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      1. Author :
        Luker, G.D.; Luker, K.E.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Nuclear Medicine: Official Publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        49
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Clinical Medicine; Contrast Media; Diagnostic Imaging; Fluorescence; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; in vivo; in vivo imaging; Luminescent Measurements; Mice; Neoplasm Metastasis; Neoplasms; Optics and Photonics; Peptide Hydrolases; Rats; Signal Transduction; Software; Tomography, Optical
      12. Abstract :
        Optical techniques, such as bioluminescence and fluorescence, are emerging as powerful new modalities for molecular imaging in disease and therapy. Combining innovative molecular biology and chemistry, researchers have developed optical methods for imaging a variety of cellular and molecular processes in vivo, including protein interactions, protein degradation, and protease activity. Whereas optical imaging has been used primarily for research in small-animal models, there are several areas in which optical molecular imaging will translate to clinical medicine. In this review, we summarize recent advances in optical techniques for molecular imaging and the potential impact for clinical medicine.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18077528
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 7444
      15. Serial :
        4477
      1. Author :
        Wunder A and Klohs J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Basic Research in Cardiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        103
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        In vivo imaging; atherosclerosis; bioluminescence imaging; fluorescence imaging; myocardial infarction; stroke; ProSense
      12. Abstract :
        Pathophysiological processes in the vascular system are the major cause of mortality and disease. Atherosclerosis, an inflammatory process in arterial walls, can lead to formation of plaques, whose rupture can lead to thrombus formation, obstruction of vessels (thrombosis), reduction of the blood flow (ischemia), cell death in the tissue fed by the occluded vessel, and depending on the affected vessel, to myocardial infarction or stroke. Imaging techniques enabling visualization of the biological processes involved in this scenario are therefore highly desirable. In recent years, a number of reporter agents and reporter systems have been developed to visualize these processes using different imaging modalities including nuclear imaging techniques, such as positron emission tomography or single photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound. This article comprises a brief overview of optical imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging and bioluminescence imaging for the visualization of vascular pathophysiology.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18324374
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4649
      1. Author :
        Vasilis Ntziachristos
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        The Proceedings of the American Thoracic Society
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Physiology
      11. Keywords :
        ProSense; FMT; fluorescence; tomography; proteases; lung; inflammation; in vivo imaging
      12. Abstract :
        Biomedical imaging has become an important tool in the study of “-omics” fields by allowing the noninvasive visualization of functional and molecular events using in vivo staining and reporter gene approaches. This capacity can go beyond the understanding of the genetic basis and phenotype of such respiratory conditions as acute bronchitis, adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and asthma and investigate the development of disease and of therapeutic events longitudinally and in unperturbed environments. Herein, we show how the application of novel quantitative optical imaging methods, using transillumination and fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT), can allow visualization of pulmonary inflammation in small animals in vivo. The results confirm prior observations using a protease-sensitive probe. We discuss how this approach enables in vivo insights at the system level as to the dynamic role of proteases in respiratory pathophysiology and their potential as therapeutic targets. Overall, the proposed imaging method can be used with a significantly wider range of possible targets and applications in lung imaging.
