail to detect, visualize, and quantify early inflammation and disease activity. Here, we describe the use of an injectable MMP-activated fluorescence agent for in vivo quantification of acute inflammation produced by collagen-antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) in CC chemokine receptor-2 (Ccr2(-/-)) null mice. Although Ccr2(-/-) DBA1/J mice were highly susceptible to and rapidly developed CAIA, the standard clinical assessment of fore or hind paw thicknesses was unable to detect significant acute inflammatory changes (days 3-10). Remarkably, noninvasive, in situ, MMP-activatable fluorescent imaging of Ccr2(-/-) DBA1/J mice with CAIA displayed acute joint pathology in advance of clinically measurable acute inflammation (days 5, 7, and 10). These results were confirmed by the histology of ankle joints, which showed significant inflammation, bone loss, and synovial hyperplasia, compared to control mice at postimmunization day 5. The MMP-mediated fluorescence technique holds tremendous implications for quantifiable examination of arthritis disease activity of acute joint inflammation.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21755029
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10462
      1. Author :
        Al Marzouqi, N.; Iratni, R.; Nemmar, A.; Arafat, K.; Ahmed Al Sultan, M.; Yasin, J.; Collin, P.; Mester, J.; Adrian, T. E.; Attoub, S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Eur J Pharmacol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-luc2, IVIS, Breast Cancer, Bioware
      12. Abstract :
        Breast cancer is a major challenge for pharmacologists to develop new drugs to improve the survival of cancer patients. Frondoside A is a triterpenoid glycoside isolated from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria frondosa. It has been demonstrated that Frondoside A inhibited the growth of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We investigated the impact of Frondoside A on human breast cancer cell survival, migration and invasion in vitro, and on tumor growth in nude mice, using the human estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. The non-tumorigenic MCF10-A cell line derived from normal human mammary epithelium was used as control. Frondoside A (0.01-5muM) decreased the viability of breast cancer cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, with 50%-effective concentration (EC50) of 2.5muM at 24h. MCF10-A cells were more resistant to the cytotoxic effect of Frondoside A (EC50 superior to 5muM at 24h). In the MDA-MB-231 cells, Frondoside A effectively increased the sub-G1 (apoptotic) cell fraction through the activation of p53, and subsequently the caspases 9 and 3/7 cell death pathways. In addition, Frondoside A induced a concentration-dependent inhibition of MDA-MB-231 cell migration and invasion. In vivo, Frondoside A (100mug/kg/dayi.p. for 24days) strongly decreased the growth of MDA-MB-231 tumor xenografts in athymic mice, without manifest toxic side-effects. Moreover, we found that Frondoside A could enhance the killing of breast cancer cells induced by the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel. These findings identify Frondoside A as a promising novel therapeutic agent for breast cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21741966
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 7
      15. Serial :
        10490
      1. Author :
        Marra, M.; Salzano, G.; Leonetti, C.; Porru, M.; Franco, R.; Zappavigna, S.; Liguori, G.; Botti, G.; Chieffi, P.; Lamberti, M.; Vitale, G.; Abbruzzese, A.; La Rotonda, M. I.; De Rosa, G.; Caraglia, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Biotechnol Adv
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        PC-3M-luc2, PC3M-luc2, IVIS, Prostate Cancer, Bioware
      12. Abstract :
        Zoledronic acid (ZOL) is a drug whose potent anti-cancer activity is limited by its short plasma half-life and rapid uptake and accumulation within bone. We have recently proposed new delivery systems to avoid ZOL accumulation into the bone, thus improving extra-skeletal bioavailability. In this work, we have compared the technological and anti-cancer features of either ZOL-containing self-assembly PEGylated nanoparticles (NPs) or ZOL-encapsulating PEGylated liposomes (LIPO-ZOL). ZOL-containing NPs showed superior technological characteristics in terms of mean diameter, size distribution, and ZOL encapsulation efficiency, compared to LIPO-ZOL. Moreover, the anti-cancer activity of NPs in nude mice xenografted with prostate cancer PC3 cells was higher than that one induced by LIPO-ZOL. In addition, NPs induced the complete remission of tumour xenografts and an increase of survival time higher than that one observed with LIPO-ZOL. It has also to be considered that PC3 tumour xenografts were almost completely resistant to the anti-cancer effects induced by free ZOL. Both nanotechnological products did not induce toxic effects not affecting the mice weight nor inducing deaths. Moreover, the histological examination of some vital organs such as liver, kidney and spleen did not find any changes in terms of necrotic effects or modifications in the inflammatory infiltrate. On the other hand, NPs but not LIPO-ZOL caused a statistically significant reduction of the tumour associated macrophages (TAM) in tumour xenografts. This effect was paralleled by a significant increase of both necrotic and apoptotic indexes. The effects of the NPs were also higher in terms of neo-angiogenesis inhibition. These results suggest the future preclinical development of ZOL-encapsulating NPs in the treatment of human cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21741464
