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      1. Author :
        Kim, Jae-Beom; Urban, Konnie; Cochran, Edward; Lee, Steve; Ang, Angel; Rice, Bradley; Bata, Adam; Campbell, Kenneth; Coffee, Richard; Gorodinsky, Alex; Lu, Zhan; Zhou, He; Kishimoto, Takashi Kei; Lassota, Peter
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        PloS one
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        4T1-luc2; Animals; Bicuculline; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Diagnostic Imaging; Female; Genetic Vectors; Lentivirus; Luciferases; Luminescent Measurements; Lung Neoplasms; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Transplantation; Neoplasms; Sensitivity and Specificity; Time Factors; Transfection; Tumor Burden
      12. Abstract :
        Early detection of tumors can significantly improve the outcome of tumor treatment. One of the most frequently asked questions in cancer imaging is how many cells can be detected non-invasively in a live animal. Although many factors limit such detection, increasing the light emission from cells is one of the most effective ways of overcoming these limitations. Here, we describe development and utilization of a lentiviral vector containing enhanced firefly luciferase (luc2) gene. The resulting single cell clones of the mouse mammary gland tumor (4T1-luc2) showed stable light emission in the range of 10,000 photons/sec/cell. In some cases individual 4T1-luc2 cells inserted under the skin of a nu/nu mouse could be detected non-invasively using a cooled CCD camera in some cases. In addition, we showed that only few cells are needed to develop tumors in these mice and tumor progression can be monitored right after the cells are implanted. Significantly higher luciferase activity in these cells allowed us to detect micrometastases in both, syngeneic Balb/c and nu/nu mice.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20186331
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8938
      1. Author :
        Tsurumi, C.; Esser, N.; Firat, E.; Gaedicke, S.; Follo, M.; Behe, M.; Elsasser-Beile, U.; Grosu, A. L.; Graeser, R.; Niedermann, G.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Antigens, CD/*biosynthesis/*metabolism; Flow Cytometry/methods; Glioma/metabolism; Glycoproteins/*biosynthesis/*metabolism; Humans; Hybridomas/metabolism; Mice; Mice, Transgenic; Models, Biological; Neoplasm Metastasis; Neoplasm Transplantation; Neoplasms/*metabolism; Neoplastic Stem Cells; Peptides/*metabolism; Recurrence
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: Cancer stem cells are thought to play a pivotal role in tumor maintenance, metastasis, tumor therapy resistance and relapse. Hence, the development of methods for non-invasive in vivo detection of cancer stem cells is of great importance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we describe successful in vivo detection of CD133/prominin, a cancer stem cell surface marker for a variety of tumor entities. The CD133-specific monoclonal antibody AC133.1 was used for quantitative fluorescence-based optical imaging of mouse xenograft models based on isogenic pairs of CD133 positive and negative cell lines. A first set consisted of wild-type U251 glioblastoma cells, which do not express CD133, and lentivirally transduced CD133-overexpressing U251 cells. A second set made use of HCT116 colon carcinoma cells, which uniformly express CD133 at levels comparable to primary glioblastoma stem cells, and a CD133-negative HCT116 derivative. Not surprisingly, visualization and quantification of CD133 in overexpressing U251 xenografts was successful; more importantly, however, significant differences were also found in matched HCT116 xenograft pairs, despite the lower CD133 expression levels. The binding of i.v.-injected AC133.1 antibodies to CD133 positive, but not negative, tumor cells isolated from xenografts was confirmed by flow cytometry. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our results show that non-invasive antibody-based in vivo imaging of tumor-associated CD133 is feasible and that CD133 antibody-based tumor targeting is efficient. This should facilitate developing clinically applicable cancer stem cell imaging methods and CD133 antibody-based therapeutics.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21187924
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 15
      15. Serial :
        10382
      1. Author :
        Kenneth M. Kozloff, Luisa Quinti, Somying Patntirapong, Peter V. Hauschka, Ching-Hsuan Tung, Ralph Weissleder and Umar Mahmood
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Bone
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        44
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Physiology
      11. Keywords :
        FMT; ProSense; OsteoSense; bone; osteoclast; cathepsin K; non-invasive imaging; molecular imaging; fluorescence; in vivo imaging
      12. Abstract :
        Osteoclasts degrade bone matrix by demineralization followed by degradation of type I collagen through secretion of the cysteine protease, cathepsin K. Current imaging modalities are insufficient for sensitive observation of osteoclast activity, and in vivo live imaging of osteoclast resorption of bone has yet to be demonstrated. Here, we describe a near-infrared fluorescence reporter probe whose activation by cathepsin K is shown in live osteoclast cells and in mouse models of development and osteoclast upregulation. Cathepsin K probe activity was monitored in live osteoclast cultures and correlates with cathepsin K gene expression. In ovariectomized mice, cathepsin K probe upregulation precedes detection of bone loss by micro-computed tomography. These results are the first to demonstrate non-invasive visualization of bone degrading enzymes in models of accelerated bone loss, and may provide a means for early diagnosis of upregulated resorption and rapid feedback on efficacy of treatment protocols prior to significant loss of bone in the patient.
