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      1. Author :
        Zongjin Li, Kitchener D. Wilson, Bryan Smith, Daniel L. Kraft, Fangjun Jia, Mei Huang, Xiaoyan Xie, Robert C. Robbins, Sanjiv S. Gambhir, Irving L. Weissman and Joseph C. Wu
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        4
      8. Issue :
        12
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        in vivo imaging; human embryonic stem cells; hESCs; endothelial cells; ECs; AngioSense
      12. Abstract :
        Background: Differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into endothelial cells (hESC-ECs) has the potential to provide an unlimited source of cells for novel transplantation therapies of ischemic diseases by supporting angiogenesis and vasculogenesis. However, the endothelial differentiation efficiency of the conventional embryoid body (EB) method is low while the 2-dimensional method of co-culturing with mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) require animal product, both of which can limit the future clinical application of hESC-ECs. Moreover, to fully understand the beneficial effects of stem cell therapy, investigators must be able to track the functional biology and physiology of transplanted cells in living subjects over time.

        Methodology: In this study, we developed an extracellular matrix (ECM) culture system for increasing endothelial differentiation and free from contaminating animal cells. We investigated the transcriptional changes that occur during endothelial differentiation of hESCs using whole genome microarray, and compared to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We also showed functional vascular formation by hESC-ECs in a mouse dorsal window model. Moreover, our study is the first so far to transplant hESC-ECs in a myocardial infarction model and monitor cell fate using molecular imaging methods.

        Conclusion: Taken together, we report a more efficient method for derivation of hESC-ECs that express appropriate patterns of endothelial genes, form functional vessels in vivo, and improve cardiac function. These studies suggest that hESC-ECs may provide a novel therapy for ischemic heart disease in the future.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2795856/?tool=pubmed
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4557
      1. Author :
        Aki Hanyu; Kiyotsugu Kojima; Kiyohiko Hatake; Kimie Nomura; Hironori Murayama; Yuichi Ishikawa; Satoshi Miyata; Masaru Ushijima; Masaaki Matsuura; Etsuro Ogata; Keiji Miyazawa;Takeshi Imamura
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Science
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        100
      8. Issue :
        11
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        Angiogenesis; metastasis; in vivo imaging; fluorescence imaging
      12. Abstract :
        Angiogenesis plays a crucial role in cancer progression and metastasis. Thus, blocking tumor angiogenesis is potentially a universal approach to prevent tumor establishment and metastasis. In this study, we used in vivo and ex vivo fluorescence imaging to show that an antihuman vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody represses angiogenesis and the growth of primary tumors of human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells in implanted nude mice. Interestingly, administering the antihuman VEGF antibody reduced the development of new blood vessels and normalized pre-existing tumor vasculature in HT1080 cell tumors. In addition, antihuman VEGF antibody treatment decreased lung metastasis from the primary tumor, whereas it failed to block lung metastasis in a lung colonization experiment in which tumor cells were injected into the tail vein. These results suggest that VEGF produced by primary HT1080 cell tumors has a crucial effect on lung metastasis. The present study indicates that the in vivo fluorescent microscopy system will be useful to investigate the biology of angiogenesis and test the effectiveness of angiogenesis inhibitors.
