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      1. Author :
        Lu, Z.; Dai, T.; Huang, L.; Kurup, D. B.; Tegos, G. P.; Jahnke, A.; Wharton, T.; Hamblin, M. R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Nanomedicine (Lond)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen44, Xen 44, Proteus mirabilis, bioluminescence imaging, Animals; Fullerenes/*chemistry; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Photochemotherapy/*methods; Photosensitizing Agents/*chemistry; Pseudomonas Infections/*drug therapy; Pseudomonas aeruginosa/drug effects; Wound Infection/*drug therapy
      12. Abstract :
        AIMS: Fullerenes are under intensive study for potential biomedical applications. We have previously reported that a C60 fullerene functionalized with three dimethylpyrrolidinium groups (BF6) is a highly active broad-spectrum antimicrobial photosensitizer in vitro when combined with white-light illumination. We asked whether this high degree of in vitro activity would translate into an in vivo therapeutic effect in two potentially lethal mouse models of infected wounds. MATERIALS & METHODS: We used stable bioluminescent bacteria and a low light imaging system to follow the progress of the infection noninvasively in real time. An excisional wound on the mouse back was contaminated with one of two bioluminescent Gram-negative species, Proteus mirabilis (2.5 x 10(7) cells) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5 x 10(6) cells). A solution of BF6 was placed into the wound followed by delivery of up to 180 J/cm(2) of broadband white light (400-700 nm). RESULTS: In both cases there was a light-dose-dependent reduction of bioluminescence from the wound not observed in control groups (light alone or BF6 alone). Fullerene-mediated photodynamic therapy of mice infected with P. mirabilis led to 82% survival compared with 8% survival without treatment (p < 0.001). Photodynamic therapy of mice infected with highly virulent P. aeruginosa did not lead to survival, but when photodynamic therapy was combined with a suboptimal dose of the antibiotic tobramycin (6 mg/kg for 1 day) there was a synergistic therapeutic effect with a survival of 60% compared with a survival of 20% with tobramycin alone (p < 0.01). CONCLUSION: These data suggest that cationic fullerenes have clinical potential as an antimicrobial photosensitizer for superficial infections where red light is not needed to penetrate tissue.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21143031
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10563
      1. Author :
        Korotcov, Alexandru; Shan, Liang; Meng, Huan; Wang, Tongxin; Sridhar, Rajagopalan; Zhao, Yuliang; Liang, Xing-Jie; Wang, Paul C
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Journal of nanoscience and nanotechnology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        10
      8. Issue :
        11
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Contrast Media; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Mice; Nanotechnology; PC-3M-luc
      12. Abstract :
        We have developed and tested a liposomal nanocomplex system, which contains Gd-DTPA as a payload and transferrin on the surface, as a tumor specific targeting MRI contrast agent for studying prostate cancer tumors in mice. In vivo, the probe significantly enhanced the MRI signal. The image contrast between the peripheral region of the tumor and the non-involved muscle was nearly 50% higher two hours after administration of the nanocomplex. The liposomal nanocomplex increased the amount of Gd accumulated in tumors by factor 2.8 compared to that accumulated by using Magnevist alone. Moreover, the heterogeneous MRI image features correlate well with the tumor pathology. The image enhancement patterns can be used for cancer prognosis and non-invasive monitoring of the response to therapy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21137979
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8963
      1. Author :
        Wen, D.; Qing, L.; Harrison, G.; Golub, E.; Akintoye, S. O.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Oral Dis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        17
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        427-32
