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      1. Author :
        David E Sosnovik, Matthias Nahrendorf and Ralph Weissleder
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Nature Reviews Cardiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        in vivo imaging; fluorescence imaging, molecular imaging, MRI, myocardium, SPECT; MMPSense
      12. Abstract :
        Molecular imaging agents can be targeted to a specific receptor or protein on the cardiomyocyte surface, or to enzymes released into the interstitial space, such as cathepsins, matrix metalloproteinases and myeloperoxidase. Molecular imaging of the myocardium, however, requires the imaging agent to be small, sensitive (nanomolar levels or better), and able to gain access to the interstitial space. Several novel agents that fulfill these criteria have been used for targeted molecular imaging applications in the myocardium. Magnetic resonance, fluorescence, and single-photon emission CT have been used to image the molecular signals generated by these agents. The use of targeted imaging agents in the myocardium has the potential to provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of myocardial injury and to facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2597275/?tool=pubmed
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4650
      1. Author :
        Kimberly A. Kelly; Nabeel Bardeesy; Rajesh Anbazhagan; Sushma Gurumurthy; Justin Berger; Herlen Alencar; Ronald A. DePinho; Umar Mahmood; Ralph Weissleder
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        PLoS Medicine
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        15
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer; Biology
      11. Keywords :
        in vivo imaging; cancer
      12. Abstract :
        Background: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) carries an extremely poor prognosis, typically presenting with metastasis at the time of diagnosis and exhibiting profound resistance to existing therapies. The development of molecular markers and imaging probes for incipient PDAC would enable earlier detection and guide the development of interventive therapies. Here we sought to identify novel molecular markers and to test their potential as targeted imaging agents.

        Methods and Findings: Here, a phage display approach was used in a mouse model of PDAC to screen for peptides that specifically bind to cell surface antigens on PDAC cells. These screens yielded a motif that distinguishes PDAC cells from normal pancreatic duct cells in vitro, which, upon proteomics analysis, identified plectin-1 as a novel biomarker of PDAC. To assess their utility for in vivo imaging, the plectin-1 targeted peptides (PTP) were conjugated to magnetofluorescent nanoparticles. In conjunction with intravital confocal microscopy and MRI, these nanoparticles enabled detection of small PDAC and precursor lesions in engineered mouse models.

        Conclusions: Our approach exploited a well-defined model of PDAC, enabling rapid identification and validation of PTP. The developed specific imaging probe, along with the discovery of plectin-1 as a novel biomarker, may have clinical utility in the diagnosis and management of PDAC in humans.
      13. URL :
        http://www.plosmedicine.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pmed.0050085
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4478
      1. Author :
        Cerchia, L.; Esposito, C. L.; Camorani, S.; Rienzo, A.; Stasio, L.; Insabato, L.; Affuso, A.; de Franciscis, V.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Mol Ther
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        20
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        A549-luc-C8, A549-luc, IVIS, Bioware
      12. Abstract :
        Axl is a tyrosine kinase receptor that was first identified as a transforming gene in human myeloid leukemia. Recent converging evidence suggests its implication in cancer progression and invasion for several solid tumors, including lung, breast, brain, thyroid, and pancreas. In the last decade, Axl has thus become an attractive target for therapeutic development of more aggressive cancers. An emerging class of therapeutic inhibitors is now represented by short nucleic acid aptamers. These molecules act as high affinity ligands with several advantages over conventional antibodies for their use in vivo, including their small size and negligible immunogenicity. Furthermore, these molecules can easily form conjugates able to drive the specific delivery of interfering RNAs, nanoparticles, or chemotherapeutics. We have thus generated and characterized a selective RNA-based aptamer, GL21.T that binds the extracellular domain of Axl at high affinity (12 nmol/l) and inhibits its catalytic activity. GL21.T blocked Axl-dependent transducing events in vitro, including Erk and Akt phosphorylation, cell migration and invasion, as well as in vivo lung tumor formation in mice xenografts. In this respect, the GL21.T aptamer represents a promising therapeutic molecule for Axl-dependent cancers whose importance is highlighted by the paucity of available Axl-specific inhibitory molecules.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22910292
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10520
      1. Author :
        Keereweer, S.; Mol, I. M.; Kerrebijn, J. D.; Van Driel, P. B.; Xie, B.; Baatenburg de Jong, R. J.; Vahrmeijer, A. L.; Lowik, C. W.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Surg Oncol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        105
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/*pathology/surgery; Fluorescent Dyes/*diagnostic use; Humans; Integrin alphaVbeta3/*metabolism; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mouth Neoplasms/*pathology/surgery; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared; *Surgery, Computer-Assisted
