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      1. Author :
        Thomas Christen, Matthias Nahrendorf, Moritz Wildgruber, Filip K. Swirski, Elena Aikawa, Peter Waterman, Koichi Shimizu, Ralph Weissleder and Peter Libby
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Circulation
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        119
      8. Issue :
        14
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        In vivo imaging; inflammation; leukocytes; rejection; transplantation; fluorescence molecular tomography; FMT; Prosense
      12. Abstract :
        Background: Clinical detection of transplant rejection by repeated endomyocardial biopsy requires catheterization and entails risks. Recently developed molecular and cellular imaging techniques that visualize macrophage host responses could provide a noninvasive alternative. Yet, which macrophage functions may provide useful markers for detecting parenchymal rejection remains uncertain.

        Methods and Results: We transplanted isografts from B6 mice and allografts from Balb/c mice heterotopically into B6 recipients. In this allograft across major histocompatability barriers, the transplanted heart undergoes predictable progressive rejection, leading to graft failure after 1 week. During rejection, crucial macrophage functions, including phagocytosis and release of proteases, render these abundant innate immune cells attractive imaging targets. Two or 6 days after transplantation, we injected either a fluorescent protease sensor or a magnetofluorescent phagocytosis marker. Histological and flow cytometric analyses established that macrophages function as the major cellular signal source. In vivo, we obtained a 3-dimensional functional map of macrophages showing higher phagocytic uptake of magnetofluorescent nanoparticles during rejection using magnetic resonance imaging and higher protease activity in allografts than in isografts using tomographic fluorescence. We further assessed the sensitivity of imaging to detect the degree of rejection. In vivo imaging of macrophage response correlated closely with gradually increasing allograft rejection and attenuated rejection in recipients with a genetically impaired immune response resulting from a deficiency in recombinase-1 (RAG-1-/-).

        Conclusions: Molecular imaging reporters of either phagocytosis or protease activity can detect cardiac allograft rejection noninvasively, promise to enhance the search for novel tolerance-inducing strategies, and have translational potential.
      13. URL :
        http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/circulationaha;119/14/1925
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4640
      1. Author :
        Singh, Abhinav; Massoud, Tarik F; Deroose, Christophe; Gambhir, Sanjiv S
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Seminars in nuclear medicine
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        38
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Bioware; Diagnostic Imaging; Genes, Reporter; Humans; Male; Molecular Probe Techniques; Neoplasm Proteins; PC-3M-luc; Prostatic Neoplasms; Tumor Markers, Biological
      12. Abstract :
        Prostate cancer remains an important and growing health problem. Advances in imaging of prostate cancer may help to achieve earlier and more accurate diagnosis and treatment. We review the various strategies using reporter genes for molecular imaging of prostate cancer. These approaches are emerging as valuable tools for monitoring gene expression in laboratory animals and humans. Further development of more sensitive and selective reporters, combined with improvements in detection technology, will consolidate the position of reporter gene imaging as a versatile method for understanding of intracellular biological processes and the underlying molecular basis of prostate cancer, as well as potentially establishing a future role in the clinical management of patients afflicted with this disease.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18096460
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8966
      1. Author :
        Yu, Jun; Wu, Jenny; Francis, Kevin P; Purchio, Tony F; Kadurugamuwa, Jagath L
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        The Journal of antimicrobial chemotherapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        55
