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      1. Author :
        Georgel, Philippe; Crozat, Karine; Lauth, Xavier; Makrantonaki, Evgenia; Seltmann, Holger; Sovath, Sosathya; Hoebe, Kasper; Du, Xin; Rutschmann, Sophie; Jiang, Zhengfan; Bigby, Timothy; Nizet, Victor; Zouboulis, Christos C; Beutler, Bruce
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Infection and immunity
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        73
      8. Issue :
        8
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bioware; Chromosome Mapping; Eye Diseases; Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated; Likelihood Functions; Lod Score; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Oleic Acid; Receptors, Immunologic; Sequence Analysis, DNA; Skin; Staphylococcal Skin Infections; Stearoyl-CoA Desaturase; Streptococcus pyogenes; Time Factors; Toll-Like Receptor 2; Xen8.1, Xen20, Xen14
      12. Abstract :
        flake (flk), an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced recessive germ line mutation of C57BL/6 mice, impairs the clearance of skin infections by Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus, gram-positive pathogens that elicit innate immune responses by activating Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Positional cloning and sequencing revealed that flk is a novel allele of the stearoyl coenzyme A desaturase 1 gene (Scd1). flake homozygotes show reduced sebum production and are unable to synthesize the monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) palmitoleate (C(16:1)) and oleate (C(18:1)), both of which are bactericidal against gram-positive (but not gram-negative) organisms in vitro. However, intradermal MUFA administration to S. aureus-infected mice partially rescues the flake phenotype, which indicates that an additional component of the sebum may be required to improve bacterial clearance. In normal mice, transcription of Scd1-a gene with numerous NF-kappaB elements in its promoter--is strongly and specifically induced by TLR2 signaling. Similarly, the SCD1 gene is induced by TLR2 signaling in a human sebocyte cell line. These observations reveal the existence of a regulated, lipid-based antimicrobial effector pathway in mammals and suggest new approaches to the treatment or prevention of infections with gram-positive bacteria.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16040962
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9990
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Nature
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        433
      8. Issue :
        7025
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aging; Animals; Antigens, CD36; Cell Line; Dimerization; Ethylnitrosourea; Gene Deletion; Glycerides; Homozygote; Humans; Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes; Lipopeptides; Membrane Glycoproteins; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; Mutagenesis; Mutation; Oligopeptides; Peptidoglycan; Phenotype; Receptors, Cell Surface; Signal Transduction; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Toll-Like Receptor 2; Toll-Like Receptors; Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; Zymosan
      12. Abstract :
        Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) is required for the recognition of numerous molecular components of bacteria, fungi and protozoa. The breadth of the ligand repertoire seems unusual, even if one considers that TLR2 may form heteromers with TLRs 1 and 6 (ref. 12), and it is likely that additional proteins serve as adapters for TLR2 activation. Here we show that an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced nonsense mutation of Cd36 (oblivious) causes a recessive immunodeficiency phenotype in which macrophages are insensitive to the R-enantiomer of MALP-2 (a diacylated bacterial lipopeptide) and to lipoteichoic acid. Homozygous mice are hypersusceptible to Staphylococcus aureus infection. Cd36(obl) macrophages readily detect S-MALP-2, PAM(2)CSK(4), PAM(3)CSK(4) and zymosan, revealing that some--but not all--TLR2 ligands are dependent on CD36. Already known as a receptor for endogenous molecules, CD36 is also a selective and nonredundant sensor of microbial diacylglycerides that signal via the TLR2/6 heterodimer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15690042
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9991
      1. Author :
        Kuklin, Nelly A; Pancari, Gregory D; Tobery, Timothy W; Cope, Leslie; Jackson, Jesse; Gill, Charles; Overbye, Karen; Francis, Kevin P; Yu, Jun; Montgomery, Donna; Anderson, Annaliesa S; McClements, William; Jansen, Kathrin U
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2003
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        47
      8. Issue :
        9
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Abscess; Acetamides; Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bioware; Catheterization; Colony Count, Microbial; Dose-Response Relationship, Drug; Female; Foreign Bodies; Luminescent Measurements; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Muscle, Skeletal; Oxazolidinones; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Thigh; Time Factors; Wound Infection; Xen8.1
      12. Abstract :
