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      1. Author :
        Mathew, B.; Jacobson, J. R.; Berdyshev, E.; Huang, Y.; Sun, X.; Zhao, Y.; Gerhold, L. M.; Siegler, J.; Evenoski, C.; Wang, T.; Zhou, T.; Zaidi, R.; Moreno-Vinasco, L.; Bittman, R.; Chen, C. T.; LaRiviere, P. J.; Sammani, S.; Lussier, Y. A.; Dudek, S. M.; Natarajan, V.; Weichselbaum, R. R.; Garcia, J. G.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Faseb J
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        25
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/chemistry; Ceramides/metabolism; Female; Gene Deletion; Gene Expression Regulation/physiology; Lung/*radiation effects; Lysophospholipids/*chemistry/*pharmacology; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; *Radiation Injuries, Experimental; Receptors, Lysosphingolipid/genetics/metabolism; Sphingolipids/*metabolism; Sphingosine/*analogs & derivatives/chemistry/pharmacology
      12. Abstract :
        Clinically significant radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common toxicity in patients administered thoracic radiotherapy. Although the molecular etiology is poorly understood, we previously characterized a murine model of RILI in which alterations in lung barrier integrity surfaced as a potentially important pathobiological event and genome-wide lung gene mRNA levels identified dysregulation of sphingolipid metabolic pathway genes. We hypothesized that sphingolipid signaling components serve as modulators and novel therapeutic targets of RILI. Sphingolipid involvement in murine RILI was confirmed by radiation-induced increases in lung expression of sphingosine kinase (SphK) isoforms 1 and 2 and increases in the ratio of ceramide to sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and dihydro-S1P (DHS1P) levels in plasma, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and lung tissue. Mice with a targeted deletion of SphK1 (SphK1(-/-)) or with reduced expression of S1P receptors (S1PR1(+/-), S1PR2(-/-), and S1PR3(-/-)) exhibited marked RILI susceptibility. Finally, studies of 3 potent vascular barrier-protective S1P analogs, FTY720, (S)-FTY720-phosphonate (fTyS), and SEW-2871, identified significant RILI attenuation and radiation-induced gene dysregulation by the phosphonate analog, fTyS (0.1 and 1 mg/kg i.p., 2x/wk) and to a lesser degree by SEW-2871 (1 mg/kg i.p., 2x/wk), compared with those in controls. These results support the targeting of S1P signaling as a novel therapeutic strategy in RILI.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21712494
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 18
      15. Serial :
        10371
      1. Author :
        Pan, Y.; Zhong, L. J.; Zhou, H.; Wang, X.; Chen, K.; Yang, H. P.; Xiaokaiti, Y.; Maimaiti, A.; Jiang, L.; Li, X. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Acta Pharmacol Sin
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        33
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, B16-F10-luc-G5, B16F10-luc-G5, B16-F10-luc, B16F10-luc, 14-3-3 Proteins/*genetics; Animals; Anticoagulants/pharmacology/*therapeutic use; Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology/*therapeutic use; Apoptosis/drug effects; Cadherins/genetics; Cell Cycle/drug effects; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Proliferation/*drug effects; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/drug effects; Heparin/pharmacology/*therapeutic use; Humans; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Metastasis/drug therapy/genetics; Neoplasms/*drug therapy/genetics; Prostate/drug effects/metabolism; Prostatic Neoplasms/drug therapy/genetics; Transforming Growth Factor beta/genetics; Vimentin/*genetics
      12. Abstract :
        AIM: To investigate the inhibitory effects of heparin on PC-3M cells proliferation in vitro and B16-F10-luc-G5 cells metastasis in Balb/c nude mice and identify the protein expression patterns to elucidate the action mechanism of heparin. METHODS: Human prostate cancer PC-3M cells were incubated with heparin 0.5 to 125 mug/mL for 24 h. The proliferation of PC-3M cells was assessed by MTS assay. BrdU incoporation and Ki67 expression were detected using a high content screening (HCS) assay. The cell cycle and apoptosis of PC-3M cells were tested by flow cytometry. B16-F10-luc-G5 cardinoma cells were injected into the lateral tail vein of 6-week old male Balb/c nude mice and heparin 30 mg/kg was administered iv 30 min before and 24 h after injection. The metasis of B16-F10-luc-G5 cells was detected by bioluminescence assay. Activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and hemorheological parameters were measured on d 14 after injection of B16-F10-luc-G5 carcinoma cells in Balb/c mice. The global protein