      13. URL :
        http://pats.atsjournals.org/cgi/content/full/6/5/416
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4534
      1. Author :
        Pesnel, S.; Pillon, A.; Creancier, L.; Lerondel, S.; Le Pape, A.; Recher, C.; Demur, C.; Guilbaud, N.; Kruczynski, A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        7
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        e30690
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        HCT-116-luc2, HCT116-luc2, IVIS, Animals; Antibodies, Monoclonal/administration & dosage/*immunology; Antigens, CD45/metabolism; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic/pathology; Disease Models, Animal; Flow Cytometry; Fluorescent Dyes/*metabolism; Humans; Imaging, Three-Dimensional/*methods; Injections, Intravenous; Leukemia/*diagnosis/*pathology; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/pathology; Longevity; Luminescent Measurements; Mice; Mice, SCID; Reproducibility of Results; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared/*methods
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: The assessment of anticancer agents to treat leukemia needs to have animal models closer to the human pathology such as implantation in immunodeficient mice of leukemic cells from patient samples. A sensitive and early detection of tumor cells in these orthotopic models is a prerequisite for monitoring engraftment of leukemic cells and their dissemination in mice. Therefore, we developed a fluorescent antibody based strategy to detect leukemic foci in mice bearing patient-derived leukemic cells using fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI) to determine when to start treatments with novel antitumor agents. METHODS: Two mAbs against the CD44 human myeloid marker or the CD45 human leukocyte marker were labeled with Alexa Fluor 750 and administered to leukemia-bearing mice after having verified the immunoreactivity in vitro. Bioluminescent leukemic cells (HL60-Luc) were used to compare the colocalization of the fluorescent mAb with these cells. The impact of the labeled antibodies on disease progression was further determined. Finally, the fluorescent hCD45 mAb was tested in mice engrafted with human leukemic cells. RESULTS: The probe labeling did not modify the immunoreactivity of the mAbs. There was a satisfactory correlation between bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and FRI and low doses of mAb were sufficient to detect leukemic foci. However, anti-hCD44 mAb had a strong impact on the tumor proliferation contrary to anti-hCD45 mAb. The use of anti-hCD45 mAb allowed the detection of leukemic patient cells engrafted onto NOD/SCID mice. CONCLUSIONS: A mAb labeled with a near infrared fluorochrome is useful to detect leukemic foci in disseminated models provided that its potential impact on tumor proliferation has been thoroughly documented.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22303450
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10503
      1. Author :
        Herzog, E.; Taruttis, A.; Beziere, N.; Lutich, A. A.; Razansky, D.; Ntziachristos, V.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Radiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        263
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Adenocarcinoma/*diagnosis; Animals; Colonic Neoplasms/*diagnosis; Contrast Media/pharmacokinetics; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Fluorescent Dyes/pharmacokinetics; Gold/pharmacokinetics; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; Indocyanine Green/pharmacokinetics; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental/*diagnosis; Mice; Nanoparticles; Spectrum Analysis/methods; Tomography, Optical/*methods
      12. Abstract :
        PURPOSE: To investigate whether multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT) can reveal the heterogeneous distributions of exogenous agents of interest and vascular characteristics through tumors of several millimeters in diameter in vivo. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Procedures involving animals were approved by the government of Upper Bavaria. Imaging of subcutaneous tumors in mice was performed by using an experimental MSOT setup that produces transverse images at 10 frames per second with an in-plane resolution of approximately 150 mum. To study dynamic contrast enhancement, three mice with 4T1 tumors were imaged before and immediately, 20 minutes, 4 hours, and 24 hours after systemic injection of indocyanine green (ICG). Epifluorescence imaging was used for comparison. MSOT of a targeted fluorescent agent (6 hours after injection) and hemoglobin oxygenation was performed simultaneously (4T1 tumors: n = 3). Epifluorescence of cryosections served as validation. The accumulation owing to enhanced permeability and retention in tumors (4T1 tumors: n = 4, HT29 tumors: n = 3, A2780 tumors: n = 2) was evaluated with use of long-circulating gold nanorods (before and immediately, 1 hour, 5 hours, and 24 hours after injection). Dark-field microscopy was used for validation. RESULTS: Dynamic contrast enhancement with ICG was possible. MSOT, in contrast to epifluorescence imaging, showed a heterogeneous intratumoral agent distribution. Simultaneous imaging of a targeted fluorescent agent and oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin gave functional information about tumor vasculature in addition to the related agent uptake. The accumulation of gold nanorods in tumors seen at MSOT over time also showed heterogeneous uptake. CONCLUSION: MSOT enables live high-spatial-resolution observations through tumors, producing images of distributions of fluorochromes and nanoparticles as well as tumor vasculature.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22517960
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 12
      15. Serial :
        10365
      1. Author :
        Napp, J.; Mathejczyk, J.E.; Alves, F.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Pediatric Radiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        41
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense 680; Cancer; glioblastoma xenograft; mice; tumor vascularization
      12. Abstract :
