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      1. Author :
        Kuklin, Nelly A; Pancari, Gregory D; Tobery, Timothy W; Cope, Leslie; Jackson, Jesse; Gill, Charles; Overbye, Karen; Francis, Kevin P; Yu, Jun; Montgomery, Donna; Anderson, Annaliesa S; McClements, William; Jansen, Kathrin U
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2003
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        47
      8. Issue :
        9
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Abscess; Acetamides; Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bioware; Catheterization; Colony Count, Microbial; Dose-Response Relationship, Drug; Female; Foreign Bodies; Luminescent Measurements; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Muscle, Skeletal; Oxazolidinones; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Thigh; Time Factors; Wound Infection; Xen8.1
      12. Abstract :
        Staphylococcal infections associated with catheter and prosthetic implants are difficult to eradicate and often lead to chronic infections. Development of novel antibacterial therapies requires simple, reliable, and relevant models for infection. Using bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus, we have adapted the existing foreign-body and deep-wound mouse models of staphylococcal infection to allow real-time monitoring of the bacterial colonization of catheters or tissues. This approach also enables kinetic measurements of bacterial growth and clearance in each infected animal. Persistence of infection was observed throughout the course of the study until termination of the experiment at day 16 in a deep-wound model and day 21 in the foreign-body model, providing sufficient time to test the effects of antibacterial compounds. The usefulness of both animal models was assessed by using linezolid as a test compound and comparing bioluminescent measurements to bacterial counts. In the foreign-body model, a three-dose antibiotic regimen (2, 5, and 24 h after infection) resulted in a decrease in both luminescence and bacterial counts recovered from the implant compared to those of the mock-treated infected mice. In addition, linezolid treatment prevented the formation of subcutaneous abscesses, although it did not completely resolve the infection. In the thigh model, the same treatment regimen resulted in complete resolution of the luminescent signal, which correlated with clearance of the bacteria from the thighs.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12936968
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9992
      1. Author :
        Xing, H. R.; Zhang, Q.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Methods Mol Biol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        872
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense, Animals; Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Female; Mammary Neoplasms, Animal/metabolism/pathology; Mice; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Transplantation; Neovascularization, Pathologic/drug therapy/*pathology
      12. Abstract :
        In vivo angiogenesis assays provide more physiologically relevant information about tumor vascularization than in vitro studies because they take the complex interactions among cancer cells, endothelial cells, mural cells, and tumor stroma into consideration. Traditional microscopic assessment of vascular density conducted by immunostaining of tissue sections or by lectin angiogram visualization of tumor vessels is invasive and requires the sacrifice of tumor-bearing animals. Therefore, it prohibits longitudinal time-course observation in a single animal and requires a large number of animals at each time point to derive statistically-meaningful observations. Additionally, heterogenous behavior among different tumors will inevitably introduce individual biological variance that may obscure reliable interpretation of the results. While various artificial in vivo angiogenesis assays, such as the Matrigel implant assay, chick chorioallatoic membrane assay, and dorsal skin fold chamber assay have been developed and employed to more directly observe the progression of physiological angiogenesis, they can not appropriately assess tumor angiogenic progression or tumor vascular regression in response to therapeutic intervention. Here, we describe a noninvasive method and a detailed protocol that we have developed and optimized using the Olympus OV-100 in vivo imaging system for real-time high-resolution visualization and assessment of tumor angiogenesis and vascular response to anticancer therapies in live animals. We show that using this approach, tumor vessels can be monitored longitudinally through the whole vasculogenesis and angiogenesis process in the same mouse. Further, morphologic changes of the same vessel prior to and after drug treatments can be captured with microscopic high resolution. Moreover, the multichannel co-imaging capability of the OV-100 allows us to analyze and compare tumor vessel permeability before and after antiangiogenesis therapy by employing a near-infrared blood pool reagent, or by visualizing improved cytotoxic drug delivery upon tumor vessel normalization by using a fluorophore tagged drug. This noninvasive method can be readily applied to orthotopically transplanted breast cancer models as well as to subcutaneously-transplanted tumor models.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22700407
