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      1. Author :
        Mann, B.; Orihuela, C.; Antikainen, J.; Gao, G.; Sublett, J.; Korhonen, T. K.; Tuomanen, E.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2006
      5. Publication :
        Infection and Immunity
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        74
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen, Xen7
      12. Abstract :
        Members of the choline binding protein (Cbp) family are noncovalently bound to phosphorylcholine residues on the surface of Streptococcus pneumoniae. It has been suggested that CbpG plays a role in adherence and increase virulence both at the mucosal surface and in the bloodstream, but the function of this protein has been unclear. A new sequence analysis indicated that CbpG is a possible member of the S1 family of multifunctional surface-associated serine proteases. Clinical isolates contained two alleles of cbpG, and one-third of the strains expressed a truncated protein lacking the C-terminal, cell wall-anchoring choline binding domain. CbpG on the surface of pneumococci (full length) or released into the supernatant (truncated) showed proteolytic activity for fibronectin and casein, as did CbpG expressed on lactobacilli or as a purified full-length or truncated recombinant protein. Recombinant CbpG (rCbpG)-coated beads adhered to eukaryotic cells, and TIGR4 mutants lacking CbpG or having a truncated CbpG protein showed decreased adherence in vitro and attenuation of disease in mouse challenge models of colonization, pneumonia, and bacteremia. Immunization with rCbpG was protective in an animal model of colonization and sepsis. We propose that CbpG is a multifunctional surface protein that in the cell-attached or secreted form cleaves host extracellular matrix and in the cell-attached form participates in bacterial adherence. This is the first example of distinct functions in virulence that are dependent on natural variation in expression of a choline binding domain.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16428724
      14. Call Number :
        140887
      15. Serial :
        6992
      1. Author :
        Jason R. McCarthy, Purvish Patel, Ion Botnaru, Pouneh Haghayeghi, Ralph Weissleder and Farouc A. Jaffer
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Bioconjugate Chemistry
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        20
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        In vivo imaging; thrombi; VivoTag
      12. Abstract :
        Thrombosis underlies numerous life-threatening cardiovascular syndromes. Development of thrombosis-specific molecular imaging agents to detect and monitor thrombogenesis and fibrinolysis in vivo could improve the diagnosis, risk stratification, and treatment of thrombosis syndromes. To this end, we have synthesized efficient multimodal nanoagents targeted to two different constituents of thrombi, namely, fibrin and activated factor XIII. These agents are targeted via the conjugation of peptide-targeting ligands to the surface of fluorescently labeled magnetic nanoparticles. As demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo studies, both nanoagents possess high affinities for thrombi, and enable mutimodal fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19456115
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4647
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Circulation
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        119
      8. Issue :
        20
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        In vivo imaging; MMPSense
      12. Abstract :
        An extract of the first 250 words of the full text is provided, because this article has no abstract:

        Formation of unstable atherosclerotic plaque in the internal carotid artery carries a high risk for emboli and subsequent cerebral ischemic events. The fibrous cap of such a plaque may become thin and rupture as a result of the depletion of matrix components through the activation of proteolytic enzymes such as matrix-degrading proteinases. Enhanced matrix breakdown has been attributed primarily to a family of matrix-degrading metalloproteinases (MMPs) that are highly concentrated in atherosclerotic plaques by inflammatory cells (eg, macrophages, foam cells), smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells.

        Elevated serum MMP-9 concentration is associated with carotid plaque instability and the presence of infiltrated macrophages. Furthermore, analysis of the presence of MMP-9 protein by ELISA within excised carotid plaques revealed high MMP-9 protein mass in calcified segments at or near the carotid bifurcation and in segments with intraplaque hemorrhage. Gelatin zymography showed an increased gelatinase activity of MMP-9 in these segments. These data favor the important role of MMP-9 in the pathogenesis of plaque instability. We analyzed the topographic distribution of MMPs within an excised human carotid plaque by applying multispectral near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging (IVIS Spectrum, Caliper Life Sciences, Hopkinton, Mass).