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, Maestro, Animals; Bone Density Conservation Agents/administration & dosage/*pharmacokinetics; Bone and Bones/*metabolism; Calcium/metabolism; Chelating Agents; Decalcification Technique; Diphosphonates/administration & dosage/*pharmacokinetics; Durapatite/metabolism; Edetic Acid; Female; Femur/metabolism; Fibula/metabolism; Fluorescent Dyes/diagnostic use; Fluorometry; Humerus/metabolism; Injections, Intravenous; Mandible/metabolism; Models, Animal; Radius/metabolism; Rats; Rats, Nude; Spectrophotometry, Atomic; Tibia/metabolism; Tissue Distribution; Ulna/metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVES: Bisphosphonates commonly used to treat osteoporosis, Paget's disease, multiple myeloma, hypercalcemia of malignancy and osteolytic lesions of cancer metastasis have been associated with bisphosphonate-associated jaw osteonecrosis (BJON). The underlying pathogenesis of BJON is unclear, but disproportionate bisphosphonate concentration in the jaw has been proposed as one potential etiological factor. This study tested the hypothesis that skeletal biodistribution of intravenous bisphosphonate is anatomic site-dependent in a rat model system. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fluorescently labeled pamidronate was injected intravenously in athymic rats of equal weights followed by in vivo whole body fluorimetry, ex vivo optical imaging of oral, axial, and appendicular bones and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid bone decalcification to assess hydroxyapatite-bound bisphosphonate. RESULTS: Bisphosphonate uptake and bisphosphonate released per unit calcium were similar in oral and appendicular bones but lower than those in axial bones. Hydroxyapatite-bound bisphosphonate liberated by sequential acid decalcification was the highest in oral, relative to axial and appendicular bones (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates regional differences in uptake and release of bisphosphonate from oral, axial, and appendicular bones of immune deficient rats.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21122034
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 11
      15. Serial :
        10467
      1. Author :
        Ackermann, M.; Carvajal, I.M.; Morse, B.A.; Moreta, M.; O'Neil, S.; Kossodo, S.; Peterson, J.D.; Delventhal, V.; Marsh, H.N.; Furfine, E.S.; Konerding, M.A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        International Journal of Oncology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        38
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense 680; anti-angiogenic; anti-tumorigenic; Cancer; FMT1 (VisEn); FMT-Solaris; In vivo imaging (VisEn); intraperitoneal injection; mice
      12. Abstract :
        Antiangiogenesis has become a promising pillar in modern cancer therapy. This study investigates the antiangiogenic effects of the PEGylated Adnectin[TM], CT-322, in a murine Colo-205 xenograft tumor model. CT-322 specifically binds to and blocks vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR-2). Adnectins are a novel class of targeted biologics engineered from the 10th domain of human fibronectin. CT-322 treated tumors exhibited a significant reduction in tumor growth of 69%, a 2.8 times lower tumor surface area and fewer necrotic areas. Control tumors showed a 2.36-fold higher microvessel density (MVD) and a 2.42 times higher vessel volume in corrosion casts. The vascular architecture in CT-322-treated tumors was characterized by a strong normalization of vasculature. This was quantified in corrosion casts of CT-322 treated tumors in which the intervascular distance (a reciprocal parameter indicative of vessel density) and the distance between two consecutive branchings were assessed, with these distances being 2.21 times and 2.37 times greater than in controls, respectively. Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) equally affirmed the inhibitory effects of CT-322 on tumor vasculature as indicated by a 60% reduction of the vascular probe, AngioSense, accumulating in tumor tissue, as a measurement of vascular permeability. Moreover, AngioSense accumulation was reduced as early as 24 h after starting treatment. The sum of these effects on tumor vasculature illustrates the anti-angiogenic mechanism underlying the antitumor activity of CT-322 and provides support for further evaluation of this Adnectin in combinatorial strategies with standard of care therapies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21109927
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 8449
      15. Serial :
        4804
      1. Author :
        Ketonis, C.; Barr, S.; Adams, C. S.; Shapiro, I. M.; Parvizi, J.; Hickok, N. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrob Agents Chemother
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        55
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen36, Xen 36, Staphylococcus aureus Xen36, IVIS, Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry/*pharmacology; Bacterial Adhesion/drug effects; Biofilms/drug effects/growth & development; *Bone Transplantation; Bone and Bones/*chemistry/*microbiology; Cell Adhesion/drug effects; Cell Line; Colony Count, Microbial; Humans; Microscopy, Confocal; Osteoblasts/cytology; Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects/*growth & development/physiology; Vancomycin/chemistry/*pharmacology