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Biofilms; Bioware; Drug Resistance, Bacterial; Mice; Mutation; Rifampin; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVES To investigate in vivo fitness of rifampicin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus mutants in a mouse biofilm model using bioluminescence imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS S. aureus was engineered with a luciferase operon to emit bioluminescence that can be detected in vivo using an IVIS imaging system. Two rifampicin-resistant strains of S. aureus that were previously isolated from animals undergoing rifampicin treatment, S464P (resistant to low concentrations of rifampicin) and H481Y (resistant to high concentrations of rifampicin), were characterized and then compared with their parental strain for in vivo fitness to form biofilm infections in the absence of rifampicin. RESULTS The mutant S464P showed better adaptation to in vivo growth than either the parental strain or H481Y without selective pressure. Six days after implanting pre-colonized catheters, bioluminescent signals were seen from 100% of the catheters coated by the mutant S464P. In comparison, only 83% and 61% of the catheters coated by the parental strain and H481Y, respectively, maintained a signal in vivo. Rifampicin treatment of S464P biofilms in vivo resulted in a slight decline, but earlier rebound in bioluminescence from these catheters compared with the parental signal, whereas rifampicin had no affect on bioluminescence in mice infected with mutant H481Y. CONCLUSIONS The mutant with low-level rifampicin resistance appears to be better adapted to in vivo growth than the mutant that has high-level rifampicin resistance. Moreover, the former mutant may actually have a slight competitive advantage over the rifampicin-susceptible strain (parental), raising awareness for the occurrence of such strains in clinical environments.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15743898
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9055
      1. Author :
        Lim, E.; Modi, K.; Christensen, A.; Meganck, J.; Oldfield, S.; Zhang, N.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Vis Exp
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-D3H2Ln, IVIS, Bioluminescence, Animals; Bone Neoplasms/*secondary; Breast Neoplasms/*pathology; Cell Line, Tumor; Female; Humans; Luminescent Measurements/*methods; Mice; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Metastasis; Neoplasm Transplantation; Tomography, X-Ray Computed/*methods; Transplantation, Heterologous
      12. Abstract :
        Following intracardiac delivery of MDA-MB-231-luc-D3H2LN cells to Nu/Nu mice, systemic metastases developed in the injected animals. Bioluminescence imaging using IVIS Spectrum was employed to monitor the distribution and development of the tumor cells following the delivery procedure including DLIT reconstruction to measure the tumor signal and its location. Development of metastatic lesions to the bone tissues triggers osteolytic activity and lesions to tibia and femur were evaluated longitudinally using micro CT. Imaging was performed using a Quantum FX micro CT system with fast imaging and low X-ray dose. The low radiation dose allows multiple imaging sessions to be performed with a cumulative X-ray dosage far below LD50. A mouse imaging shuttle device was used to sequentially image the mice with both IVIS Spectrum and Quantum FX achieving accurate animal positioning in both the bioluminescence and CT images. The optical and CT data sets were co-registered in 3-dimentions using the Living Image 4.1 software. This multi-mode approach allows close monitoring of tumor growth and development simultaneously with osteolytic activity.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21525842
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 5
      15. Serial :
        10416
      1. Author :
        Wang, J.; Barke, R. A.; Charboneau, R.; Schwendener, R.; Roy, S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        J Immunol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        180
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals, Cell Line, Cell Line, Transformed, Humans, Macrophages, Alveolar/*drug effects/immunology/*microbiology/pathology, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Morphine/administration & dosage/*therapeutic use, NF-kappa B/*antagonists & inhibitors/physiology, Neutrophil Infiltration/drug effects/immunology, Pneumonia, Pneumococcal/*drug therapy/*immunology/microbiology/mortality, Signal Transduction/*drug effects/immunology, Streptococcus pneumoniae/drug effects/*immunology, Time Factors, Toll-Like Receptor 2/physiology, Toll-Like Receptor 4/physiology, Toll-Like Receptor 9/*antagonists & inhibitors/physiology IVIS, Xenogen, Xen10
      12. Abstract :
        Resident alveolar macrophages and respiratory epithelium constitutes the first line of defense against invading lung pneumococci. Results from our study showed that increased mortality and bacterial outgrowth and dissemination seen in morphine-treated mice were further exaggerated following depletion of alveolar macrophages with liposomal clodronate. Using an in vitro alveolar macrophages and lung epithelial cells infection model, we show significant release of MIP-2 from alveolar macrophages, but not from lung epithelial cells, following 4 h of exposure of cells to pneumococci infection. Morphine treatment reduced MIP-2 release in pneumococci stimulated alveolar macrophages. Furthermore, morphine treatment inhibited Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced NF-kappaB-dependent gene transcription in alveolar macrophages following 2 h of in vitro infection. S. pneumoniae infection resulted in a significant induction of NF-kappaB activity only in TLR9 stably transfected HEK 293 cells, but not in TLR2 and TLR4 transfected HEK 293 cells, and morphine treatment inhibited S. pneumoniae-induced NF-kappaB activity in these cells. Moreover, morphine treatment also decreased bacterial uptake and killing in alveolar macrophages. Taken together, these results suggest that morphine treatment impairs TLR9-NF-kappaB signaling and diminishes bacterial clearance following S. pneumoniae infection in resident macrophages during the early stages of infection, leading to a compromised innate immune response.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=18292587
