1. Resources
  2. Citations Library

Citation Details

You are viewing citation details. You can save or export citation(s) below, access an article, or start a new search.

491–499 of 499 records found matching your query:
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All

Headers act as filters

  •  
  • Records
      1. Author :
        Waldner, M. J.; Wirtz, S.; Jefremow, A.; Warntjen, M.; Neufert, C.; Atreya, R.; Becker, C.; Weigmann, B.; Vieth, M.; Rose-John, S.; Neurath, M. F.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        J Exp Med
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        207
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Blotting, Western; Cell Proliferation/drug effects; Cells, Cultured; Colitis/chemically induced/complications; Colonic Neoplasms/etiology/genetics/*metabolism; Dextran Sulfate; Endothelial Cells/metabolism; Epithelial Cells/metabolism; Gene Expression; Humans; Immunohistochemistry; Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/genetics/*metabolism; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; Mice, Transgenic; Microscopy, Confocal; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction; STAT3 Transcription Factor/genetics/metabolism; *Signal Transduction; Up-Regulation; Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/genetics/metabolism/pharmacology; Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-1/genetics/metabolism; Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2/genetics/*metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        Whereas the inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has shown promising results in sporadic colon cancer, the role of VEGF signaling in colitis-associated cancer (CAC) has not been addressed. We found that, unlike sporadic colorectal cancer and control patients, patients with CAC show activated VEGFR2 on intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). We then explored the function of VEGFR2 in a murine model of colitis-associated colon cancer characterized by increased VEGFR2 expression. Epithelial cells in tumor tissue expressed VEGFR2 and responded to VEGF stimulation with augmented VEGFR2-mediated proliferation. Blockade of VEGF function via soluble decoy receptors suppressed tumor development, inhibited tumor angiogenesis, and blocked tumor cell proliferation. Functional studies revealed that chronic inflammation leads to an up-regulation of VEGFR2 on IECs. Studies in conditional STAT3 mutant mice showed that VEGFR signaling requires STAT3 to promote epithelial cell proliferation and tumor growth in vivo. Thus, VEGFR-signaling acts as a direct growth factor for tumor cells in CAC, providing a molecular link between inflammation and the development of colon cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21098094
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 34
      15. Serial :
        10385
      1. Author :
        Hertlein, T.; Sturm, V.; Kircher, S.; Basse-Lusebrink, T.; Haddad, D.; Ohlsen, K.; Jakob, P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xen29, Xen 29, Staphylococcus aureus Xen29, Animals; Female; Magnetic Resonance Imaging/*methods; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Staphylococcal Infections/*pathology; Staphylococcus aureus/*pathogenicity; Thigh/*microbiology/*pathology
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: During the last years, (19)F-MRI and perfluorocarbon nanoemulsion (PFC) emerged as a powerful contrast agent based MRI methodology to track cells and to visualize inflammation. We applied this new modality to visualize deep tissue abscesses during acute and chronic phase of inflammation caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, a murine thigh infection model was used to induce abscess formation and PFC or CLIO (cross linked ironoxides) was administered during acute or chronic phase of inflammation. 24 h after inoculation, the contrast agent accumulation was imaged at the site of infection by MRI. Measurements revealed a strong accumulation of PFC at the abscess rim at acute and chronic phase of infection. The pattern was similar to CLIO accumulation at chronic phase and formed a hollow sphere around the edema area. Histology revealed strong influx of neutrophils at the site of infection and to a smaller extend macrophages during acute phase and strong influx of macrophages at chronic phase of inflammation. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: We introduce (19)F-MRI in combination with PFC nanoemulsions as a new platform to visualize abscess formation in a murine thigh infection model of S. aureus. The possibility to track immune cells in vivo by this modality offers new opportunities to investigate host immune response, the efficacy of antibacterial therapies and the influence of virulence factors for pathogenesis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21455319
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10451
      1. Author :
        Hjortnaes, J.; New, S. E.; Aikawa, E.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2013
      5. Publication :
        Trends Cardiovasc Med
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense
      12. Abstract :
        Cardiovascular calcification is currently viewed as an active disease process similar to embryonic bone formation. Cardiovascular calcification mainly affects the aortic valve and arteries and is associated with increased mortality risk. Aortic valve and arterial calcification share similar risk factors, including age, gender, diabetes, chronic renal disease, and smoking. However, the exact cellular and molecular mechanism of cardiovascular calcification is unknown. Late-stage cardiovascular calcification can be visualized with conventional imaging modalities such as echocardiography and computed tomography. However, these modalities are limited in their ability to detect the development of early calcification and the progression of calcification until advanced tissue mineralization is apparent. Due to the subsequent late diagnosis of cardiovascular calcification, treatment is usually comprised of invasive interventions such as surgery. The need to understand the process of calcification is therefore warranted and requires new imaging modalities which are able to visualize early cardiovascular calcification. This review focuses on the use of new imaging techniques to visualize novel concepts of cardiovascular calcification.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23290463
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 8
      15. Serial :
        10470
      1. Author :
        Francis, K P; Yu, J; Bellinger-Kawahara, C; Joh, D; Hawkinson, M J; Xiao, G; Purchio, T F; Caparon, M G; Lipsitch, M; Contag, P R
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2001
      5. Publication :
        Infection and immunity
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        69
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Amoxicillin; Animals; Bioware; DNA Transposable Elements; Female; Luminescent Measurements; Lung; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Nasopharynx; Operon; Promoter Regions, Genetic; pXen-5; Streptococcus pneumoniae; Transformation, Bacterial, Xen10, Xen7
      12. Abstract :