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10488
      1. Author :
        Meincke, M.; Tiwari, S.; Hattermann, K.; Kalthoff, H.; Mentlein, R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Clin Exp Metastasis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        28
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Breast Neoplasms/metabolism/*pathology; Cattle; Chemokine CXCL12/metabolism; Female; Fluorescent Dyes/diagnostic use; Glioma/metabolism/*pathology; Humans; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; Mice; Mice, Nude; Receptors, CXCR/*metabolism; Receptors, CXCR4/*metabolism; Serum Albumin, Bovine/metabolism; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared; Tumor Cells, Cultured
      12. Abstract :
        The chemokine CXCL12/SDF-1 and its receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7 play a major role in tumor invasion, proliferation and metastasis. Since both receptors are overexpressed on distinct tumor cells and on the tumor vasculature, we evaluated their potential as targets for detection of cancers by molecular imaging. We synthesized conjugates of CXCL12 and the near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye IRDye((R))800CW, tested their selectivity, sensitivity and biological activity in vitro and their feasibility to visualize tumors in vivo. Purified CXCL12-conjugates detected in vitro as low as 500 A764 human glioma cells or MCF-7 breast cancer cells that express CXCR7 alone or together with CXCR4. Binding was time- and concentration-dependent, and the label could be competitively displaced by the native peptide. Control conjugates with bovine serum albumin or lactalbumin failed to label the cells. In mice, the conjugate distributed rapidly. After 1-92 h, subcutaneous tumors of human MCF-7 and A764 cells in immunodeficient mice were detected with high sensitivity. Background was observed in particular in liver within the first 24 h, but also skull and hind limbs yielded some background. Overall, fluorescent CXCL12-conjugates are sensitive and selective probes to detect solid and metastatic tumors by targeting tumor cells and tumor vasculature.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21735100
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 13
      15. Serial :
        10372
      1. Author :
        Hu, Z.; Gerseny, H.; Zhang, Z.; Chen, Y. J.; Berg, A.; Stock, S.; Seth, P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Mol Ther
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        19
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-luc2, IVIS, Breast Cancer, Bioware
      12. Abstract :
        In recent years, oncolytic adenoviruses have shown some promise as a novel class of antitumor agents. However, their utility in targeting bone metastases is relatively less studied. We have examined whether the systemic therapy of oncolytic adenoviruses expressing the soluble form of transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) receptor II fused with human immunoglobulin G1 can be developed for the treatment of established breast cancer bone metastases. MDA-MB-231-luc2 human breast cancer cells were injected in the left heart ventricle of nude mice to establish bone metastasis. Mice with hind limb tumors were administered (on days 8 and 11) oncolytic adenoviruses-Ad.sTbetaRFc or mhTERTAd.sTbetaRFc. Skeletal tumor growth was monitored weekly by bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and radiography. At the termination time on day 28, hind limb bones were analyzed for tumor burden, synchrotron micro-computed tomography, and osteoclast activation. Intravenous delivery of Ad.sTbetaRFc and mhTERTAd.sTbetaRFc induced significant inhibition of tumor growth, reduction of tumor burden, osteoclast activation, and increased animals' survival. Oncolytic adenoviruses were safer than dl309, a wild-type virus. A slight elevation of liver enzyme activity was observed after Ad.sTbetaRFc administration; this subsided with time. Based on these studies, we believe that Ad.sTbetaRFc and mhTERTAd.sTbetaRFc can be developed as a safe and effective approach for the treatment of established bone metastasis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21712815
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 8
      15. Serial :
        10493
      1. Author :
        Mathew, B.; Jacobson, J. R.; Berdyshev, E.; Huang, Y.; Sun, X.; Zhao, Y.; Gerhold, L. M.; Siegler, J.; Evenoski, C.; Wang, T.; Zhou, T.; Zaidi, R.; Moreno-Vinasco, L.; Bittman, R.; Chen, C. T.; LaRiviere, P. J.; Sammani, S.; Lussier, Y. A.; Dudek, S. M.; Natarajan, V.; Weichselbaum, R. R.; Garcia, J. G.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Faseb J
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        25
