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      1. Author :
        Wen, D.; Qing, L.; Harrison, G.; Golub, E.; Akintoye, S. O.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Oral Dis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        17
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        427-32
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, Maestro, Animals; Bone Density Conservation Agents/administration & dosage/*pharmacokinetics; Bone and Bones/*metabolism; Calcium/metabolism; Chelating Agents; Decalcification Technique; Diphosphonates/administration & dosage/*pharmacokinetics; Durapatite/metabolism; Edetic Acid; Female; Femur/metabolism; Fibula/metabolism; Fluorescent Dyes/diagnostic use; Fluorometry; Humerus/metabolism; Injections, Intravenous; Mandible/metabolism; Models, Animal; Radius/metabolism; Rats; Rats, Nude; Spectrophotometry, Atomic; Tibia/metabolism; Tissue Distribution; Ulna/metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVES: Bisphosphonates commonly used to treat osteoporosis, Paget's disease, multiple myeloma, hypercalcemia of malignancy and osteolytic lesions of cancer metastasis have been associated with bisphosphonate-associated jaw osteonecrosis (BJON). The underlying pathogenesis of BJON is unclear, but disproportionate bisphosphonate concentration in the jaw has been proposed as one potential etiological factor. This study tested the hypothesis that skeletal biodistribution of intravenous bisphosphonate is anatomic site-dependent in a rat model system. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fluorescently labeled pamidronate was injected intravenously in athymic rats of equal weights followed by in vivo whole body fluorimetry, ex vivo optical imaging of oral, axial, and appendicular bones and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid bone decalcification to assess hydroxyapatite-bound bisphosphonate. RESULTS: Bisphosphonate uptake and bisphosphonate released per unit calcium were similar in oral and appendicular bones but lower than those in axial bones. Hydroxyapatite-bound bisphosphonate liberated by sequential acid decalcification was the highest in oral, relative to axial and appendicular bones (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates regional differences in uptake and release of bisphosphonate from oral, axial, and appendicular bones of immune deficient rats.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21122034
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 11
      15. Serial :
        10467
      1. Author :
        Blagbrough, Ian S; Zara, Chiara
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Pharmaceutical research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        26
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Cats; Cattle; Disease Models, Animal; Dna; Dogs; Drug Delivery Systems; Female; Fishes; Gene Therapy; Horses; Humans; Mice; PC-3M-luc; Pregnancy; Primates; Rats; RNA, Small Interfering; Sheep; Swine
      12. Abstract :
        Nanoparticles, including lipopolyamines leading to lipoplexes, liposomes, and polyplexes are targeted drug carrier systems in the current search for a successful delivery system for polynucleic acids. This review is focused on the impact of gene and siRNA delivery for studies of efficacy, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacokinetics within the setting of the wide variety of in vivo animal models now used. This critical appraisal of the recent literature sets out the different models that are currently being investigated to bridge from studies in cell lines through towards clinical reality. Whilst many scientists will be familiar with rodent (murine, fecine, cricetine, and musteline) models, few probably think of fish as a clinically relevant animal model, but zebrafish, madake, and rainbow trout are all being used. Larger animal models include rabbit, cat, dog, and cow. Pig is used both for the prevention of foot-and-mouth disease and human diseases, sheep is a model for corneal transplantation, and the horse naturally develops arthritis. Non-human primate models (macaque, common marmoset, owl monkey) are used for preclinical gene vector safety and efficacy trials to bridge the gap prior to clinical studies. We aim for the safe development of clinically effective delivery systems for DNA and RNAi technologies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18841450
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8965
      1. Author :
        Woods, Nicholas T; Yamaguchi, Hirohito; Lee, Francis Y; Bhalla, Kapil N; Wang, Hong-Gang
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Cancer research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        67
      8. Issue :
        22
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anoikis; Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins; bcl-2-Associated X Protein; Bioware; Caspase 3; Cell Line, Tumor; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic; Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3; Humans; L-Lactate Dehydrogenase; MDA-MB-231-D3H2LN cells; Membrane Proteins; Mice; Neoplasm Metastasis; Neoplasm Proteins; NIH 3T3 Cells; Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases; Proto-Oncogene Proteins; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2