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence optical imaging is a promising technique to assess the tumor margins during cancer surgery. This technique requires targeting by specific fluorescence agents to differentiate tumor from normal surrounding tissue. We assessed the feasibility of cancer detection using NIR fluorescence agents that target either alphavbeta3 integrins or the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect in an orthotopic mouse model of oral cancer. METHODS: Binding of the integrin-targeted agent to tumor cells was assessed in vitro. Oral cancer was induced in 6 BALB/c nu/nu mice by submucosal inoculation of human OSC19-luc cells into the tongue. Tumor growth was followed with bioluminescence imaging. A combination of agents targeting integrins or EPR effect was injected followed by fluorescence imaging in vivo and ex vivo after resection of the tongues. RESULTS: Oral cancer was clearly demarcated in vitro; in vivo; and on histological analysis with sufficient tumor-to-background ratios of the contrast agents. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the feasibility of optical imaging of oral squamous cell carcinoma based on targeting of alphavbeta3 integrins and the EPR effect. Once these NIR fluorescence agents become available for clinical testing, optical image-guided surgery could reduce residual disease after oral cancer surgery.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21952950
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 28
      15. Serial :
        10368
      1. Author :
        Zollo, M.; Di Dato, V.; Spano, D.; De Martino, D.; Liguori, L.; Marino, N.; Vastolo, V.; Navas, L.; Garrone, B.; Mangano, G.; Biondi, G.; Guglielmotti, A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Clin Exp Metastasis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        29
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        PC-3M-luc2, PC3M-luc2, IVIS, Prostate Cancer, Bioware, Animals; Breast Neoplasms/*pathology; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Movement; Cell Proliferation; Chemokine CCL2/*biosynthesis/chemistry/metabolism; Female; Humans; Indazoles/*pharmacology; Macrophages/metabolism; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; NF-kappa B/metabolism; Neoplasm Metastasis; Neoplasm Transplantation; Propionates/*pharmacology; Prostatic Neoplasms/*pathology; Signal Transduction
      12. Abstract :
        Prostate and breast cancer are major causes of death worldwide, mainly due to patient relapse upon disease recurrence through formation of metastases. Chemokines are small proteins with crucial roles in the immune system, and their regulation is finely tuned in early inflammatory responses. They are key molecules during inflammatory processes, and many studies are focusing on their regulatory functions in tumor growth and angiogenesis during metastatic cell seeding and spreading. Bindarit is an anti-inflammatory indazolic derivative that can inhibit the synthesis of MCP-1/CCL2, with a potential inhibitory function in tumor progression and metastasis formation. We show here that in vitro, bindarit can modulate cancer-cell proliferation and migration, mainly through negative regulation of TGF-beta and AKT signaling, and it can impair the NF-kappaB signaling pathway through enhancing the expression of the NF-kappaB inhibitor IkB-alpha. In vivo administration of bindarit results in impaired metastatic disease in prostate cancer xenograft mice (PC-3M-Luc2 cells injected intra-cardially) and impairment of local tumorigenesis in syngeneic Balb/c mice injected under the mammary gland with murine breast cancer cells (4T1-Luc cells). In addition, bindarit treatment significantly decreases the infiltration of tumor-associated macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells in 4T1-Luc primary tumors. Overall, our data indicate that bindarit is a good candidate for new therapies against prostate and breast tumorigenesis, with an action through impairment of inflammatory cell responses during formation of the tumor-stroma niche microenvironment.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22484917
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10489
      1. Author :
        Carlisle, R.; Seymour, L. W.; Coussios, C. C.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Pharm Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, B16-F10-luc-G5, B16F10-luc-G5, B16-F10-luc, B16F10-luc
      12. Abstract :
        PURPOSE: To improve the delivery of liposomes to tumors using P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL1) mediated binding to selectin molecules, which are upregulated on tumorassociated endothelium. METHODS: PSGL1 was orientated and presented on the surface of liposomes to achieve optimal selectin binding using a novel streptavidin-protein G linker molecule. Loading of PSGL1 liposomes with luciferin allowed their binding to e-selectin and activated HUVEC to be quantified in vitro and their stability, pharmacokinetics and tumor accumulation to be tested in vivo using murine models. RESULTS: PSGL1 liposomes showed 5-fold (p < 0.05) greater selectin binding than identically formulated control liposomes modified with ligand that did not contain the selectin binding domain. When added to HUVEC, PSGL1 liposomes showed >7-fold (p < 0.001) greater attachment than control liposomes. In in vivo studies PSGL1 liposomes showed similar stability and circulation to control liposomes but demonstrated a >3-fold enhancement in the level of delivery to tumors (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The technologies and strategies described here may contribute to clinical improvements in the selectivity and efficacy of liposomal drug delivery agents.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22992830
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 19
      15. Serial :
        10529
      1. Author :
        Neal K. Devaraj; Ralph Weissleder; Scott A. Hilderbrand
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Bioconjugate Chemistry
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        19
      8. Issue :
        12
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        in vivo labelling; breast cancer; in vivo imaging
      12. Abstract :
        Bioorthogonal tetrazine cycloadditions have been applied to live cell labeling. Tetrazines react irreversibly with the strained dienophile norbornene forming dihydropyrazine products and dinitrogen. The reaction is high yielding, selective, and fast in aqueous media. Her2/neu receptors on live human breast cancer cells were targeted with a monoclonal antibody modified with a norbornene. Tetrazines conjugated to a near-infrared fluorochrome selectively and rapidly label the pretargeted antibody in the presence of serum. These findings indicate that this chemistry is suitable for in vitro labeling experiments, and suggests that it may prove a useful strategy for in vivo pretargeted imaging under numerous modalities.