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/chemistry; Ceramides/metabolism; Female; Gene Deletion; Gene Expression Regulation/physiology; Lung/*radiation effects; Lysophospholipids/*chemistry/*pharmacology; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; *Radiation Injuries, Experimental; Receptors, Lysosphingolipid/genetics/metabolism; Sphingolipids/*metabolism; Sphingosine/*analogs & derivatives/chemistry/pharmacology
      12. Abstract :
        Clinically significant radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common toxicity in patients administered thoracic radiotherapy. Although the molecular etiology is poorly understood, we previously characterized a murine model of RILI in which alterations in lung barrier integrity surfaced as a potentially important pathobiological event and genome-wide lung gene mRNA levels identified dysregulation of sphingolipid metabolic pathway genes. We hypothesized that sphingolipid signaling components serve as modulators and novel therapeutic targets of RILI. Sphingolipid involvement in murine RILI was confirmed by radiation-induced increases in lung expression of sphingosine kinase (SphK) isoforms 1 and 2 and increases in the ratio of ceramide to sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and dihydro-S1P (DHS1P) levels in plasma, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and lung tissue. Mice with a targeted deletion of SphK1 (SphK1(-/-)) or with reduced expression of S1P receptors (S1PR1(+/-), S1PR2(-/-), and S1PR3(-/-)) exhibited marked RILI susceptibility. Finally, studies of 3 potent vascular barrier-protective S1P analogs, FTY720, (S)-FTY720-phosphonate (fTyS), and SEW-2871, identified significant RILI attenuation and radiation-induced gene dysregulation by the phosphonate analog, fTyS (0.1 and 1 mg/kg i.p., 2x/wk) and to a lesser degree by SEW-2871 (1 mg/kg i.p., 2x/wk), compared with those in controls. These results support the targeting of S1P signaling as a novel therapeutic strategy in RILI.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21712494
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 18
      15. Serial :
        10371
      1. Author :
        Vandamme, M.; Robert, E.; Lerondel, S.; Sarron, V.; Ries, D.; Dozias, S.; Sobilo, J.; Gosset, D.; Kieda, C.; Legrain, B.; Pouvesle, J. M.; Pape, A. L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Int J Cancer
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        U87-MG-luc2, U-87-MG-luc2, U87MG-luc2, Bioluminescence, Glioma, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        Non-thermal plasma (NTP) is generated by ionizing neutral gas molecules/atoms leading to a highly reactive gas at ambient temperature containing excited molecules, reactive species and generating transient electric fields. Given its potential to interact with tissue or cells without a significant temperature increase, NTP appears as a promising approach for the treatment of various diseases including cancer. The aim of our study was to evaluate the interest of NTP both in vitro and in vivo. To this end, we evaluated the antitumor activity of NTP in vitro on two human cancer cell lines (glioblastoma U87MG and colorectal carcinoma HCT-116). Our data showed that NTP generated a large amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to the formation of DNA damages. This resulted in a multiphase cell cycle arrest and a subsequent apoptosis induction. In addition, in vivo experiments on U87MG bearing mice showed that NTP induced a reduction of bioluminescence and tumor volume as compared to nontreated mice. An induction of apoptosis was also observed together with an accumulation of cells in S phase of the cell cycle suggesting an arrest of tumor proliferation. In conclusion, we demonstrated here that the potential of NTP to generate ROS renders this strategy particularly promising in the context of tumor treatment.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21702038
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10424
      1. Author :
        Vandamme, M.; Robert, E.; Lerondel, S.; Sarron, V.; Ries, D.; Dozias, S.; Sobilo, J.; Gosset, D.; Kieda, C.; Legrain, B.; Pouvesle, J. M.; Pape, A. L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Int J Cancer
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        HCT-116-luc2, IVIS, Bioware, HCT116-luc2
      12. Abstract :
        Non-thermal plasma (NTP) is generated by ionizing neutral gas molecules/atoms leading to a highly reactive gas at ambient temperature containing excited molecules, reactive species and generating transient electric fields. Given its potential to interact with tissue or cells without a significant temperature increase, NTP appears as a promising approach for the treatment of various diseases including cancer. The aim of our study was to evaluate the interest of NTP both in vitro and in vivo. To this end, we evaluated the antitumor activity of NTP in vitro on two human cancer cell lines (glioblastoma U87MG and colorectal carcinoma HCT-116). Our data showed that NTP generated a large amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to the formation of DNA damages. This resulted in a multiphase cell cycle arrest and a subsequent apoptosis induction. In addition, in vivo experiments on U87MG bearing mice showed that NTP induced a reduction of bioluminescence and tumor volume as compared to nontreated mice. An induction of apoptosis was also observed together with an accumulation of cells in S phase of the cell cycle suggesting an arrest of tumor proliferation. In conclusion, we demonstrated here that the potential of NTP to generate ROS renders this strategy particularly promising in the context of tumor treatment.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21702038