      13. URL :
        http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1349-7006.2009.01305.x/full
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4495
      1. Author :
        Gule, N. P.; de Kwaadsteniet, M.; Cloete, T. E.; Klumperman, B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Water Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen5, Xen39, Xen26, Xen14, Xen36, Xen 5, Xen 39, Xen 26, Xen 14, Xen 36, Psuedomonas aeruginosa, S. aureus, Klebsiella, E. coli, Salmonella,
      12. Abstract :
        The 3(2H) furanone derivative 2,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone (DMHF) was investigated for its antimicrobial and cell-adhesion inhibition properties against Klebsiella pneumoniae Xen 39, Staphylococcus aureus Xen 36, Escherichia coli Xen 14, Pseudomonas aeruginosa Xen 5 and Salmonella typhimurium Xen 26. Nanofibers electrospun from solution blends of DMHF and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) were tested for their ability to inhibit surface-attachment of bacteria. Antimicrobial and adhesion inhibition activity was determined via the plate counting technique. To quantify viable but non-culturable cells and to validate the plate counting results, bioluminescence and fluorescence studies were carried out. Nanofiber production was upscaled using the bubble electrospinning technique. To ascertain that no DMHF leached into filtered water, samples of water filtered through the nanofibrous mats were analyzed using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) were used to characterize the electrospun nanofibers.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23261340
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 7
      15. Serial :
        10548
      1. Author :
        Gule, N. P.; de Kwaadsteniet, M.; Cloete, T. E.; Klumperman, B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Water Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen5, Xen39, Xen26, Xen14, Xen36, Xen 5, Xen 39, Xen 26, Xen 14, Xen 36, Psuedomonas aeruginosa, S. aureus, Klebsiella, E. coli, Salmonella,
      12. Abstract :
        The 3(2H) furanone derivative 2,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone (DMHF) was investigated for its antimicrobial and cell-adhesion inhibition properties against Klebsiella pneumoniae Xen 39, Staphylococcus aureus Xen 36, Escherichia coli Xen 14, Pseudomonas aeruginosa Xen 5 and Salmonella typhimurium Xen 26. Nanofibers electrospun from solution blends of DMHF and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) were tested for their ability to inhibit surface-attachment of bacteria. Antimicrobial and adhesion inhibition activity was determined via the plate counting technique. To quantify viable but non-culturable cells and to validate the plate counting results, bioluminescence and fluorescence studies were carried out. Nanofiber production was upscaled using the bubble electrospinning technique. To ascertain that no DMHF leached into filtered water, samples of water filtered through the nanofibrous mats were analyzed using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) were used to characterize the electrospun nanofibers.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23261340
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 8
      15. Serial :
        10549
      1. Author :
        Lamppa, J. W.; Ackerman, M. E.; Lai, J. I.; Scanlon, T. C.; Griswold, K. E.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen5, Xen 5, Pseudomonas aeruginosa Xen 5
      12. Abstract :
        Alginate lyase enzymes represent prospective biotherapeutic agents for treating bacterial infections, particularly in the cystic fibrosis airway. To effectively deimmunize one therapeutic candidate while maintaining high level catalytic proficiency, a combined genetic engineering-PEGylation strategy was implemented. Rationally designed, site-specific PEGylation variants were constructed by orthogonal maleimide-thiol coupling chemistry. In contrast to random PEGylation of the enzyme by NHS-ester mediated chemistry, controlled mono-PEGylation of A1-III alginate lyase produced a conjugate that maintained wild type levels of activity towards a model substrate. Significantly, the PEGylated variant exhibited enhanced solution phase kinetics with bacterial alginate, the ultimate therapeutic target. The immunoreactivity of the PEGylated enzyme was compared to a wild type control using in vitro binding studies with both enzyme-specific antibodies, from immunized New Zealand white rabbits, and a single chain antibody library, derived from a human volunteer. In both cases, the PEGylated enzyme was found to be substantially less immunoreactive. Underscoring the enzyme's potential for practical utility, >90% of adherent, mucoid, Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were removed from abiotic surfaces following a one hour treatment with the PEGylated variant, whereas the wild type enzyme removed only 75% of biofilms in parallel studies. In aggregate, these results demonstrate that site-specific mono-PEGylation of genetically engineered A1-III alginate lyase yielded an enzyme with enhanced performance relative to therapeutically relevant metrics.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21340021
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10388
      1. Author :
        Nguyen, V. H.; Kim, H. S.; Ha, J. M.; Hong, Y.; Choy, H. E.; Min, J. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        70