        To obtain information on the occurrence and location of molecular events as well as to track target-specific probes such as antibodies or peptides, drugs or even cells non-invasively over time, optical imaging (OI) technologies are increasingly applied. Although OI strongly contributes to the advances made in preclinical research, it is so far, with the exception of optical coherence tomography (OCT), only very sparingly applied in clinical settings. Nevertheless, as OI technologies evolve and improve continuously and represent relatively inexpensive and harmful methods, their implementation as clinical tools for the assessment of children disease is increasing. This review focuses on the current preclinical and clinical applications as well as on the future potential of OI in the clinical routine. Herein, we summarize the development of different fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging techniques for microscopic and macroscopic visualization of microstructures and biological processes. In addition, we discuss advantages and limitations of optical probes with distinct mechanisms of target-detection as well as of different bioluminescent reporter systems. Particular attention has been given to the use of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes enabling observation of molecular events in deeper tissue.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21221568
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 8559
      15. Serial :
        4796
      1. Author :
        Keereweer, S.; Kerrebijn, J. D.; van Driel, P. B.; Xie, B.; Kaijzel, E. L.; Snoeks, T. J.; Que, I.; Hutteman, M.; van der Vorst, J. R.; Mieog, J. S.; Vahrmeijer, A. L.; van de Velde, C. J.; Baatenburg de Jong, R. J.; Lowik, C. W.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Mol Imaging Biol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        13
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense,Animals; Fluorescent Dyes/metabolism; Humans; Nanoparticles/diagnostic use; Optics and Photonics/*methods; Surgery, Computer-Assisted/*methods
      12. Abstract :
        In cancer surgery, intra-operative assessment of the tumor-free margin, which is critical for the prognosis of the patient, relies on the visual appearance and palpation of the tumor. Optical imaging techniques provide real-time visualization of the tumor, warranting intra-operative image-guided surgery. Within this field, imaging in the near-infrared light spectrum offers two essential advantages: increased tissue penetration of light and an increased signal-to-background-ratio of contrast agents. In this article, we review the various techniques, contrast agents, and camera systems that are currently used for image-guided surgery. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the wide range of molecular contrast agents targeting specific hallmarks of cancer and we describe perspectives on its future use in cancer surgery.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20617389
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10367
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Molecular Imaging and Biology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        Optical imaging, Image-guided surgery, Molecular imaging, Near-infrared fluorescence
      12. Abstract :
        In cancer surgery, intra-operative assessment of the tumor-free margin, which is critical for the prognosis of the patient, relies on the visual appearance and palpation of the tumor. Optical imaging techniques provide real-time visualization of the tumor, warranting intra-operative image-guided surgery. Within this field, imaging in the near-infrared light spectrum offers two essential advantages: increased tissue penetration of light and an increased signal-tobackground-ratio of contrast agents. In this article, we review the various techniques, contrast agents, and camera systems that are currently used for image-guided surgery. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the wide range of molecular contrast agents targeting specific hallmarks of cancer and we describe perspectives on its future use in cancer surgery.
      13. URL :
        http://www.springerlink.com/content/78233815221t6563/
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4486
      1. Author :
        Farouc A. Jaffer, Peter Libby and Ralph Weissleder
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        29
      8. Issue :
        7
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        In vivo imaging; fluorescence molecular tomography; FMT; ProSense; OsteoSense; atherosclerosis; molecular imaging; optical, fluorescence; multimodality; nanoparticle
      12. Abstract :
        Imaging approaches that visualize molecular targets rather than anatomic structures aim to illuminate vital molecular and cellular aspects of atherosclerosis biology in vivo. Several such molecular imaging strategies stand ready for rapid clinical application. This review describes the growing role of in vivo optical molecular imaging in atherosclerosis and highlights its ability to visualize atheroma inflammation, calcification, and angiogenesis. In addition, we discuss advances in multimodality probes, both in the context of multimodal imaging as well as multifunctional, or “theranostic,” nanoparticles. This review highlights particular molecular imaging strategies that possess strong potential for clinical translation.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2733228/?tool=pubmed
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4642
      1. Author :
        Snoeks, T. J.; Khmelinskii, A.; Lelieveldt, B. P.; Kaijzel, E. L.; Lowik, C. W.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Bone
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        48
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Bone Neoplasms/radionuclide imaging/*secondary; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Forecasting; Optics and Photonics/*trends; Positron-Emission Tomography/methods; Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon/methods; X-Ray Microtomography/methods; X-Rays
      12. Abstract :
        Optical Imaging has evolved into one of the standard molecular imaging modalities used in pre-clinical cancer research. Bone research however, strongly depends on other imaging modalities such as SPECT, PET, x-ray and muCT. Each imaging modality has its own specific strengths and weaknesses concerning spatial resolution, sensitivity and the possibility to quantify the signal. An increasing number of bone specific optical imaging models and probes have been developed over the past years. This review gives an overview of optical imaging modalities, models and probes that can be used to study skeletal complications of cancer in small laboratory animals.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20688203
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 19
      15. Serial :
        10378
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