      13. URL :
        http://www.thebonejournal.com/article/S8756-3282(08)00816-8/abstract
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4526
      1. Author :
        Kozloff, K. M.; Quinti, L.; Patntirapong, S.; Hauschka, P. V.; Tung, C. H.; Weissleder, R.; Mahmood, U.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Bone
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        44
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, IVIS Animals; Animals, Newborn; Bone Development; Bone Resorption/enzymology; Calcification, Physiologic; Cathepsin K; Cathepsins/genetics/*metabolism; Cell Survival; Cells, Cultured; Cryoultramicrotomy; Female; Femur/pathology; Fluorescence; Humans; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; *Molecular Probe Techniques; Molecular Probes/metabolism; Osteoclasts/cytology/*enzymology; Ovariectomy; RNA, Messenger/genetics/metabolism; Up-Regulation
      12. Abstract :
        Osteoclasts degrade bone matrix by demineralization followed by degradation of type I collagen through secretion of the cysteine protease, cathepsin K. Current imaging modalities are insufficient for sensitive observation of osteoclast activity, and in vivo live imaging of osteoclast resorption of bone has yet to be demonstrated. Here, we describe a near-infrared fluorescence reporter probe whose activation by cathepsin K is shown in live osteoclast cells and in mouse models of development and osteoclast upregulation. Cathepsin K probe activity was monitored in live osteoclast cultures and correlates with cathepsin K gene expression. In ovariectomized mice, cathepsin K probe upregulation precedes detection of bone loss by micro-computed tomography. These results are the first to demonstrate non-invasive visualization of bone degrading enzymes in models of accelerated bone loss, and may provide a means for early diagnosis of upregulated resorption and rapid feedback on efficacy of treatment protocols prior to significant loss of bone in the patient.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19007918
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10466
      1. Author :
        Lyons, Scott K; Lim, Ed; Clermont, Anne O; Dusich, Joan; Zhu, Lingyun; Campbell, Kenneth D; Coffee, Richard J; Grass, David S; Hunter, John; Purchio, Tony; Jenkins, Darlene
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2006
      5. Publication :
        Cancer research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        66
      8. Issue :
        9
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Androgens; Animals; Bioware; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic; Disease Models, Animal; Genes, Reporter; Humans; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; In Situ Hybridization; Luciferases, Firefly; Luminescent Measurements; Male; Mice; Mice, Transgenic; PC-3M-luc; Promoter Regions, Genetic; Prostate; Prostate-Specific Antigen; Prostatic Neoplasms
      12. Abstract :
        Several transgenic mouse models of prostate cancer have been developed recently that are able to recapitulate many key biological features of the human condition. It would, therefore, be desirable to employ these models to test the efficacy of new therapeutics before clinical trial; however, the variable onset and non-visible nature of prostate tumor development limit their use for such applications. We now report the generation of a transgenic reporter mouse that should obviate these limitations by enabling noninvasive in vivo bioluminescence imaging of normal and spontaneously transformed prostate tissue in the mouse. We used an 11-kb fragment of the human prostate-specific antigen (PSA) promoter to achieve specific and robust expression of firefly luciferase in the prostate glands of transgenic mice. Ex vivo bioluminescence imaging and in situ hybridization analysis confirmed that luciferase expression was restricted to the epithelium in all four lobes of the prostate. We also show that PSA-Luc mice exhibit decreased but readily detectable levels of in vivo bioluminescence over extended time periods following androgen ablation. These results suggest that this reporter should enable in vivo imaging of both androgen-dependent and androgen-independent prostate tumor models. As proof-of-principle, we show that we could noninvasively image SV40 T antigen-induced prostate tumorigenesis in mice with PSA-Luc. Furthermore, we show that our noninvasive imaging strategy can be successfully used to image tumor response to androgen ablation in transgenic mice and, as a result, that we can rapidly identify individual animals capable of sustaining tumor growth in the absence of androgen.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16651422