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10498
      1. Author :
        Zhou, H.; Roy, S.; Cochran, E.; Zouaoui, R.; Chu, C. L.; Duffner, J.; Zhao, G.; Smith, S.; Galcheva-Gargova, Z.; Karlgren, J.; Dussault, N.; Kwan, R. Y.; Moy, E.; Barnes, M.; Long, A.; Honan, C.; Qi, Y. W.; Shriver, Z.; Ganguly, T.; Schultes, B.; Venkataraman, G.; Kishimoto, T. K.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, 4T1-luc2
      12. Abstract :
        Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) play a key role in shaping the tumor microenvironment by presenting growth factors, cytokines, and other soluble factors that are critical for host cell recruitment and activation, as well as promoting tumor progression, metastasis, and survival. M402 is a rationally engineered, non-cytotoxic heparan sulfate (HS) mimetic, designed to inhibit multiple factors implicated in tumor-host cell interactions, including VEGF, FGF2, SDF-1alpha, P-selectin, and heparanase. A single s.c. dose of M402 effectively inhibited seeding of B16F10 murine melanoma cells to the lung in an experimental metastasis model. Fluorescent-labeled M402 demonstrated selective accumulation in the primary tumor. Immunohistological analyses of the primary tumor revealed a decrease in microvessel density in M402 treated animals, suggesting anti-angiogenesis to be one of the mechanisms involved in-vivo. M402 treatment also normalized circulating levels of myeloid derived suppressor cells in tumor bearing mice. Chronic administration of M402, alone or in combination with cisplatin or docetaxel, inhibited spontaneous metastasis and prolonged survival in an orthotopic 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma model. These data demonstrate that modulating HSPG biology represents a novel approach to target multiple factors involved in tumor progression and metastasis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21698156
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10362
      1. Author :
        Hanai, J.; Doro, N.; Sasaki, A. T.; Kobayashi, S.; Cantley, L. C.; Seth, P.; Sukhatme, V. P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Cell Physiol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        227
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        A549-luc-C8, A549-luc, IVIS, Bioware, ATP Citrate (pro-S)-Lyase/*antagonists & inhibitors/genetics; Animals; Apoptosis; Cell Cycle; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Proliferation; Combined Modality Therapy; Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition; Female; Gene Knockdown Techniques; Humans; Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/*therapeutic use; Lung Neoplasms/*drug therapy/enzymology/pathology/*therapy; MAP Kinase Signaling System/drug effects; Mice; Mutation; Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/antagonists & inhibitors; Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor/genetics; Signal Transduction/drug effects; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        ATP citrate lyase (ACL) catalyzes the conversion of cytosolic citrate to acetyl-CoA and oxaloacetate. A definitive role for ACL in tumorigenesis has emerged from ACL RNAi and chemical inhibitor studies, showing that ACL inhibition limits tumor cell proliferation and survival and induces differentiation in vitro. In vivo, it reduces tumor growth leading to a cytostatic effect and induces differentiation. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood and agents that could enhance the efficacy of ACL inhibition have not been identified. Our studies focus on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) lines, which show phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT activation secondary to a mutation in the K-Ras gene or the EGFR gene. Here we show that ACL knockdown promotes apoptosis and differentiation, leading to the inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. Moreover, in contrast to most studies, which elucidate how activation/suppression of signaling pathways can modify metabolism, we show that inhibition of a metabolic pathway “reverse signals” and attenuates PI3K/AKT signaling. Additionally, we find that statins, inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, which act downstream of ACL in the cholesterol synthesis pathway, dramatically enhance the anti-tumor effects of ACL inhibition, even regressing established tumors. With statin treatment, both PI3K/AKT and the MAPK pathways are affected. Moreover, this combined treatment is able to reduce the growth of EGF receptor resistant tumor cell types. Given the essential role of lipid synthesis in numerous cancers, this work may impact therapy in a broad range of tumors.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21688263
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 10
      15. Serial :
        10523
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