      12. Abstract :
        Anoikis, a Bax-dependent apoptosis triggered by detachment from the extracellular matrix, is often dysfunctional in metastatic cancer cells. Using wild-type and c-Src-transformed NIH3T3 cells as a model, we identified Mcl-1 degradation and Bim up-regulation as a critical determinant of anoikis initiation. Detachment rapidly degraded Mcl-1 via a GSK-3beta-dependent proteasomal pathway and transcriptionally up-regulated Bim expression. Mcl-1 degradation in the presence of Bim was sufficient to induce anoikis. By analyzing nonmetastatic Saos-2 and metastatic derivative LM7 cells, we confirmed that dysregulation of Mcl-1 degradation and Bim induction during detachment contributes to decreased anoikis sensitivity of metastatic cells. Furthermore, knockdown of Mcl-1 or pharmacologic inhibition of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways that suppress Mcl-1 degradation and Bim expression could markedly sensitize metastatic breast cancer cells to anoikis and prevent metastases in vivo. Therefore, Mcl-1 degradation primes the cell for Bax activation and anoikis, which can be blocked by oncogenic signaling in metastatic cells.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18006817
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8959
      1. Author :
        Ketonis, C.; Barr, S.; Shapiro, I. M.; Parvizi, J.; Adams, C. S.; Hickok, N. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Bone
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        48
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen36, Xen 36, Staphylococcus aureus Xen36, IVIS, Adsorption/drug effects; Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry/*pharmacology; Biological Markers/metabolism; *Bone Transplantation; Cell Differentiation/drug effects; Cell Shape/drug effects; Cells, Cultured; Colony Count, Microbial; Drug Stability; Fetus/cytology; Fluorescence; Gene Expression Profiling; Humans; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Osteoblasts/cytology/drug effects/metabolism; Phenotype; Time Factors; Transplantation, Homologous; Vancomycin/chemistry/*pharmacology
      12. Abstract :
        Bacterial contamination of bone allograft is a significant complication of orthopedic surgery. To address this issue, we have engineered a method for covalently modifying bone allograft tissue with the antibiotic vancomycin. The goal of this investigation was to compare the biocidal properties of this new allograft material with those of vancomycin physisorbed onto graft material. The duration of antibiotic release from the vancomycin-modified allograft matrix was determined, and no elution was observed. In contrast, the adsorbed antibiotic showed a peak elution at 24h that then decreased over several days. We next used an Staphylococcus aureus disk diffusion assay to measure the activity of the eluted vancomycin. Again we found that no active antibiotic was eluted from the covalently modified allograft. Similarly, when the vancomycin-modified allograft morsel was used in the assay, no measurable elution was observed; amounts of antibiotic released from the adsorbed samples inhibited S. aureus growth for 4-7 days. Probably the most telling property of the allograft was that after 2 weeks, the tethered allograft was able to resist bacterial colonization. Unlike the elution system in which vancomycin was depleted over the course of days-weeks, the antibiotic on the allograft was stably bound even after 300 days, while its biocidal activity remained undiminished for 60 days. This finding was in stark contrast to the antibiotic impregnated allograft, which was readily colonized by bacteria. Finally we chose to evaluate three indicators of cell function: expression of a key transcription factor, expression of selected transcripts, and assessment of cell morphology. Since the tethered antibiotic appeared to have little or no effect on any of these activities, it was concluded that the stable, tethered antibiotic prevented bacterial infection while not modifying bone cell function.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21035576
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 7
      15. Serial :
        10407
      1. Author :
        Leszczynska, K.; Namiot, D.; Byfield, F. J.; Cruz, K.; Zendzian-Piotrowska, M.; Fein, D. E.; Savage, P. B.; Diamond, S.; McCulloch, C. A.; Janmey, P. A.; Bucki, R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Antimicrob Chemother
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen5, Xen 5, Pseudomonas aeruginosa