      12. Abstract :
        Infection is an important medical problem associated with the use of bone allografts. To retard bacterial colonization, we have recently reported on the modification of bone allografts with the antibiotic vancomycin (VAN). In this report, we examine the ability of this antibiotic-modified allograft to resist bacterial colonization and biofilm formation. When antibiotic was coupled to the allograft, a uniform distribution of the antibiotic was apparent. Following challenges with Staphylococcus aureus for 6 h, the covalently bonded VAN decreased colonization as a function of inoculum, ranging from 0.8 to 2.0 log(10) CFU. Furthermore, the VAN-modified surface resisted biofilm formation, even in topographical niches that provide a protected environment for bacterial adhesion. Attachment of the antibiotic to the allograft surface was robust, and the bonded VAN was stable whether incubated in aqueous media or in air, maintaining levels of 75 to 100% of initial levels over 60 days. While the VAN-modified allograft inhibited the Gram-positive S. aureus colonization, in keeping with VAN's spectrum of activity, the VAN-modified allograft was readily colonized by the Gram-negative Escherichia coli. Finally, initial toxicity measures indicated that the VAN-modified allograft did not influence osteoblast colonization or viability. Since the covalently tethered antibiotic is stable, is active, retains its specificity, and does not exhibit toxicity, it is concluded that this modified allograft holds great promise for decreasing bone graft-associated infections.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21098245
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 8
      15. Serial :
        10408
      1. Author :
        Waldner, M. J.; Wirtz, S.; Jefremow, A.; Warntjen, M.; Neufert, C.; Atreya, R.; Becker, C.; Weigmann, B.; Vieth, M.; Rose-John, S.; Neurath, M. F.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        J Exp Med
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        207
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Blotting, Western; Cell Proliferation/drug effects; Cells, Cultured; Colitis/chemically induced/complications; Colonic Neoplasms/etiology/genetics/*metabolism; Dextran Sulfate; Endothelial Cells/metabolism; Epithelial Cells/metabolism; Gene Expression; Humans; Immunohistochemistry; Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/genetics/*metabolism; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; Mice, Transgenic; Microscopy, Confocal; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction; STAT3 Transcription Factor/genetics/metabolism; *Signal Transduction; Up-Regulation; Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/genetics/metabolism/pharmacology; Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-1/genetics/metabolism; Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2/genetics/*metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        Whereas the inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has shown promising results in sporadic colon cancer, the role of VEGF signaling in colitis-associated cancer (CAC) has not been addressed. We found that, unlike sporadic colorectal cancer and control patients, patients with CAC show activated VEGFR2 on intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). We then explored the function of VEGFR2 in a murine model of colitis-associated colon cancer characterized by increased VEGFR2 expression. Epithelial cells in tumor tissue expressed VEGFR2 and responded to VEGF stimulation with augmented VEGFR2-mediated proliferation. Blockade of VEGF function via soluble decoy receptors suppressed tumor development, inhibited tumor angiogenesis, and blocked tumor cell proliferation. Functional studies revealed that chronic inflammation leads to an up-regulation of VEGFR2 on IECs. Studies in conditional STAT3 mutant mice showed that VEGFR signaling requires STAT3 to promote epithelial cell proliferation and tumor growth in vivo. Thus, VEGFR-signaling acts as a direct growth factor for tumor cells in CAC, providing a molecular link between inflammation and the development of colon cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21098094
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 34
      15. Serial :
        10385
      1. Author :
        Goergen, C.J.; Azuma, J.; Barr, K.N.; Magdefessel, L.; Kallop, D.Y.; Gogineni, A.; Grewall, A.; Weimer, R.M.; Connolly, A.J.; Dalman, R.L.; Taylor, C.A.; Tsao, P.S.; Greve, J.M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        31