        Staphylococcal infections associated with catheter and prosthetic implants are difficult to eradicate and often lead to chronic infections. Development of novel antibacterial therapies requires simple, reliable, and relevant models for infection. Using bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus, we have adapted the existing foreign-body and deep-wound mouse models of staphylococcal infection to allow real-time monitoring of the bacterial colonization of catheters or tissues. This approach also enables kinetic measurements of bacterial growth and clearance in each infected animal. Persistence of infection was observed throughout the course of the study until termination of the experiment at day 16 in a deep-wound model and day 21 in the foreign-body model, providing sufficient time to test the effects of antibacterial compounds. The usefulness of both animal models was assessed by using linezolid as a test compound and comparing bioluminescent measurements to bacterial counts. In the foreign-body model, a three-dose antibiotic regimen (2, 5, and 24 h after infection) resulted in a decrease in both luminescence and bacterial counts recovered from the implant compared to those of the mock-treated infected mice. In addition, linezolid treatment prevented the formation of subcutaneous abscesses, although it did not completely resolve the infection. In the thigh model, the same treatment regimen resulted in complete resolution of the luminescent signal, which correlated with clearance of the bacteria from the thighs.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12936968
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9992
      1. Author :
        Lambrechts, Saskia A G; Demidova, Tatiana N; Aalders, Maurice C G; Hasan, Tayyaba; Hamblin, Michael R
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Photochemical & photobiological sciences: Official journal of the European Photochemistry Association and the European Society for Photobiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        4
      8. Issue :
        7
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Burns; Mice; Photochemotherapy; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen8.1
      12. Abstract :
        The rise of multiply antibiotic resistant bacteria has led to searches for novel antimicrobial therapies to treat infections. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a potential candidate; it uses the combination of a photosensitizer with visible light to produce reactive oxygen species that lead to cell death. We used PDT mediated by meso-mono-phenyl-tri(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)-porphyrin (PTMPP) to treat burn wounds in mice with established Staphylococcus aureus infections The third degree burn wounds were infected with bioluminescent S. aureus. PDT was applied after one day of bacterial growth by adding a 25% DMSO/500 microM PTMPP solution to the wound followed by illumination with red light and periodic imaging of the mice using a sensitive camera to detect the bioluminescence. More than 98% of the bacteria were eradicated after a light dose of 210 J cm(-2) in the presence of PTMPP. However, bacterial re-growth was observed. Light alone or PDT both delayed the wound healing. These data suggest that PDT has the potential to rapidly reduce the bacterial load in infected burns. The treatment needs to be optimized to reduce wound damage and prevent recurrence.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15986057
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9993
      1. Author :
        Shi, Lei; Takahashi, Kazue; Dundee, Joseph; Shahroor-Karni, Sarit; Thiel, Steffen; Jensenius, Jens Christian; Gad, Faten; Hamblin, Michael R; Sastry, Kedarnath N; Ezekowitz, R Alan B
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2004
      5. Publication :
        The Journal of experimental medicine
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        199
      8. Issue :
        10
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Disease Susceptibility; DNA, Bacterial; Lung; Mannose-Binding Lectin; Mice; Mice, Knockout; Reference Values; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction; Spleen; Staphylococcal Infections; Xen8.1
      12. Abstract :
        Gram-positive organisms like Staphylococcus aureus are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Humoral response molecules together with phagocytes play a role in host responses to S. aureus. The mannose-binding lectin (MBL, also known as mannose-binding protein) is an oligomeric serum molecule that recognizes carbohydrates decorating a broad range of infectious agents including S. aureus. Circumstantial evidence in vitro and in vivo suggests that MBL plays a key role in first line host defense. We tested this contention directly in vivo by generating mice that were devoid of all MBL activity. We found that 100% of MBL-null mice died 48 h after exposure to an intravenous inoculation of S. aureus compared with 45% mortality in wild-type mice. Furthermore, we demonstrated that neutrophils and MBL are required to limit intraperitoneal infection with S. aureus. Our study provides direct evidence that MBL plays a key role in restricting the complications associated with S. aureus infection in mice and raises the idea that the MBL gene may act as a disease susceptibility gene against staphylococci infections in humans.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15148336
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9994
      1. Author :
        Yang, Li; Johansson, Jan; Ridsdale, Ross; Willander, Hanna; Fitzen, Michael; Akinbi, Henry T; Weaver, Timothy E
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        184
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid; Hydrogen-Ion Concentration; Immunity, Innate; Klebsiella pneumoniae; Macrophages, Alveolar; Mice; Mice, Transgenic; Protein Precursors; Protein Structure, Tertiary; Proteolipids; Saposins; Staphylococcus aureus; Tissue Distribution; Xen5
      12. Abstract :
        Surfactant protein B (SP-B) proprotein contains three saposin-like protein (SAPLIP) domains: a SAPLIP domain corresponding to the mature SP-B peptide is essential for lung function and postnatal survival; the function of SAPLIP domains in the N-terminal (SP-BN) and C-terminal regions of the proprotein is not known. In the current study, SP-BN was detected in the supernatant of mouse bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and in nonciliated bronchiolar cells, alveolar type II epithelial cells, and alveolar macrophages. rSP-BN indirectly promoted the uptake of bacteria by macrophage cell lines and directly killed bacteria at acidic pH, consistent with a lysosomal, antimicrobial function. Native SP-BN isolated from BALF also killed bacteria but only at acidic pH; the bactericidal activity of BALF at acidic pH was completely blocked by SP-BN Ab. Transgenic mice overexpressing SP-BN and mature SP-B peptide had significantly decreased bacterial burden and increased survival following intranasal inoculation with bacteria. These findings support the hypothesis that SP-BN contributes to innate host defense of the lung by supplementing the nonoxidant antimicrobial defenses of alveolar macrophages.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20007532