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10443
      1. Author :
        Malley, R.; Henneke, P.; Morse, S. C.; Cieslewicz, M. J.; Lipsitch, M.; Thompson, C. M.; Kurt-Jones, E.; Paton, J. C.; Wessels, M. R.; Golenbock, D. T.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2003
      5. Publication :
        Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        100
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen, Xen10
      12. Abstract :
        Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the leading causes of invasive bacterial disease worldwide. Fragments of the cell wall and the cytolytic toxin pneumolysin have been shown to contribute substantially to inflammatory damage, although the interactions between pneumococcal components and host-cell structures have not been elucidated completely. Results of a previous study indicated that cell-wall components of pneumococci are recognized by Toll-like receptor (TLR)2 but suggested that pneumolysin induces inflammatory events independently of this receptor. In this study we tested the hypothesis that pneumolysin interacts with surface proteins of the TLR family other than TLR2. We found that pneumolysin stimulates tumor necrosis factor-? and IL-6 release in wild-type macrophages but not in macrophages from mice with a targeted deletion of the cytoplasmic TLR-adapter molecule myeloid differentiation factor 88, suggesting the involvement of the TLRs in pneumolysin recognition. Purified pneumolysin synergistically activated macrophage responses together with preparations of pneumococcal cell walls or staphylococcal peptidoglycan, which are known to activate TLR2. Furthermore, when compared with wild-type macrophages, macrophages from mice that carry a spontaneous mutation in TLR4 (P712H) were hyporesponsive to both pneumolysin alone and the combination of pneumolysin with pneumococcal cell walls. Finally, these TLR4-mutant mice were significantly more susceptible to lethal infection after intranasal colonization with pneumolysin-positive pneumococci than were control mice. We conclude that the interaction of pneumolysin with TLR4 is critically involved in the innate immune response to pneumococcus.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12569171
      14. Call Number :
        140854
      15. Serial :
        7487
      1. Author :
        Kadurugamuwa, J. L.; Modi, K.; Coquoz, O.; Rice, B.; Smith, S.; Contag, P. R.; Purchio, T.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Infection and Immunity
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        73
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen, Xen10
      12. Abstract :
        We developed a method for simultaneous in vivo biophotonic monitoring of pneumococcal meningitis and the accompanying neuronal injury in live transgenic mice. Streptococcus pneumoniae engineered for bioluminescence (lux) was used for direct visualization of disease progression and antibiotic treatment in a mouse model of meningitis. The host response was monitored in transgenic mice containing an inducible firefly luciferase (luc) reporter gene under transcriptional control of the mouse glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) promoter. Based on the different spectra of light emission and substrate requirements for lux and luc, we were able to separately monitor the two reporters using a highly sensitive in vivo imaging system. The level of neuronal damage and recovery following antibiotic treatment was dependent on the time of treatment. This model has potential for simultaneous multiparameter monitoring and testing of therapies that target the pathogen or host response to prevent neuronal injury and recovery.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16299273
      14. Call Number :
        139327
      15. Serial :
        7497
      1. Author :
        Johnson, J. L.; Pillai, S.; Pernazza, D.; Sebti, S. M.; Lawrence, N. J.; Chellappan, S. P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        72
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        A549-luc-C8, A549-luc, IVIS, Bioware, Animals; Breast Neoplasms/genetics/metabolism/pathology; Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/genetics/metabolism/pathology; Cell Line, Tumor; E2F Transcription Factors/*genetics/metabolism; Enzyme Assays/methods; Female; Gelatin/metabolism; *Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic; *Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/genetics/metabolism/pathology; Matrix Metalloproteinases/biosynthesis/*genetics/metabolism; Mice; Mice, SCID; Neoplasm Metastasis; Phosphatidylethanolamine Binding Protein/*metabolism; Retinoblastoma Protein/genetics/*metabolism; Transcription, Genetic; Transfection