      14. Call Number :
        144073
      15. Serial :
        6976
      1. Author :
        Pribaz, J. R.; Bernthal, N. M.; Billi, F.; Cho, J. S.; Ramos, R. I.; Guo, Y.; Cheung, A. L.; Francis, K. P.; Miller, L. S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Journal of orthopaedic research : official publication of the Orthopaedic Research Society
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        N/A
      12. Abstract :
        Post-arthroplasty infections are a devastating problem in orthopaedic surgery. While acute infections can be treated with a single stage washout and liner exchange, chronic infections lead to multiple reoperations, prolonged antibiotic courses, extended disability, and worse clinical outcomes. Unlike previous mouse models that studied an acute infection, this work aimed to develop a model of a chronic post-arthroplasty infection. To achieve this, a stainless steel implant in the knee joints of mice was inoculated with a bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus strain (1 x 10(2) -1 x 10(4) colony forming units, CFUs) and in vivo imaging was used to monitor the bacterial burden for 42 days. Four different S. aureus strains were compared in which the bioluminescent construct was integrated in an antibiotic selection plasmid (ALC2906), the bacterial chromosome (Xen29 and Xen40), or a stable plasmid (Xen36). ALC2906 had increased bioluminescent signals through day 10, after which the signals became undetectable. In contrast, Xen29, Xen40, and Xen36 had increased bioluminescent signals through 42 days with the highest signals observed with Xen36. ALC2906, Xen29, and Xen40 induced significantly more inflammation than Xen36 as measured by in vivo enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP)-neutrophil flourescence of LysEGFP mice. All four strains induced comparable biofilm formation as determined by variable-pressure scanning electron microscopy. Using a titanium implant, Xen36 had higher in vivo bioluminescence signals than Xen40 but had similar biofilm formation and adherent bacteria. In conclusion, Xen29, Xen40, and especially Xen36, which had stable bioluminescent constructs, are feasible for long-term in vivo monitoring of bacterial burden and biofilm formation to study chronic post-arthroplasty infections and potential antimicrobial interventions. (c) 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21837686
      14. Call Number :
        142237
      15. Serial :
        6983
      1. Author :
        Hu, Guohong; Chong, Robert A; Yang, Qifeng; Wei, Yong; Blanco, Mario A; Li, Feng; Reiss, Michael; Au, Jessie L-S; Haffty, Bruce G; Kang, Yibin
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Cancer cell
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        15
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aldehyde Dehydrogenase; Animals; Bioware; Breast Neoplasms; Cell Adhesion Molecules; Cell Line, Tumor; Chromosomes, Human, Pair 8; Drug Resistance, Neoplasm; Gene Expression Profiling; Genome, Human; Humans; MDA-MB-231-D3H2LN cells; Mice; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Metastasis; Neoplasm Recurrence, Local; Prognosis; Proto-Oncogene Proteins; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-met; Receptors, Growth Factor; Survival Rate; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Targeted therapy for metastatic diseases relies on the identification of functionally important metastasis genes from a large number of random genetic alterations. Here we use a computational algorithm to map minimal recurrent genomic alterations associated with poor-prognosis breast cancer. 8q22 genomic gain was identified by this approach and validated in an extensive collection of breast tumor samples. Regional gain of 8q22 elevates expression of the metastasis gene metadherin (MTDH), which is overexpressed in more than 40% of breast cancers and is associated with poor clinical outcomes. Functional characterization of MTDH revealed its dual role in promoting metastatic seeding and enhancing chemoresistance. These findings establish MTDH as an important therapeutic target for simultaneously enhancing chemotherapy efficacy and reducing metastasis risk.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19111877
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8957
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