        A surgical endarterectomy was performed on a 74-year-old women with a left-sided, symptomatic, >70% carotid stenosis. Immediately after endarterectomy, the plaque was placed in PBS and transported to the NIRF system. The plaque was then stretched out and fixed on a silicon plate with 25G needles. A PBS NIRF image was generated from both the intraluminal and extraluminal side of the . . .
      13. URL :
        http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/extract/119/20/e534
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4644
      1. Author :
        Brandl, K.; Plitas, G.; Schnabl, B.; DeMatteo, R. P.; Pamer, E. G.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        J Exp Med
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        204
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals, Bone Marrow Cells/metabolism/microbiology, Gene Expression Regulation, Intestines/metabolism, Kinetics, Lectins/chemistry, Listeria Infections/*metabolism/*prevention & control, Listeria monocytogenes/*metabolism, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88/metabolism/*physiology, Proteins/*metabolism, Recombinant Proteins/metabolism, Toll-Like Receptors/metabolism IVIS, Xenogen, Xen32
      12. Abstract :
        Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne bacterial pathogen that causes systemic infection by traversing the intestinal mucosa. Although MyD88-mediated signals are essential for defense against systemic L. monocytogenes infection, the role of Toll-like receptor and MyD88 signaling in intestinal immunity against this pathogen has not been defined. We show that clearance of L. monocytogenes from the lumen of the distal small intestine is impaired in MyD88(-/-) mice. The distal ileum of wild-type (wt) mice expresses high levels of RegIII gamma, which is a bactericidal lectin that is secreted into the bowel lumen, whereas RegIII gamma expression in MyD88(-/-) mice is nearly undetectable. In vivo depletion of RegIII gamma from the small intestine of wt mice diminishes killing of luminal L. monocytogenes, whereas reconstitution of MyD88-deficient mice with recombinant RegIII gamma enhances intestinal bacterial clearance. Experiments with bone marrow chimeric mice reveal that MyD88-mediated signals in nonhematopoietic cells induce RegIII gamma expression in the small intestine, thereby enhancing bacterial killing. Our findings support a model of MyD88-mediated epithelial conditioning that protects the intestinal mucosa against bacterial invasion by inducing RegIII gamma.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=17635956
      14. Call Number :
        136402
      15. Serial :
        7029
      1. Author :
        BitMansour, A.; Burns, S. M.; Traver, D.; Akashi, K.; Contag, C. H.; Weissman, I. L.; Brown, J. M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2002
      5. Publication :
        Blood
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        100
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Administration, Inhalation, Animals, Animals, Congenic, Aspergillosis/microbiology/*prevention & control, *Aspergillus fumigatus, Cell Lineage, Filgrastim/pharmacology, *Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, Injections, Intraperitoneal, Luminescent Measurements, Lung Diseases, Fungal/microbiology/*prevention & control, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Myeloid Progenitor Cells/physiology/*transplantation, Neutropenia/complications/drug therapy, Pseudomonas Infections/microbiology/*prevention & control, Radiation Chimera, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S., Tissue Distribution IVIS, Xenogen, Xen5
      12. Abstract :
        Myelotoxic treatments for oncologic diseases are often complicated by neutropenia, which renders patients susceptible to potentially lethal infections. In these studies of murine hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), cotransplantation of lineage-restricted progenitors known as common myeloid progenitors (CMP) and granulocyte-monocyte progenitors (GMP) protects against death following otherwise lethal challenge with either of 2 pathogens associated with neutropenia: Aspergillus fumigatus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Cotransplantation of CMP/GMP resulted in a significant and rapid increase in the absolute number of myeloid cells in the spleen, most of which were derived from the donor CMP/GMP. Despite persistent peripheral neutropenia, improved survival correlated with the measurable appearance of progenitor-derived myeloid cells in the spleen. A marked reduction or elimination of tissue pathogen load was confirmed by culture and correlated with survival. Localization of infection by P aeruginosa and extent of disease was also assessed by in vivo bioluminescent imaging using a strain of P aeruginosa engineered to constitutively express a bacterial luciferase. Imaging confirmed that transplantation with a graft containing hematopoietic stem cells and CMP/GMP reduced the bacterial load as early as 18 hours after infection. These results demonstrate that enhanced reconstitution of a tissue myeloid pool offers protection against lethal challenge with serious fungal and bacterial pathogens.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=12393415