changes in PC-3M cells and frozen lung tissues from mice burdened with B16-F10-luc-G5 cells were determined by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and image analysis. The protein expression of vimentin and 14-3-3 zeta/delta was measured by Western blot. The mRNA transcription of vimentin, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta, E-cadherin, and alpha(v)-integrin was measured by RT-PCR. RESULTS: Heparin 25 and 125 mug/mL significantly inhibited the proliferation, arrested the cells in G(1) phase, and suppressed BrdU incorporation and Ki67 expression in PC-3M cells compared with the model group. But it had no significant effect on apoptosis of PC-3M cells. Heparin 30 mg/kg markedly inhibits the metastasis of B16-F10-luc-G5 cells on day 8. Additionally, heparin administration maintained relatively normal red blood hematocrit but had no influence on APTT in nude mice burdened with B16-F10-luc-G5 cells. Thirty of down-regulated protein spots were identified after heparin treatment, many of which are related to tumor development, extracellular signaling, energy metabolism, and cellular proliferation. Vimentin and 14-3-3 zeta/delta were identified in common in PC-3M cells and the lungs of mice bearing B16-F10-luc-G5 carcinoma cells. Heparin 25 and 125 mug/mL decreased the protein expression of vimentin and 14-3-3 zeta/delta and the mRNA expression of alpha(v)-integrin. Heparin 125 mug/mL decreased vimentin and E-cadherin mRNA transcription while increased TGF-beta mRNA transcription in the PC-3M cells, but the differences were not significant. Transfection of vimentin-targeted siRNA for 48 h significantly decreased the BrdU incoporation and Ki67 expression in PC-3M cells. CONCLUSION: Heparin inhibited PC-3M cell proliferation in vitro and B16-F10-luc-G5 cells metastasis in nude mice by inhibition of vimentin, 14-3-3 zeta/delta, and alpha(v)-integrin expression.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22669117
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 13
      15. Serial :
        10534
      1. Author :
        Vandamme, M.; Robert, E.; Lerondel, S.; Sarron, V.; Ries, D.; Dozias, S.; Sobilo, J.; Gosset, D.; Kieda, C.; Legrain, B.; Pouvesle, J. M.; Pape, A. L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Int J Cancer
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        U87-MG-luc2, U-87-MG-luc2, U87MG-luc2, Bioluminescence, Glioma, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        Non-thermal plasma (NTP) is generated by ionizing neutral gas molecules/atoms leading to a highly reactive gas at ambient temperature containing excited molecules, reactive species and generating transient electric fields. Given its potential to interact with tissue or cells without a significant temperature increase, NTP appears as a promising approach for the treatment of various diseases including cancer. The aim of our study was to evaluate the interest of NTP both in vitro and in vivo. To this end, we evaluated the antitumor activity of NTP in vitro on two human cancer cell lines (glioblastoma U87MG and colorectal carcinoma HCT-116). Our data showed that NTP generated a large amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to the formation of DNA damages. This resulted in a multiphase cell cycle arrest and a subsequent apoptosis induction. In addition, in vivo experiments on U87MG bearing mice showed that NTP induced a reduction of bioluminescence and tumor volume as compared to nontreated mice. An induction of apoptosis was also observed together with an accumulation of cells in S phase of the cell cycle suggesting an arrest of tumor proliferation. In conclusion, we demonstrated here that the potential of NTP to generate ROS renders this strategy particularly promising in the context of tumor treatment.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21702038
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10424
      1. Author :
        Vandamme, M.; Robert, E.; Lerondel, S.; Sarron, V.; Ries, D.; Dozias, S.; Sobilo, J.; Gosset, D.; Kieda, C.; Legrain, B.; Pouvesle, J. M.; Pape, A. L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Int J Cancer
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        HCT-116-luc2, IVIS, Bioware, HCT116-luc2
      12. Abstract :