      12. Abstract :
        The retinoblastoma (Rb)-E2F transcriptional regulatory pathway plays a major role in cell-cycle regulation, but its role in invasion and metastasis is less well understood. We find that many genes involved in the invasion of cancer cells, such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMP), have potential E2F-binding sites in their promoters. E2F-binding sites were predicted on all 23 human MMP gene promoters, many of which harbored multiple E2F-binding sites. Studies presented here show that MMP genes such as MMP9, MMP14, and MMP15 which are overexpressed in non-small cell lung cancer, have multiple E2F-binding sites and are regulated by the Rb-E2F pathway. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed the association of E2F1 with the MMP9, MMP14, and MMP15 promoters, and transient transfection experiments showed that these promoters are E2F responsive. Correspondingly, depletion of E2F family members by RNA interference techniques reduced the expression of these genes with a corresponding reduction in collagen degradation activity. Furthermore, activating Rb by inhibiting the interaction of Raf-1 with Rb by using the Rb-Raf-1 disruptor RRD-251 was sufficient to inhibit MMP transcription. This led to reduced invasion and migration of cancer cells in vitro and metastatic foci development in a tail vein lung metastasis model in mice. These results suggest that E2F transcription factors may play a role in promoting metastasis through regulation of MMP genes and that targeting the Rb-Raf-1 interaction is a promising approach for the treatment of metastatic disease.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22086850
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10525
      1. Author :
        Agarwal, A.; Mackey, M. A.; El-Sayed, M. A.; Bellamkonda, R. V.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        ACS Nano
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        4919-26
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Annexin Vivo, Annexin-Vivo, IVIS, Animals; Antineoplastic Agents/*administration & dosage; Apoptosis; Cell Line, Tumor; Doxorubicin/*administration & dosage; Drug Carriers; Drug Delivery Systems; Female; Glioblastoma/drug therapy; Gold/chemistry; Humans; Liposomes/*chemistry; Metal Nanoparticles/chemistry; Mice; Mice, Nude; Nanostructures/chemistry; Neoplasms/*drug therapy; Polyethylene Glycols/chemistry
      12. Abstract :
        Delivery of chemotherapeutic agents after encapsulation in nanocarriers such as liposomes diminishes side-effects, as PEGylated nanocarrier pharmacokinetics decrease dosing to healthy tissues and accumulate in tumors due to the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Once in the tumor, however, dosing of the chemotherapeutic to tumor cells is limited potentially by the rate of release from the carriers and the size-constrained, poor diffusivity of nanocarriers in tumor interstitium. Here, we report the design and fabrication of a thermosensitive liposomal nanocarrier that maintains its encapsulation stability with a high concentration of doxorubicin payload, thereby minimizing “leak” and attendant toxicity. When used synergistically with PEGylated gold nanorods and near-infrared stimulation, remote triggered release of doxorubicin from thermosensitive liposomes was achieved in a mouse tumor model of human glioblastoma (U87), resulting in a significant increase in efficacy when compared to nontriggered or nonthermosensitive PEGylated liposomes. This enhancement in efficacy is attributed to increase in tumor-site apoptosis, as was evident from noninvasive apoptosis imaging using Annexin-Vivo 750 probe. This strategy affords remotely triggered control of tumor dosing of nanocarrier-encapsulated doxorubicin without sacrificing the ability to differentially dose drugs to tumors via the enhanced permeation and retention effect.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21591812
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10430
      1. Author :
        Sabbagh, Y.; Graciolli, F. G.; O'Brien, S.; Tang, W.; dos Reis, L. M.; Ryan, S.; Phillips, L.; Boulanger, J.; Song, W.; Bracken, C.; Liu, S.; Ledbetter, S.; Dechow, P.; Canziani, M. E.; Carvalho, A. B.; Jorgetti, V.; Moyses, R. M.; Schiavi, S. C.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Bone Miner Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        27