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aaa; abdominal aortic aneurysm; FX Pro Kodak molecular Imaging System; ImageJ software; in vivo imaging; jugular vein injection; mice; MMPSense 680; ProSense 750; tail vein injection; thoracic aorta; vascular
      12. Abstract :
        <AbstractText Label=“OBJECTIVE” NlmCategory=“OBJECTIVE”>To quantitatively compare aortic curvature and motion with resulting aneurysm location, direction of expansion, and pathophysiological features in experimental abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs).</AbstractText> <AbstractText Label=“METHODS AND RESULTS” NlmCategory=“RESULTS”>MRI was performed at 4.7 T with the following parameters: (1) 3D acquisition for vessel geometry and (2) 2D cardiac-gated acquisition to quantify luminal motion. Male 24-week-old mice were imaged before and after AAA formation induced by angiotensin II (AngII)-filled osmotic pump implantation or infusion of elastase. AngII-induced AAAs formed near the location of maximum abdominal aortic curvature, and the leftward direction of expansion was correlated with the direction of suprarenal aortic motion. Elastase-induced AAAs formed in a region of low vessel curvature and had no repeatable direction of expansion. AngII significantly increased mean blood pressure (22.7 mm Hg, P<0.05), whereas both models showed a significant 2-fold decrease in aortic cyclic strain (P<0.05). Differences in patterns of elastin degradation and localization of fluorescent signal from protease-activated probes were also observed.</AbstractText> <AbstractText Label=“CONCLUSIONS” NlmCategory=“CONCLUSIONS”>The direction of AngII aneurysm expansion correlated with the direction of motion, medial elastin dissection, and adventitial remodeling. Anterior infrarenal aortic motion correlated with medial elastin degradation in elastase-induced aneurysms. Results from both models suggest a relationship between aneurysm pathological features and aortic geometry and motion.</AbstractText>
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21071686
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 8450
      15. Serial :
        4803
      1. Author :
        Ketonis, C.; Barr, S.; Shapiro, I. M.; Parvizi, J.; Adams, C. S.; Hickok, N. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Bone
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        48
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen36, Xen 36, Staphylococcus aureus Xen36, IVIS, Adsorption/drug effects; Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry/*pharmacology; Biological Markers/metabolism; *Bone Transplantation; Cell Differentiation/drug effects; Cell Shape/drug effects; Cells, Cultured; Colony Count, Microbial; Drug Stability; Fetus/cytology; Fluorescence; Gene Expression Profiling; Humans; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Osteoblasts/cytology/drug effects/metabolism; Phenotype; Time Factors; Transplantation, Homologous; Vancomycin/chemistry/*pharmacology
      12. Abstract :
        Bacterial contamination of bone allograft is a significant complication of orthopedic surgery. To address this issue, we have engineered a method for covalently modifying bone allograft tissue with the antibiotic vancomycin. The goal of this investigation was to compare the biocidal properties of this new allograft material with those of vancomycin physisorbed onto graft material. The duration of antibiotic release from the vancomycin-modified allograft matrix was determined, and no elution was observed. In contrast, the adsorbed antibiotic showed a peak elution at 24h that then decreased over several days. We next used an Staphylococcus aureus disk diffusion assay to measure the activity of the eluted vancomycin. Again we found that no active antibiotic was eluted from the covalently modified allograft. Similarly, when the vancomycin-modified allograft morsel was used in the assay, no measurable elution was observed; amounts of antibiotic released from the adsorbed samples inhibited S. aureus growth for 4-7 days. Probably the most telling property of the allograft was that after 2 weeks, the tethered allograft was able to resist bacterial colonization. Unlike the elution system in which vancomycin was depleted over the course of days-weeks, the antibiotic on the allograft was stably bound even after 300 days, while its biocidal activity remained undiminished for 60 days. This finding was in stark contrast to the antibiotic impregnated allograft, which was readily colonized by bacteria. Finally we chose to evaluate three indicators of cell function: expression of a key transcription factor, expression of selected transcripts, and assessment of cell morphology. Since the tethered antibiotic appeared to have little or no effect on any of these activities, it was concluded that the stable, tethered antibiotic prevented bacterial infection while not modifying bone cell function.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21035576