        Non-thermal plasma (NTP) is generated by ionizing neutral gas molecules/atoms leading to a highly reactive gas at ambient temperature containing excited molecules, reactive species and generating transient electric fields. Given its potential to interact with tissue or cells without a significant temperature increase, NTP appears as a promising approach for the treatment of various diseases including cancer. The aim of our study was to evaluate the interest of NTP both in vitro and in vivo. To this end, we evaluated the antitumor activity of NTP in vitro on two human cancer cell lines (glioblastoma U87MG and colorectal carcinoma HCT-116). Our data showed that NTP generated a large amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to the formation of DNA damages. This resulted in a multiphase cell cycle arrest and a subsequent apoptosis induction. In addition, in vivo experiments on U87MG bearing mice showed that NTP induced a reduction of bioluminescence and tumor volume as compared to nontreated mice. An induction of apoptosis was also observed together with an accumulation of cells in S phase of the cell cycle suggesting an arrest of tumor proliferation. In conclusion, we demonstrated here that the potential of NTP to generate ROS renders this strategy particularly promising in the context of tumor treatment.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21702038
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10498
      1. Author :
        Nowatzki, P. J.; Koepsel, R. R.; Stoodley, P.; Min, K.; Harper, A.; Murata, H.; Donfack, J.; Hortelano, E. R.; Ehrlich, G. D.; Russell, A. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Acta Biomater
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        8
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen14, Xen 14, E. coli Xen14, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        Biofilm-associated infections are a major complication of implanted and indwelling medical devices like urological and venous catheters. They commonly persist even in the presence of an oral or intravenous antibiotic regimen, often resulting in chronic illness. We have developed a new approach to inhibiting biofilm growth on synthetic materials through controlled release of salicylic acid from a polymeric coating. Herein we report the synthesis and testing of a ultraviolet-cured polyurethane acrylate polymer composed, in part, of salicyl acrylate, which hydrolyzes upon exposure to aqueous conditions, releasing salicylic acid while leaving the polymer backbone intact. The salicylic acid release rate was tuned by adjusting the polymer composition. Anti-biofilm performance of the coatings was assessed under several biofilm forming conditions using a novel combination of the MBEC Assay biofilm multi-peg growth system and bioluminescence monitoring for live cell quantification. Films of the salicylic acid-releasing polymers were found to inhibit biofilm formation, as shown by bioluminescent and GFP reporter strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. Urinary catheters coated on their inner lumens with the salicylic acid-releasing polymer significantly reduced biofilm formation by E. coli for up to 5 days under conditions that simulated physiological urine flow.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22342353
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10394
      1. Author :
        Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Iguchi, Haruhisa; Yoshioka, Yusuke; Takeshita, Fumitaka; Matsuki, Yasushi; Ochiya, Takahiro
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        The Journal of biological chemistry
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        285
      8. Issue :
        23
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aniline Compounds; Animals; Benzylidene Compounds; Biological Transport; Bioware; Cercopithecus aethiops; COS Cells; Culture Media, Conditioned; Exosomes; Gene Silencing; Humans; MicroRNAs; Neoplasms; PC-3M-luc; RNA Interference; RNA, Small Interfering; Sphingomyelin Phosphodiesterase; Tumor Markers, Biological
      12. Abstract :
        The existence of circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) in the blood of cancer patients has raised the possibility that miRNAs may serve as a novel diagnostic marker. However, the secretory mechanism and biological function of extracellular miRNAs remain unclear. Here, we show that miRNAs are released through a ceramide-dependent secretory machinery and that the secretory miRNAs are transferable and functional in the recipient cells. Ceramide, whose biosynthesis is regulated by neutral sphingomyelinase 2 (nSMase2), triggers secretion of small membrane vesicles called exosomes. The decreased activity of nSMase2 with a chemical inhibitor, GW4869, and a specific small interfering RNA resulted in the reduced secretion of miRNAs. Complementarily, overexpression of nSMase2 increased extracellular amounts of miRNAs. We also revealed that the endosomal sorting complex required for transport system is unnecessary for the release of miRNAs. Furthermore, a tumor-suppressive miRNA secreted via this pathway was transported between cells and exerted gene silencing in the recipient cells, thereby leading to cell growth inhibition. Our findings shed a ray of light on the physiological relevance of secretory miRNAs.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20353945