      13. URL :
        http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/bc8004446
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4499
      1. Author :
        Brand, A. M.; de Kwaadsteniet, M.; Dicks, L. M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Lett Appl Microbiol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        51
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen36, Xen 36, Staphylococcus aureus Xen36, IVIS, Animals; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Nisin/*pharmacology; Peritoneal Cavity/*microbiology; Staphylococcal Infections/*prevention & control; Staphylococcus aureus/*drug effects/growth & development
      12. Abstract :
        AIMS: To determine the ability of nisin F to control systematic infection caused by Staphylococcus aureus, using C57BL/6 mice as a model. METHODS AND RESULTS: Twelve mice were intraperitoneally injected with 1 x 10(8) viable cells of Staph. aureus Xen 36 containing the modified Photorhabdus luminescence luxABCDE operon on plasmid pAUL-A Tn4001. After 4 h, six mice were intraperitoneally injected with 640 arbitrary units (AU) nisin F, and six were injected with sterile saline. Six mice, not infected with Staph. aureus, were treated with nisin F, and six not infected were left untreated. The viability of Staph. aureus Xen 36 was monitored over 48 h by recording photon emission levels. Nisin F suppressed Staph. aureus for 15 min in vivo. No abnormalities were recorded in blood analyses and internal organs of mice treated with nisin F. CONCLUSIONS: Nisin F suppressed the growth of Staph. aureus in the peritoneal cavity for at least 15 min. Re-emergence of Staph. aureus bioluminescence over the next 44 h suggests that nisin F was inactivated, most probably by proteolytic enzymes. SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY: A single dosage of nisin F administered in the peritoneal cavity controlled the growth of Staph. aureus for at least 15 min in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21029139
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10410
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Microbes and infection / Institut Pasteur
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        10
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bacterial Proteins; Biofilms; Bioware; Catheterization, Central Venous; Male; Mice; Point Mutation; Sigma Factor; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Virulence; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        The impact of the alternative sigma factor sigma B (SigB) on pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus is not conclusively clarified. In this study, a central venous catheter (CVC) related model of multiorgan infection was used to investigate the role of SigB for the pathogenesis of S. aureus infections and biofilm formation in vivo. Analysis of two SigB-positive wild-type strains and their isogenic mutants revealed uniformly that the wild-type was significantly more virulent than the SigB-deficient mutant. The observed difference in virulence was apparently not linked to the capability of the strains to form biofilms in vivo since wild-type and mutant strains were able to produce biofilm layers inside of the catheter. The data strongly indicate that the alternative sigma factor SigB plays a role in CVC-associated infections caused by S. aureus.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18328762
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9046
      1. Author :
        Srivastava, Amit; Henneke, Philipp; Visintin, Alberto; Morse, Sarah C; Martin, Victoria; Watkins, Claire; Paton, James C; Wessels, Michael R; Golenbock, Douglas T; Malley, Richard
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Infection and immunity
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        73
      8. Issue :
        10
      9. Page Numbers :
        6479-6487
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Amino Acid Chloromethyl Ketones; Animals; Apoptosis; Bacterial Proteins; Caspases; Lipopolysaccharides; Macrophages; Mice; Mice, Inbred Strains; Nasopharynx; Pneumococcal Infections; Streptococcus pneumoniae; Streptolysins; Xen10
      12. Abstract :
        Pneumolysin, the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin of Streptococcus pneumoniae, induces inflammatory and apoptotic events in mammalian cells. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) confers resistance to pneumococcal infection via its interaction with pneumolysin, but the underlying mechanisms remain to be identified. In the present study, we found that pneumolysin-induced apoptosis is also mediated by TLR4 and confers protection against invasive disease. The interaction between TLR4 and pneumolysin is direct and specific; ligand-binding studies demonstrated that pneumolysin binds to TLR4 but not to TLR2. Involvement of TLR4 in pneumolysin-induced apoptosis was demonstrated in several complementary experiments. First, macrophages from wild-type mice were significantly more prone to pneumolysin-induced apoptosis than cells from TLR4-defective mice. In gain-of-function experiments, we found that epithelial cells expressing TLR4 and stimulated with pneumolysin were more likely to undergo apoptosis than cells expressing TLR2. A specific TLR4 antagonist, B1287, reduced pneumolysin-mediated apoptosis in wild-type cells. This apoptotic response was also partially caspase dependent as preincubation of cells with the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk reduced pneumolysin-induced apoptosis. Finally, in a mouse model of pneumococcal infection, pneumolysin-producing pneumococci elicited significantly more upper respiratory tract cell apoptosis in wild-type mice than in TLR4-defective mice, and blocking apoptosis by administration of zVAD-fmk to wild-type mice resulted in a significant increase in mortality following nasopharyngeal pneumococcal exposure. Overall, our results strongly suggest that protection against pneumococcal disease is dependent on the TLR4-mediated enhancement of pneumolysin-induced apoptosis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16177320
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        10001