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8975
      1. Author :
        Kadurugamuwa, J. L.; Modi, K.; Yu, J.; Francis, K. P.; Purchio, T.; Contag, P. R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Infection and Immunity
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        73
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals, Diagnostic Imaging/ methods, Female, Mice, Microscopy, Electron, Scanning, Photons, Proteus Infections/ diagnosis, Proteus mirabilis/drug effects/isolation & purification, Pseudomonas Infections/ diagnosis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa/drug effects/isolation & purification, Urinary Catheterization/ adverse effects, Urinary Tract Infections/ diagnosis IVIS, Xenogen, Xen5, Xen44
      12. Abstract :
        Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections acquired by humans, particularly in catheterized patients. A major problem with catheterization is the formation of bacterial biofilms on catheter material and the risk of developing persistent UTIs that are difficult to monitor and eradicate. To better understand the course of UTIs and allow more accurate studies of in vivo antibiotic efficacy, we developed a catheter-based biofilm infection model with mice, using bioluminescently engineered bacteria. Two important urinary tract pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis, were made bioluminescent by stable insertion of a complete lux operon. Segments of catheter material (precolonized or postimplant infected) with either pathogen were placed transurethrally in the lumen of the bladder by using a metal stylet without surgical manipulation. The bioluminescent strains were sufficiently bright to be readily monitored from the outside of infected animals, using a low-light optical imaging system, including the ability to trace the ascending pattern of light-emitting bacteria through ureters to the kidneys. Placement of the catheter in the bladder not only resulted in the development of strong cystitis that persisted significantly longer than in mice challenged with bacterial suspensions alone but also required prolonged antibiotic treatment to reduce the level of infection. Treatment of infected mice for 4 days with ciprofloxacin at 30 mg/kg of body weight twice a day cured cystitis and renal infection in noncatheterized mice. Similarly, ciprofloxacin reduced the bacterial burden to undetectable levels in catheterized mice but did not inhibit rebound of the infection upon cessation of antibiotic therapy. This methodology easily allows spatial information to be monitored sequentially throughout the entire disease process, including ascending UTI, treatment efficacy, and relapse, all without exogenous sampling, which is not possible with conventional methods.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15972473
      14. Call Number :
        139333
      15. Serial :
        7110
      1. Author :
        Tafreshi, N. K.; Bui, M. M.; Bishop, K.; Lloyd, M. C.; Enkemann, S. A.; Lopez, A. S.; Abrahams, D.; Carter, B. W.; Vagner, J.; Grobmyer, S. R.; Gillies, R. J.; Morse, D. L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Clin Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        18
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        VivoTag, IVIS, Vivotag, Animals; Antibodies, Monoclonal/*diagnostic use/immunology/pharmacokinetics; Antigens, Neoplasm/*metabolism; Blotting, Western; Breast/immunology/metabolism/pathology; Breast Neoplasms/*diagnosis/immunology/metabolism; Carbonic Anhydrases/*metabolism; Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/*diagnosis/immunology/metabolism; Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating/*diagnosis/immunology/metabolism; *Diagnostic Imaging; Female; Fluorescent Antibody Technique; Gene Expression Profiling; Humans; Luciferases/metabolism; Luminescent Measurements; Lymphatic Metastasis; Mice; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Invasiveness; Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis; RNA, Messenger/genetics; Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction; Tissue Array Analysis; Tissue Distribution; Tumor Cells, Cultured; Tumor Markers, Biological/genetics/metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        PURPOSE: To develop targeted molecular imaging probes for the noninvasive detection of breast cancer lymph node metastasis. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Six cell surface or secreted markers were identified by expression profiling and from the literature as being highly expressed in breast cancer lymph node metastases. Two of these markers were cell surface carbonic anhydrase isozymes (CAIX and/or CAXII) and were validated for protein expression by immunohistochemistry of patient tissue samples on a breast cancer tissue microarray containing 47 normal breast tissue samples, 42 ductal carcinoma in situ, 43 invasive ductal carcinomas without metastasis, 46 invasive ductal carcinomas with metastasis, and 49 lymph node macrometastases of breast carcinoma. Targeted probes were developed by conjugation of CAIX- and CAXII-specific monoclonal antibodies to a near-infrared fluorescent dye. RESULTS: Together, these two markers were expressed in 100% of the lymph node metastases surveyed. Selectivity of the imaging probes were confirmed by intravenous injection into nude mice-bearing mammary fat pad tumors of marker-expressing cells and nonexpressing cells or by preinjection of unlabeled antibody. Imaging of lymph node metastases showed that peritumorally injected probes detected nodes harboring metastatic tumor cells. As few as 1,000 cells were detected, as determined by implanting, under ultrasound guidance, a range in number of CAIX- and CAXII-expressing cells into the axillary lymph nodes. CONCLUSION: These imaging probes have potential for noninvasive staging of breast cancer in the clinic and elimination of unneeded surgery, which is costly and associated with morbidities.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22016510
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10568
      1. Author :
        Hickson, J; Ackler, S; Klaubert, D; Bouska, J; Ellis, P; Foster, K; Oleksijew, A; Rodriguez, L; Schlessinger, S; Wang, B; Frost, D
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cell death and differentiation
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        17
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Apoptosis; Bioware; Caspase 3; Cell Line, Tumor; Female; Firefly Luciferin; Humans; Luminescent Agents; MDA-MB-231-D3H2LN cells; Mice; Mice, SCID; SKOV3-luc-D3 cells; Molecular Imaging; Neoplasms; Oligopeptides; Taxoids
      12. Abstract :
        Apoptosis is a highly regulated process of programmed cell death essential for normal physiology. Dysregulation of apoptosis contributes to the development and progression of various diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and chronic heart failure. Quantitative noninvasive imaging of apoptosis in preclinical models would allow for dynamic longitudinal screening of compounds and facilitates a more rapid determination of therapeutic efficacy. In this study, we report the in vivo characterization of Z-DEVD-aminoluciferin, a modified firefly luciferase substrate that in apoptotic cells is cleaved by caspase-3 to liberate aminoluciferin, which can be consumed by luciferase to generate a luminescent signal. In two oncology models, namely SKOV3-luc and MDA-MB-231-luc-LN, at 24, 48, and 72 h after treatment with docetaxel, animals were injected with Z-DEVD-aminoluciferin and bioluminescent images were acquired. Significantly more light was detected at 24 (P<0.05), 48 (P<0.01), and 72 h (P<0.01) in the docetaxel-treated group compared with the vehicle-treated group, with caspase-3 activation at these time points confirmed using immunohistochemistry. Importantly, whereas significant differences between groups were detected as early as 24 h after treatment by molecular imaging, caliper measurements were unable to detect a difference for 4-5 additional days. Taken together, these data show that in vivo imaging of apoptosis using Z-DEVD-aminoluciferin could provide a sensitive and rapid method for early detection of drug efficacy, which could potentially be used by numerous therapeutic programs.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20057500
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8950
      1. Author :
        Kadurugamuwa, J. L.; Modi, K.; Yu, J.; Francis, K. P.; Orihuela, C.; Tuomanen, E.; Purchio, A. F.; Contag, P. R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Mol Imaging
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        4
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals, Diagnostic Imaging, Disease Models, Animal, Female, Luminescent Measurements/methods, Meningitis, Pneumococcal/drug therapy/microbiology/ radiography, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Streptococcus pneumoniae/drug effects IVIS, Xenogen, Xen10
      12. Abstract :