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVES: We aim to develop antibacterial peptide mimics resistant to protease degradation, with broad-spectrum activity at sites of infection. METHODS: The bactericidal activities of LL-37, ceragenins CSA-13, CSA-90 and CSA-92 and the spermine-conjugated dexamethasone derivative D2S were evaluated using MIC and MBC measurements. Gingival fibroblast counting, interleukin-8 (IL-8) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release from keratinocytes (HaCat) were used to determine effects on cell growth, pro-inflammatory response and toxicity. RESULTS: All tested cationic lipids showed stronger bactericidal activity than LL-37. Incubation of Staphylococcus aureus with half the MIC of LL-37 led to the appearance of bacteria resistant to its bactericidal effects, but identical incubations with CSA-13 or D2S did not produce resistant bacteria. Cathelicidin LL-37 significantly increased the total number of gingival fibroblasts, but ceragenins and D2S did not alter gingival fibroblast growth. Cationic lipids showed no toxicity to HaCat cells at concentrations resulting in bacterial killing. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that cationic lipids such as ceragenins warrant further testing as potential novel antibacterial agents.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23134677
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10551
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2006
      5. Publication :
        Blood
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        108
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Adoptive Transfer; Animals; Antigen Presentation; Autoantigens; B16-F10-luc-G5 cells; Bioware; Cancer Vaccines; dendritic cells; Endosomes; Lymphocyte Activation; Lymphoma; Mice; Mice, Knockout; T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer; T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory; Vaccination
      12. Abstract :
        Lymphoma cells are malignant cells of the T- or B-cell lineage that often express many surface markers inappropriately, yet are not recognized as abnormal by the immune system. We modeled this situation by inoculating ovalbumin-expressing E.G7-OVA lymphoma cells into mice that expressed ovalbumin as a self antigen in pancreatic islets, and investigated the efficacy of dendritic cell (DC) vaccination in these mice. Although vaccination with DC-expressing ovalbumin induced strong cytotoxic T-cell immunity, which led to clearance of E.G7-OVA lymphoma cells in naive C57BL/6 mice, DC vaccination was ineffective in mice expressing ovalbumin as a self antigen. Antigen modification to increase its processing via the endosomal processing pathway dramatically increased CD4 T-cell activation but paradoxically, impaired the protective effect of DC vaccination even in naive mice. Depletion of CD25(+) T cells (regulatory T cells [Tregs]) prior to vaccination restored the efficacy of DC vaccination and allowed eradication of lymphoma also in mice expressing ovalbumin as a self antigen. We conclude that lymphoma cells may be eradicated using DC vaccination if activation of CD25(+) Tregs is simultaneously inhibited, and that intentionally enhanced endosomal antigen processing in DC vaccines may shift the balance from CD4 T-cell help toward stimulation of Tregs.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16621963
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9002
      1. Author :
        Engelsman, Anton F; Krom, Bastiaan P; Busscher, Henk J; van Dam, Gooitzen M; Ploeg, Rutger J; van der Mei, Henny C
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Acta biomaterialia
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bioware; Connective Tissue; Diffusion; Drug Implants; Female; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Nitric Oxide; Polyvinyls; Prostheses and Implants; pXen-5; Staphylococcal Infections; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Infection of surgical meshes used in abdominal wall reconstructions often leads to removal of the implant and increases patient morbidity due to repetitive operations and hospital administrations. Treatment with antibiotics is ineffective due to the biofilm mode of growth of the infecting bacteria and bears the risk of inducing antibiotic resistance. Hence there is a need for alternative methods to prevent and treat mesh infection. Nitric oxide (NO)-releasing coatings have been demonstrated to possess bactericidal properties in vitro. It is the aim of this study to assess possible benefits of a low concentration NO-releasing carbon-based coating on monofilament polypropylene meshes with respect to infection control in vitro and in vivo. When applied on surgical meshes, NO-releasing coatings showed significant bactericidal effect on in vitro biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and CNS. However, using bioluminescent in vivo imaging, no beneficial effects of this NO-releasing coating on subcutaneously implanted surgical meshes in mice could be observed.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19251498
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9019
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Lasers in surgery and medicine
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        39
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Anti-Infective Agents; Biofilms; Dental Pulp Cavity; Dental Pulp Diseases; Endodontics; Humans; Luminescence; Photochemotherapy; Polyethyleneimine; Porphyrins; Proteus Infections; Proteus mirabilis; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Pseudomonas Infections; Xen5; Xen44