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, Animals; Biopsy; Bone Remodeling; Bone and Bones/metabolism/pathology; Calcification, Physiologic; Cardiovascular Abnormalities/blood/complications/pathology/physiopathology; *Disease Progression; Female; Gene Expression Profiling; Gene Expression Regulation; Glycoproteins/metabolism; Humans; Kidney Failure, Chronic/blood/complications/pathology/physiopathology; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Middle Aged; Mutation/genetics; Osteoclasts/metabolism/pathology; Osteocytes/*metabolism/*pathology; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/genetics; Renal Osteodystrophy/blood/*metabolism/*pathology/physiopathology; Vascular Calcification; *Wnt Signaling Pathway/genetics
      12. Abstract :
        Chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is defined by abnormalities in mineral and hormone metabolism, bone histomorphometric changes, and/or the presence of soft-tissue calcification. Emerging evidence suggests that features of CKD-MBD may occur early in disease progression and are associated with changes in osteocyte function. To identify early changes in bone, we utilized the jck mouse, a genetic model of polycystic kidney disease that exhibits progressive renal disease. At 6 weeks of age, jck mice have normal renal function and no evidence of bone disease but exhibit continual decline in renal function and death by 20 weeks of age, when approximately 40% to 60% of them have vascular calcification. Temporal changes in serum parameters were identified in jck relative to wild-type mice from 6 through 18 weeks of age and were subsequently shown to largely mirror serum changes commonly associated with clinical CKD-MBD. Bone histomorphometry revealed progressive changes associated with increased osteoclast activity and elevated bone formation relative to wild-type mice. To capture the early molecular and cellular events in the progression of CKD-MBD we examined cell-specific pathways associated with bone remodeling at the protein and/or gene expression level. Importantly, a steady increase in the number of cells expressing phosphor-Ser33/37-beta-catenin was observed both in mouse and human bones. Overall repression of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling within osteocytes occurred in conjunction with increased expression of Wnt antagonists (SOST and sFRP4) and genes associated with osteoclast activity, including receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL). The resulting increase in the RANKL/osteoprotegerin (OPG) ratio correlated with increased osteoclast activity. In late-stage disease, an apparent repression of genes associated with osteoblast function was observed. These data confirm that jck mice develop progressive biochemical changes in CKD-MBD and suggest that repression of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of renal osteodystrophy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22492547
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 10
      15. Serial :
        10475
      1. Author :
        Xie, Chao; Liang, Bojian; Xue, Ming; Lin, Angela S.P.; Loiselle, Alayna; Schwarz, Edward M.; Guldberg, Robert E.; O'Keefe, Regis J.; Zhang, Xinping
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Am J Pathol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        175
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen10, Xen 10, Streptococcus pneumoniae Xen10, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        Although the essential role of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in fracture healing is known, the targeted genes and molecular pathways remain unclear. Using prostaglandin E2 receptor (EP)2 and EP4 agonists, we examined the effects of EP receptor activation in compensation for the lack of COX-2 during fracture healing. In a fracture-healing model, COX-2-/- mice showed delayed initiation and impaired endochondral bone repair, accompanied by a severe angiogenesis deficiency. The EP4 agonist markedly improved the impaired healing in COX-2-/- mice, as evidenced by restoration of bony callus formation on day 14, a near complete reversal of bone formation, and an approximately 70% improvement of angiogenesis in the COX-2-/- callus. In comparison, the EP2 agonist only marginally enhanced bone formation in COX-2-/- mice. To determine the differential roles of EP2 and EP4 receptors on COX-2-mediated fracture repair, the effects of selective EP agonists on chondrogenesis were examined in E11.5 long-term limb bud micromass cultures. Only the EP4 agonist significantly increased cartilage nodule formation similar to that observed during prostaglandin E2 treatment. The prostaglandin E2/EP4 agonist also stimulated MMP-9 expression in bone marrow stromal cell cultures. The EP4 agonist further restored the reduction of MMP-9 expression in the COX-2-/- fracture callus. Taken together, our studies demonstrate that EP2 and EP4 have differential functions during endochondral bone repair. Activation of EP4, but not EP2 rescued impaired bone fracture healing in COX-2-/- mice.