        Noninvasive real-time in vivo bioluminescent imaging was used to assess the spread of Streptococcus pneumoniae throughout the spinal cord and brain during the acute stages of bacterial meningitis. A mouse model was established by lumbar (LP) or intracisternal (IC) injection of bioluminescent S. pneumoniae into the subarachnoid space. Bacteria replicated initially at the site of inoculation and spread progressively from the spinal cord to the brain or from the brain down to the cervical part of the spinal column and to the lower vertebral levels. After 24 hr, animals showed strong bioluminescent signals throughout the spinal canal, indicating acute meningitis of the intracranial and intraspinal meninges. A decline in bacterial cell viability, as judged by a reduction in the bioluminescent signal, was observed over time in animals treated with ceftriaxone, but not in untreated groups. Mice treated with the antibiotic survived infection, whereas all mice in untreated groups became moribund, first in the IC group then in the LP group. No untreated animal survived beyond 48 hr after induction of infection. Colony counts of infected cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) correlated positively with bioluminescent signals. This methodology is especially appealing because it allows detecting infected mice as early as 3 hr after inoculation, provide temporal, sequential, and spatial distribution of bacteria within the brain and spinal cord throughout the entire disease process and the rapid monitoring of treatment efficacy in a nondestructive manner. Moreover, it avoids the need to sacrifice the animals for CSF sampling and the potential manipulative damage that can occur with other conventional methods.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16105511
      14. Call Number :
        139330
      15. Serial :
        7143
      1. Author :
        Kenneth M Kozloff, Ralph Weissleder and Umar Mahmood
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Bone and Mineral Research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        22
      8. Issue :
        8
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Physiology
      11. Keywords :
        FMT; OsteoSense; ProSense bone mineralization; bone turnover markers; molecular imaging; bisphosphonates; in vivo imaging
      12. Abstract :
        Abstract: FRFP binds to mineral at osteoblastic, osteoclastic, and quiescent surfaces, with accumulation likely modulated by vascular delivery. In vivo visualization and quantification of binding can be accomplished noninvasively in animal models through optical tomographic imaging.

        Introduction: The development of near-infrared optical markers as reporters of bone metabolism will be useful for early diagnosis of disease. Bisphosphonates bind differentially to osteoblastic and osteoclastic surfaces depending on choice of side-chain and dose, and fluorescently tagged bisphosphonates provide a convenient way to visualize these sites. This study examines the ability of a fluorescently labeled pamidronate imaging probe to bind to regions of bone formation and resorption in vivo.

        Materials and Methods: In vitro binding of a far-red fluorescent pamidronate (FRFP) to mineral was assessed using intact and demineralized dentine slices. In vivo, FRFP binding was studied in three models: developing neonatal mouse, bone healing after injury, and metastasis-induced osteolysis and fracture. 3D fluorescence molecular tomographic (FMT) imaging was used to visualize signal deep within the body.

        Results: FRFP binding to bone depends on the quantity of mineral present and can be liberated from the bone during decalcification. In vivo, FRFP binds to surfaces of actively forming bone, as assessed by alkaline phosphatase staining, surfaces undergoing active resorption, as noted by scalloped bone border and presence of osteoclasts, and to quiescent surfaces not involved in formation or resorption. Binding is likely modulated by vascular delivery of the imaging agent to the exposed mineral surface and total quantity of surface exposed.FMT imaging is capable of visualizing regions of bone formation because of a large volume of labeled surface, but like radiolabeled bone scans, cannot discriminate pure osteolysis caused by metastasis.

        Conclusions: FRFP may function as a local biomarker of bisphosphonate deposition to assess interplay between drug and cellular environment or may be combined with other imaging agents or fluorescent cells for the noninvasive assessment of local bone metabolism in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1359/jbmr.070504/references?url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Ajournal&rft.genre=article&rft.jtitle=Nat%20Med&rft.atitle=Shedding%20light%20onto%20live%20molecular%20targets&rft.volume=9&rf
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4530
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