      14. Call Number :
        136279
      15. Serial :
        7031
      1. Author :
        Goldberg, M.S.; Xing, D.; Ren, Y.; Orsulic, S.; Bhatia, S.N.; Sharp, P.A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        108
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        brca1; Cancer; In vivo imaging (VisEn); IVIS Spectrum imaging system; mice; siRNA; vivotag-750
      12. Abstract :
        Inhibition of the DNA repair enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) with small molecules has been shown to be an effective treatment for ovarian cancer with BRCA mutations. Here, we report the in vivo administration of siRNA to Parp1 in mouse models of ovarian cancer. A unique member of the lipid-like materials known as lipidoids is shown to deliver siRNA to disseminated murine ovarian carcinoma allograft tumors following intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. siParp1 inhibits cell growth, primarily by induction of apoptosis, in Brca1-deficient cells both in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, the treatment extends the survival of mice bearing tumors derived from Brca1-deficient ovarian cancer cells but not from Brca1 wild-type cells, confirming the proposed mechanism of synthetic lethality. Because there are 17 members of the Parp family, the inherent complementarity of RNA affords a high level of specificity for therapeutically addressing Parp1 in the context of impaired homologous recombination.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21187397
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 8448
      15. Serial :
        4805
      1. Author :
        Goldberg, M. S.; Xing, D.; Ren, Y.; Orsulic, S.; Bhatia, S. N.; Sharp, P. A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        108
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        VivoTag, IVIS, Vivotag, Animals; BRCA1 Protein/*genetics; Drug Carriers; Drug Delivery Systems; Female; Humans; Mice; Nanoparticles/*chemistry; Nanotechnology/methods; Neoplasm Transplantation; Ovarian Neoplasms/*genetics/*therapy; Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases/*genetics; RNA Interference; RNA, Small Interfering/*metabolism; Treatment Outcome
      12. Abstract :
        Inhibition of the DNA repair enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) with small molecules has been shown to be an effective treatment for ovarian cancer with BRCA mutations. Here, we report the in vivo administration of siRNA to Parp1 in mouse models of ovarian cancer. A unique member of the lipid-like materials known as lipidoids is shown to deliver siRNA to disseminated murine ovarian carcinoma allograft tumors following intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. siParp1 inhibits cell growth, primarily by induction of apoptosis, in Brca1-deficient cells both in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, the treatment extends the survival of mice bearing tumors derived from Brca1-deficient ovarian cancer cells but not from Brca1 wild-type cells, confirming the proposed mechanism of synthetic lethality. Because there are 17 members of the Parp family, the inherent complementarity of RNA affords a high level of specificity for therapeutically addressing Parp1 in the context of impaired homologous recombination.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21187397
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 5
      15. Serial :
        10566
      1. Author :
        Thomas Reiner, Rainer H. Kohler, Chong Wee Liew, Jonathan Hill, Jason Gaglia, Rohit Kulkarni and Ralph Weissleder
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Bioconjugate Chemistry
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        21
      8. Issue :
        7
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Metabolic Disorders
      11. Keywords :
        Beta-cells; GLP1-R; imaging; targeting; in vivo imaging; VivoTag; AngioSense; Diabetes
      12. Abstract :
        The ability to image and ultimately quantitate beta-cell mass in vivo will likely have far reaching implications in the study of diabetes biology, in the monitoring of disease progression or response to treatment, as well as for drug development. Here, using animal models, we report on the synthesis, characterization of, and intravital microscopic imaging properties of a near infrared fluorescent exendin-4 analogue with specificity for the GLP-1 receptor on beta cells (E4K12-Fl). The agent demonstrated sub-nanomolar EC50 binding concentrations, with high specificity and binding could be inhibited by GLP-1R agonists. Following intravenous administration to mice, pancreatic islets were readily distinguishable from exocrine pancreas, achieving target-to-background ratios within the pancreas of 6:1, as measured by intravital microscopy. Serial imaging revealed rapid accumulation kinetics (with initial signal within the islets detectable within 3 minutes and peak fluorescence within 20 minutes of injection) making this an ideal agent for in vivo imaging.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2912453/?tool=pubmed
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4561
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