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 7
      15. Serial :
        10407
      1. Author :
        Brand, A. M.; de Kwaadsteniet, M.; Dicks, L. M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Lett Appl Microbiol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        51
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen36, Xen 36, Staphylococcus aureus Xen36, IVIS, Animals; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Nisin/*pharmacology; Peritoneal Cavity/*microbiology; Staphylococcal Infections/*prevention & control; Staphylococcus aureus/*drug effects/growth & development
      12. Abstract :
        AIMS: To determine the ability of nisin F to control systematic infection caused by Staphylococcus aureus, using C57BL/6 mice as a model. METHODS AND RESULTS: Twelve mice were intraperitoneally injected with 1 x 10(8) viable cells of Staph. aureus Xen 36 containing the modified Photorhabdus luminescence luxABCDE operon on plasmid pAUL-A Tn4001. After 4 h, six mice were intraperitoneally injected with 640 arbitrary units (AU) nisin F, and six were injected with sterile saline. Six mice, not infected with Staph. aureus, were treated with nisin F, and six not infected were left untreated. The viability of Staph. aureus Xen 36 was monitored over 48 h by recording photon emission levels. Nisin F suppressed Staph. aureus for 15 min in vivo. No abnormalities were recorded in blood analyses and internal organs of mice treated with nisin F. CONCLUSIONS: Nisin F suppressed the growth of Staph. aureus in the peritoneal cavity for at least 15 min. Re-emergence of Staph. aureus bioluminescence over the next 44 h suggests that nisin F was inactivated, most probably by proteolytic enzymes. SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY: A single dosage of nisin F administered in the peritoneal cavity controlled the growth of Staph. aureus for at least 15 min in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21029139
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10410
      1. Author :
        Mumprecht, V.; Honer, M.; Vigl, B.; Proulx, S. T.; Trachsel, E.; Kaspar, M.; Banziger-Tobler, N. E.; Schibli, R.; Neri, D.; Detmar, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        70
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals, B16-F10-luc2, B16F10-luc2; Antibodies, Monoclonal/diagnostic use/immunology; *Diagnostic Imaging; Female; Fluorodeoxyglucose F18/diagnostic use; Glycoproteins/*immunology; Humans; Inflammation/*complications/immunology/pathology; Iodine Radioisotopes/diagnostic use/pharmacokinetics; Luminescent Measurements; Lymph Nodes/immunology/pathology/*radionuclide imaging; *Lymphangiogenesis; Lymphatic Metastasis; Melanoma, Experimental/*complications/immunology/pathology; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Transgenic; *Positron-Emission Tomography; Prognosis; Radiopharmaceuticals/diagnostic use; Skin/metabolism; Tissue Distribution; Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor C/metabolism; Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-3/immunology
      12. Abstract :
        Metastasis to regional lymph nodes (LN) is a prognostic indicator for cancer progression. There is a great demand for sensitive and noninvasive methods to detect metastasis to LNs. Whereas conventional in vivo imaging approaches have focused on the detection of cancer cells, lymphangiogenesis within tumor-draining LNs might be the earliest sign of metastasis. In mouse models of LN lymphangiogenesis, we found that systemically injected antibodies to lymphatic epitopes accumulated in the lymphatic vasculature in tissues and LNs. Using a (124)I-labeled antibody against the lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor-1 (LYVE-1), we imaged, for the first time, inflammation- and tumor-draining LNs with expanded lymphatic networks in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET). Anti-LYVE-1 immuno-PET enabled visualization of lymphatic vessel expansion in LNs bearing metastases that were not detected by [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, which is clinically applied to detect cancer metastases. Immuno-PET with lymphatic-specific antibodies may open up new avenues for the early detection of metastasis, and the images obtained might be used as biomarkers for the progression of diseases associated with lymphangiogenesis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20978206
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10349