      13. URL :
        http://ajp.amjpathol.org/cgi/content/abstract/175/2/772
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10401
      1. Author :
        Phillips, W. T.; Goins, B.; Bao, A.; Vargas, D.; Guttierez, J. E.; Trevino, A.; Miller, J. R.; Henry, J.; Zuniga, R.; Vecil, G.; Brenner, A. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Neuro Oncol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        14
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        416-25
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        U-87 MG-luc2, U-87-MG-luc2, Glioma, Bioware, IVIS, Animals; Brachytherapy/*methods; Brain Neoplasms/pathology/*radiotherapy; Convection; Glioblastoma/pathology/*radiotherapy; Glioma/pathology/*radiotherapy; Liposomes; Nanoparticles/therapeutic use; Radioisotopes/*therapeutic use; Rats; Rhenium/*therapeutic use; Tumor Burden; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Although external beam radiation is an essential component to the current standard treatment of primary brain tumors, its application is limited by toxicity at doses more than 80 Gy. Recent studies have suggested that brachytherapy with liposomally encapsulated radionuclides may be of benefit, and we have reported methods to markedly increase the specific activity of rhenium-186 ((186)Re)-liposomes. To better characterize the potential delivery, toxicity, and efficacy of the highly specific activity of (186)Re-liposomes, we evaluated their intracranial application by convection-enhanced delivery in an orthotopic U87 glioma rat model. After establishing an optimal volume of 25 microL, we observed focal activity confined to the site of injection over a 96-hour period. Doses of up to 1850 Gy were administered without overt clinical or microscopic evidence of toxicity. Animals treated with (186)Re-liposomes had a median survival of 126 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 78.4-173 days), compared with 49 days (95% CI, 44-53 days) for controls. Log-rank analysis between these 2 groups was highly significant (P = .0013) and was even higher when 100 Gy was used as a cutoff (P < .0001). Noninvasive luciferase imaging as a surrogate for tumor volume showed a statistically significant separation in bioluminescence by 11 days after 100 Gy or less treatment between the experimental group and the control animals (chi(2)[1, N= 19] = 4.8; P = .029). MRI also supported this difference in tumor size. Duplication of tumor volume differences and survival benefit was possible in a more invasive U251 orthotopic model, with clear separation in bioluminescence at 6 days after treatment (chi(2)[1, N= 9] = 4.7; P = .029); median survival in treated animals was not reached at 120 days because lack of mortality, and log-rank analysis of survival was highly significant (P = .0057). Analysis of tumors by histology revealed minimal areas of necrosis and gliosis. These results support the potential efficacy of the highly specific activity of brachytherapy by (186)Re-liposomes convection-enhanced delivery in glioma.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22427110
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10500
      1. Author :
        Takaba, J.; Mishima, Y.; Hatake, K.; Kasahara, T.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Mediators of Inflammation
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2010
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        bone marrow cells; Cancer; cell labeling; in vitro; in vivo imaging; Olympus IV-100; tail vein injection; VivoTag 750
      12. Abstract :
        Mucosal damage is a common side effect of many cancer treatments, especially radiotherapy and intensive chemotherapy, which often induce bone marrow (BM) suppression. We observed that acetic acid- (AA-) induced mucosal damage in the colon of mice was worsened by simultaneous treatment with irradiation or 5-FU. However, irradiation 14 days prior to the AA treatment augmented the recovery from mucosal damage, suggesting that the recovery from BM suppression had an advantageous effect on the mucosal repair. In addition, BM transplantation also augmented the recovery from AA-induced mucosal damage. We further confirmed that transplanted BM-derived cells, particularly F4/80+Gr1+ “inflammatory” monocytes (Subset 1), accumulated in the damaged mucosal area in the early healing phase, and both of Subset 1 and F4/80+Gr1- “resident” monocytes (Subset 2) accumulated in this area in later phases. Our results suggest that monocytes/macrophages contribute to the mucosal recovery and regeneration following mucosal damage by anticancer drug therapy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21274263
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 8445
      15. Serial :
        4808
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