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE To compare the effectiveness of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT), standard endodontic treatment and the combined treatment to eliminate bacterial biofilms present in infected root canals. STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND METHODS Ten single-rooted freshly extracted human teeth were inoculated with stable bioluminescent Gram-negative bacteria, Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to form 3-day biofilms in prepared root canals. Bioluminescence imaging was used to serially quantify bacterial burdens. PDT employed a conjugate between polyethylenimine and chlorin(e6) as the photosensitizer (PS) and 660-nm diode laser light delivered into the root canal via a 200-micro fiber, and this was compared and combined with standard endodontic treatment using mechanical debridement and antiseptic irrigation. RESULTS Endodontic therapy alone reduced bacterial bioluminescence by 90% while PDT alone reduced bioluminescence by 95%. The combination reduced bioluminescence by >98%, and importantly the bacterial regrowth observed 24 hours after treatment was much less for the combination (P<0.0005) than for either single treatment. CONCLUSIONS Bioluminescence imaging is an efficient way to monitor endodontic therapy. Antimicrobial PDT may have a role to play in optimized endodontic therapy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17066481
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9997
      1. Author :
        Lemarie, F.; Chang, C. W.; Blatchford, D. R.; Amor, R.; Norris, G.; Tetley, L.; McConnell, G.; Dufes, C.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Nanomedicine (Lond)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, B16-F10-luc-G5, B16F10-luc-G5, B16-F10-luc, B16F10-luc
      12. Abstract :
        Aim: The therapeutic potential of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a green tea polyphenol with anticancer properties, is limited by its inability to specifically reach tumors following intravenous administration. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a tumor-targeted vesicular formulation of EGCG would suppress the growth of A431 epidermoid carcinoma and B16-F10 melanoma in vitro and in vivo. Materials & methods: Transferrin-bearing vesicles encapsulating EGCG were administered intravenously to mice bearing subcutaneous A431 and B16-F10 tumors. Results: The intravenous administration of EGCG encapsulated in transferrin-bearing vesicles resulted in tumor suppression in 40% of A431 and B16-F10 tumors. Animal survival was improved by more than 20 days compared with controls. Conclusion: Encapsulation of EGCG in transferrin-bearing vesicles is a promising therapeutic strategy. Original submitted 28 November 2011; Revised submitted 11 May 2012.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22891867
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 14
      15. Serial :
        10532
      1. Author :
        Daugimont, L.; Vandermeulen, G.; Defresne, F.; Bouzin, C.; Mir, L. M.; Bouquet, C.; Feron, O.; Preat, V.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Eur J Pharm Biopharm
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        78
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        B16-F10-luc-G5, B16F10-luc-G5, B16-F10-luc, B16F10-luc, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: Despite the discovery of novel inhibitors of tumor angiogenesis, protein-based antiangiogenic cancer therapy suffers some limitations that antiangiogenic gene therapy could overcome. We investigated whether intra-tumoral electrotransfer of three angiogenic plasmids could inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. METHODS: Plasmids encoding recombinant disintegrin domain of ADAM-15 (RDD), thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1), and the soluble isoform of the VEGF receptor 1 (sFlt-1) were injected into B16F10 melanoma-bearing C57BL/6 mice followed by electroporation. Tumor volume was measured daily using a digital caliper. Metastasis was monitored by in vivo bioluminescence after surgical removal of the primary luciferase-encoding B16F10 tumor 5 days after intra-tumoral electrotransfer. Markers of vascularization and cell proliferation were quantified by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Intra-tumoral electrotransfer of the antiangiogenic plasmids induced a significant inhibition of tumor growth, doubling of mean survival time and long-term survivors ( approximately 40% vs 0% in control). When the tumor was removed by surgery after intra-tumoral plasmid electrotransfer, a significant decrease in tumor metastasis was observed leading to long-term tumor-free survival especially after treatment with pRDD plasmid (84% vs 0% in control). Unlike pTSP-1 and psFlt-1, pRDD significantly decreased cell proliferation in B16F10 primary tumors which express alphavbeta3 and alpha5beta1 integrins. No effect of antiangiogenic plasmid electrotransfer on normal skin blood flow was detected. CONCLUSION: The intra-tumoral electrotransfer of the three antiangiogenic plasmids is a promising method for the treatment of melanoma. The plasmid encoding RDD seems to be particularly effective due to its direct antitumoral activity combined with angiogenesis suppression, and its marked inhibition of metastasis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21316447
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 12
      15. Serial :
        10353
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