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals, Blotting, Western, Xen26, Cell Line, Tumor, Diagnostic Imaging/methods, Gene Therapy/*methods, Genetic Engineering/*methods, Genetic Vectors/*therapeutic use, Humans, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Neoplasms/*therapy, Perforin/*genetics/therapeutic use, Promoter Regions, Genetic, Salmonella typhimurium/*genetics, bcl-Associated Death Protein/genetics IVIS, Xenogen
      12. Abstract :
        Tumor-targeting bacteria have been studied in terms of their ability to visualize the infection pathway (through imaging probes) or to carry therapeutic molecules to tumors. To integrate these monitoring and therapeutic functions, we engineered attenuated Salmonella typhimurium defective in guanosine 5'-diphosphate-3'-diphosphate synthesis to carry cytotoxic proteins (cytolysin A) and express reporter genes. We successfully visualized the therapeutic process with these engineered bacteria in mice and found that they often mediated complete tumor (CT-26) eradication on cytotoxic gene induction. Furthermore, treatment with the engineered bacteria markedly suppressed metastatic tumor growth.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=20028866
      14. Call Number :
        141643
      15. Serial :
        6246
      1. Author :
        Nguyen, V. H.; Kim, H. S.; Ha, J. M.; Hong, Y.; Choy, H. E.; Min, J. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        70
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen26, Xen 26, Salmonella typhumurium, Animals; Blotting, Western; Cell Line, Tumor; Diagnostic Imaging/methods; Gene Therapy/*methods; Genetic Engineering/*methods; Genetic Vectors/*therapeutic use; Humans; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Neoplasms/*therapy; Perforin/*genetics/therapeutic use; Promoter Regions, Genetic; Salmonella typhimurium/*genetics; bcl-Associated Death Protein/genetics
      12. Abstract :
        Tumor-targeting bacteria have been studied in terms of their ability to visualize the infection pathway (through imaging probes) or to carry therapeutic molecules to tumors. To integrate these monitoring and therapeutic functions, we engineered attenuated Salmonella typhimurium defective in guanosine 5'-diphosphate-3'-diphosphate synthesis to carry cytotoxic proteins (cytolysin A) and express reporter genes. We successfully visualized the therapeutic process with these engineered bacteria in mice and found that they often mediated complete tumor (CT-26) eradication on cytotoxic gene induction. Furthermore, treatment with the engineered bacteria markedly suppressed metastatic tumor growth.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20028866
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10560
      1. Author :
        Korotcov, A. V.; Ye, Y.; Chen, Y.; Zhang, F.; Huang, S.; Lin, S.; Sridhar, R.; Achilefu, S.; Wang, P. C.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Mol Imaging Biol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        14
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        PC-3M-luc-C6, PC-3M-luc, IVIS, Bioware, Prostate cancer, Bioluminescence, Animals; Cell Line, Tumor; Endocytosis; Fluorescent Dyes/chemistry/*diagnostic use; Glucosamine/chemistry/*diagnostic use; Humans; Kinetics; Male; Mice; Mice, Nude; Molecular Imaging/*methods; Neoplasms/*diagnosis/pathology; Optical Devices; Prostatic Neoplasms/diagnosis/pathology; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared; Tissue Distribution; *Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        PURPOSE: Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging is an attractive technique for studying diseases at the molecular level in vivo. Glucose transporters are often used as targets for in vivo imaging of tumors. The efficiency of a tumor-seeking fluorescent probe can be enhanced by attaching one or more glucosamine (GlcN) moieties. This study was designed to evaluate the use of previously developed GlcN-linked NIRF probes for in vitro and in vivo optical imaging of cancer. PROCEDURES: Cellular uptake of the probes (1 muM) was investigated in monolayer cultures of luciferase-expressing PC3 (PC3-luc) cells. The prostate tumors were established as subcutaneous xenografts using PC3-luc cells in nude mice. The biodistributions and tumor-targeting specificities of cypate (cyp), cypate-D: -(+)-glucosamine (cyp-GlcN), and D: -(+)-gluosamine-cypate-D: -(+)-gluosamine (cyp-2GlcN) were studied. The tumor, muscle, and major organs were collected for ex vivo optical imaging. RESULTS: The tumor cell uptake of the probe containing two glucosamine residues, cyp-2GlcN, was significantly higher than the uptake of both the probe with one glucosamine residue, cyp-GlcN, and the probe without glucosamine, cyp only. Similarly, in in vivo experiments, cyp-2GlcN demonstrated higher maximum fluorescence intensity and longer residence lifetime in tumors than cyp-GlcN or cyp. The ex vivo biodistribution analysis revealed that tumor uptake of cyp-2GlcN and cyp-GlcN was four- and twofold higher than that of cyp at 24 h post-injection, respectively. CONCLUSION: Both cyp-GlcN and cyp-2GlcN NIRF probes exhibited good tumor-targeting properties in prostate cancer cell cultures and live mice. The cyp-2GlcN probe showed the highest uptake with good retention characteristics in vivo. The uptake of cyp-2GlcN and cyp-GlcN is likely mediated by glucosamine-recognizing transporters. The uptake mechanism is being explored further for developing cypate-glucosamine-based probes for in vivo imaging.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21971932