        Animal studies with Streptococcus pneumoniae have provided valuable models for drug development. In order to monitor long-term pneumococcal infections noninvasively in living mice, a novel gram-positive lux transposon cassette, Tn4001 luxABCDE Km(r), that allows random integration of lux genes onto the bacterial chromosome was constructed. The cassette was designed so that the luxABCDE and kanamycin resistance genes were linked to form a single promoterless operon. Bioluminescence and kanamycin resistance only occur in a bacterial cell if this operon has transposed downstream of a promoter on the bacterium's chromosome. S. pneumoniae D39 was transformed with plasmid pAUL-A Tn4001 luxABCDE Km(r), and a number of highly bioluminescent colonies were recovered. Genomic DNA from the brightest D39 strain was used to transform a number of clinical S. pneumoniae isolates, and several of these strains were tested in animal models, including a pneumococcal lung infection model. Strong bioluminescent signals were seen in the lungs of the animals containing these pneumococci, allowing the course and antibiotic treatment of the infections to be readily monitored in real time in the living animals. Recovery of the bacteria from the animals showed that the bioluminescent signal corresponded to the number of CFU and that the lux construct was highly stable even after several days in vivo. We believe that this lux transposon will greatly expand the ability to evaluate drug efficacy against gram-positive bacteria in living animals using bioluminescence.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11292758
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9027
      1. Author :
        Stan, Silvia D; Hahm, Eun-Ryeong; Warin, Renaud; Singh, Shivendra V
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Cancer research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        68
      8. Issue :
        18
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; Apoptosis; Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins; Bioware; Breast Neoplasms; Cell Growth Processes; Cell Line, Tumor; Ergosterol; Female; Forkhead Transcription Factors; Humans; MDA-MB-231-D3H1 cells; Membrane Proteins; Mice; Mice, Nude; Proto-Oncogene Proteins; RNA, Small Interfering; Transfection; Withanolides; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Withaferin A (WA) is derived from the medicinal plant Withania somnifera, which has been safely used for centuries in Indian Ayurvedic medicine for treatment of different ailments. We now show, for the first time, that WA exhibits significant activity against human breast cancer cells in culture and in vivo. The WA treatment decreased viability of MCF-7 (estrogen-responsive) and MDA-MB-231 (estrogen-independent) human breast cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The WA-mediated suppression of breast cancer cell viability correlated with apoptosis induction characterized by DNA condensation, cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation, and cleavage of poly-(ADP-ribose)-polymerase. On the other hand, a spontaneously immortalized normal mammary epithelial cell line (MCF-10A) was relatively more resistant to WA-induced apoptosis compared with breast cancer cells. The WA-mediated apoptosis was accompanied by induction of Bim-s and Bim-L in MCF-7 cells and induction of Bim-s and Bim-EL isoforms in MDA-MB-231 cells. The cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation resulting from WA exposure was significantly attenuated by knockdown of protein levels of Bim and its transcriptional regulator FOXO3a in both cell lines. Moreover, FOXO3a knockdown conferred marked protection against WA-mediated induction of Bim-s expression. The growth of MDA-MB-231 cells implanted in female nude mice was significantly retarded by 5 weekly i.p. injections of 4 mg WA/kg body weight. The tumors from WA-treated mice exhibited reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptosis compared with tumors from control mice. These results point toward an important role of FOXO3a and Bim in regulation of WA-mediated apoptosis in human breast cancer cells.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18794155
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8990
      1. Author :
        Sehrawat, A.; Arlotti, J. A.; Murakami, A.; Singh, S. V.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Breast Cancer Res Treat
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        136
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-D3H1, MDA-MB-231-luc-D3H1, IVIS, Bioware, Breast Cancer
      12. Abstract :
        The present study was undertaken to determine the anticancer efficacy of zerumbone (ZER), a sesquiterpene from subtropical ginger, against human breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. ZER treatment caused a dose-dependent decrease in viability of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells in association with G(2)/M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction. ZER-mediated cell cycle arrest was associated with downregulation of cyclin B1, cyclin-dependent kinase 1, Cdc25C, and Cdc25B. Even though ZER treatment caused stabilization of p53 and induction of PUMA, these proteins were dispensable for ZER-induced cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis. Exposure of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells to ZER resulted in downregulation of Bcl-2 but its ectopic expression failed to confer protection against ZER-induced apoptosis. On the other hand, the SV40 immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from Bax and Bak double knockout mice were significantly more resistant to ZER-induced apoptosis. ZER-treated MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells exhibited a robust activation of both Bax and Bak. In vivo growth of orthotopic MDA-MB-231 xenografts was significantly retarded by ZER administration in association with apoptosis induction and suppression of cell proliferation (Ki-67 expression). These results indicate that ZER causes G(2)/M phase cell cycle arrest and Bax/Bak-mediated apoptosis in human breast cancer cells, and retards growth of MDA-MB-231 xenografts in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23053663
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 5
      15. Serial :
        10518
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Angiogenesis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        13
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        angiogenesis imaging; in vivo imaging; Angiogenesis; Bioluminescence; Fluorescence; Molecular imaging; Optical imaging
      12. Abstract :
        In recent years, molecular imaging gained significant importance in biomedical research. Optical imaging developed into a modality which enables the visualization and quantification of all kinds of cellular processes and cancerous cell growth in small animals. Novel gene reporter mice and cell lines and the development of targeted and cleavable fluorescent “smart” probes form a powerful imaging toolbox. The development of systems collecting tomographic bioluminescence and fluorescence data enabled even more spatial accuracy and more quantitative measurements. Here we describe various bioluminescent and fluorescent gene reporter models and probes that can be used to specifically image and quantify neovascularization or the angiogenic process itself.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2911541/
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4488
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All