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8946
      1. Author :
        Evans, L.; Williams, A.S.; Hayes, A.J.; Jones, S.A.; Nowell, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Arthritis and Rheumatism
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Apo866; Arthritis; In vivo; Living Image software; MMPSense 750 FAST; Xenogen Caliper IVIS 200
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVE: Using APO866, studies assessed the ability of Pre-B-cell colony-Enhancing Factor (PBEF) to regulate inflammatory and degradative processes in fibroblasts and collagen-induced arthritis. METHODS: ELISAs were used to examine regulation of metalloproteinases and chemokine expression by HFF fibroblasts. PBEF was further examined in the collagen-induced arthritis model using APO866. Disease activity was assessed using radiography, histology, in vivo imaging and quantitative PCR (qPCR). RESULTS: In vitro activation of fibroblasts with PBEF promoted MMP-3, CCL-2 and CXCL-8 expression, an effect inhibited by APO866. Early intervention with APO866 in collagen-induced arthritis inhibited both synovial inflammation, including chemokine-directed leukocyte infiltration, and the systemic marker of inflammation, serum hyaluronic acid. Blockade of degenerative processes by APO866 was further illustrated by the reduced expression of MMP-3 and MMP-13 in joint extracts and reduction of the systemic marker of cartilage erosion, serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). Radiology showed that APO866 protected against bone erosion, whilst qPCR demonstrated inhibition of RANKL expression. APO866 treatment in established disease (clinical score >=5) reduced synovial inflammation, cartilage destruction and halted bone erosion. MMP-3, CCL-2 and RANKL activity, as assessed by in vivo imaging with MMPSense750 and qPCR were reduced in treated animals. qPCR of synovial explants from animals with CIA showed that APO866 inhibited MMP-3, CCL-2 and RANKL production, a result that was reversed with nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) CONCLUSIONS: These data confirm PBEF to be an important regulator of inflammation, cartilage catabolism and bone erosion, and highlights APO866 as a promising therapy for targeting PBEF activity in inflammatory arthritis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21400478
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 8551
      15. Serial :
        4800
      1. Author :
        Zuluaga, M. F.; Sekkat, N.; Gabriel, D.; van den Bergh, H.; Lange, N.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Mol Cancer Ther
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        PC-3M-luc-C6, PC-3M-luc, IVIS, Bioware, Prostate cancer, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        Frequent side effects of radical treatment modalities and the availability of novel diagnostics have raised the interest in focal therapies for localized prostate cancer. To improve the selectivity and therapeutic efficacy of such therapies, we developed a minimally invasive procedure, based on a novel polymeric photosensitizer prodrug sensitive to urokinase-like plasminogen activator (uPA). The compound is inactive in its prodrug form and accumulates passively at the tumor site by the enhanced permeability and retention effect. There, the prodrug is selectively converted to its photoactive form by uPA which is over-expressed by prostate cancer cells. Irradiation of the activated photosensitizer exerts a tumor-selective phototoxic effect. The prodrug alone (8 microM) showed no toxic effect on PC-3 cells, but upon irradiation the cell viability was reduced by 90%. In vivo, after systemic administration of the prodrug, PC-3 xenografts became selectively fluorescent. This is indicative of the prodrug accumulation in the tumor and selective local enzymatic activation. Qualitative analysis of the activated compound confirmed that the enzymatic cleavage occurred selectively in the tumor, with only trace amounts in the neighboring skin or muscle. Subsequent photodynamic therapy studies demonstrated complete tumor eradication of animals treated with light (150 J/cm2 at 665 nm) 16 hours after the injection of the prodrug (7.5 mg/kg). These promising results evidence the excellent selectivity of our prodrug with the potential to be used for both, imaging and therapy of localized prostate cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23270928
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 5
      15. Serial :
        10542
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