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10536
      1. Author :
        Yan, J.; Meng, X.; Wancket, L. M.; Lintner, K.; Nelin, L. D.; Chen, B.; Francis, K. P.; Smith, C. V.; Rogers, L. K.; Liu, Y.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Immunol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        188
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Escherichia coli/immunology; Escherichia coli Infections/enzymology/immunology/*prevention & control; Extracellular Space/genetics/*immunology/metabolism; Glutathione Reductase/deficiency/genetics/*physiology; Humans; Mice; Mice, Inbred C3H; Mice, Knockout; Neutrophils/*immunology/*metabolism/microbiology; Oxidative Stress/genetics/*immunology; Phagocytosis/genetics/*immunology; Staphylococcal Infections/enzymology/immunology/*prevention & control; Staphylococcus aureus/immunology
      12. Abstract :
        Glutathione reductase (Gsr) catalyzes the reduction of glutathione disulfide to glutathione, which plays an important role in the bactericidal function of phagocytes. Because Gsr has been implicated in the oxidative burst in human neutrophils and is abundantly expressed in the lymphoid system, we hypothesized that Gsr-deficient mice would exhibit marked defects during the immune response against bacterial challenge. We report in this study that Gsr-null mice exhibited enhanced susceptibility to Escherichia coli challenge, indicated by dramatically increased bacterial burden, cytokine storm, striking histological abnormalities, and substantially elevated mortality. Additionally, Gsr-null mice exhibited elevated sensitivity to Staphylococcus aureus. Examination of the bactericidal functions of the neutrophils from Gsr-deficient mice in vitro revealed impaired phagocytosis and defective bacterial killing activities. Although Gsr catalyzes the regeneration of glutathione, a major cellular antioxidant, Gsr-deficient neutrophils paradoxically produced far less reactive oxygen species upon activation both ex vivo and in vivo. Unlike wild-type neutrophils that exhibited a sustained oxidative burst upon stimulation with phorbol ester and fMLP, Gsr-deficient neutrophils displayed a very transient oxidative burst that abruptly ceased shortly after stimulation. Likewise, Gsr-deficient neutrophils also exhibited an attenuated oxidative burst upon encountering E. coli. Biochemical analysis revealed that the hexose monophosphate shunt was compromised in Gsr-deficient neutrophils. Moreover, Gsr-deficient neutrophils displayed a marked impairment in the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps, a bactericidal mechanism that operates after neutrophil death. Thus, Gsr-mediated redox regulation is crucial for bacterial clearance during host defense against massive bacterial challenge.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22279102
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10398
      1. Author :
        Hokaiwado, Naomi; Takeshita, Fumitaka; Naiki-Ito, Aya; Asamoto, Makoto; Ochiya, Takahiro; Shirai, Tomoyuki
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Carcinogenesis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        29
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Androgens; Animals; Animals, Genetically Modified; Apoptosis; Bioware; Blotting, Western; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Proliferation; Glutathione S-Transferase pi; Humans; In Situ Nick-End Labeling; Male; Neoplasm Transplantation; Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis; PC-3M-luc; Prostatic Neoplasms; Rats; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction; RNA, Small Interfering
      12. Abstract :
        Prostate cancers generally acquire an androgen-independent growth capacity with progression, resulting in resistance to antiandrogen therapy. Therefore, identification of the genes regulated through this process may be important for understanding the mechanisms of prostate carcinogenesis. We here utilized androgen-dependent/independent transplantable tumors, newly established with the 'transgenic rat adenocarcinoma in prostate' (TRAP) model, to analyze their gene expression using microarrays. Among the overexpressed genes in androgen-independent prostate cancers compared with the androgen-dependent tumors, glutathione S-transferase pi (GST-pi) was included. In line with this, human prostate cancer cell lines PC3 and DU145 (androgen independent) had higher expression of GST-pi compared with LNCaP (androgen dependent) as determined by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis. To investigate the roles of GST-pi expression in androgen-independent human prostate cancers, GST-pi was knocked down by a small interfering RNA (siRNA), resulting in significant decrease of the proliferation rate in the androgen-independent PC3 cell line. In vivo, administration of GST-pi siRNA-atelocollagen complex decreased GST-pi protein expression, resulting in enhanced numbers of TdT mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end labering (TUNEL)-positive apoptotic cells. These findings suggest that GST-pi might play important roles in proliferation of androgen-independent human prostate cancer cells.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18413363
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8967
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