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9995
      1. Author :
        Bucki, Robert; Leszczynska, Katarzyna; Byfield, Fitzroy J; Fein, David E; Won, Esther; Cruz, Katrina; Namiot, Andrzej; Kulakowska, Alina; Namiot, Zbigniew; Savage, Paul B; Diamond, Scott L; Janmey, Paul A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        54
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Anti-Inflammatory Agents; Bacterial Infections; Biofilms; Cathelicidins; Cattle; Cells, Cultured; Dexamethasone; Drug Design; Humans; Interleukins; Macrophages; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Neutrophils; Phagocytosis; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Receptors, Glucocorticoid; Spermine; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen5
      12. Abstract :
        The rising number of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains represents an emerging health problem that has motivated efforts to develop new antibacterial agents. Endogenous cationic antibacterial peptides (CAPs) that are produced in tissues exposed to the external environment are one model for the design of novel antibacterial compounds. Here, we report evidence that disubstituted dexamethasone-spermine (D2S), a cationic corticosteroid derivative initially identified as a by-product of synthesis of dexamethasone-spermine (DS) for the purpose of improving cellular gene delivery, functions as an antibacterial peptide-mimicking molecule. This moiety exhibits bacterial killing activity against clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa present in cystic fibrosis (CF) sputa, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm. Although compromised in the presence of plasma, D2S antibacterial activity resists the proteolytic activity of pepsin and is maintained in ascites, cerebrospinal fluid, saliva, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. D2S also enhances S. aureus susceptibility to antibiotics, such as amoxicillin (AMC), tetracycline (T), and amikacin (AN). Inhibition of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 release from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- or lipoteichoic acid (LTA)-treated neutrophils in the presence of D2S suggests that this molecule might also prevent systemic inflammation caused by bacterial wall products. D2S-mediated translocation of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in bovine aorta endothelial cells (BAECs) suggests that some of its anti-inflammatory activities involve engagement of glucocorticoid receptors. The combined antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities of D2S suggest its potential as an alternative to natural CAPs in the prevention and treatment of some bacterial infections.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20308375
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9996
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Lasers in surgery and medicine
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        39
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Anti-Infective Agents; Biofilms; Dental Pulp Cavity; Dental Pulp Diseases; Endodontics; Humans; Luminescence; Photochemotherapy; Polyethyleneimine; Porphyrins; Proteus Infections; Proteus mirabilis; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Pseudomonas Infections; Xen5; Xen44
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE To compare the effectiveness of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT), standard endodontic treatment and the combined treatment to eliminate bacterial biofilms present in infected root canals. STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND METHODS Ten single-rooted freshly extracted human teeth were inoculated with stable bioluminescent Gram-negative bacteria, Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to form 3-day biofilms in prepared root canals. Bioluminescence imaging was used to serially quantify bacterial burdens. PDT employed a conjugate between polyethylenimine and chlorin(e6) as the photosensitizer (PS) and 660-nm diode laser light delivered into the root canal via a 200-micro fiber, and this was compared and combined with standard endodontic treatment using mechanical debridement and antiseptic irrigation. RESULTS Endodontic therapy alone reduced bacterial bioluminescence by 90% while PDT alone reduced bioluminescence by 95%. The combination reduced bioluminescence by >98%, and importantly the bacterial regrowth observed 24 hours after treatment was much less for the combination (P<0.0005) than for either single treatment. CONCLUSIONS Bioluminescence imaging is an efficient way to monitor endodontic therapy. Antimicrobial PDT may have a role to play in optimized endodontic therapy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17066481
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9997
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Brazilian dental journal
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        18
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Colony Count, Microbial; Cuspid; Dental Pulp Cavity; Disinfectants; Drug Combinations; Genetic Engineering; Humans; Hydrogen peroxide; Incisor; Luminescent Measurements; Luminescent Proteins; Maxilla; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Root Canal Irrigants; Root Canal Preparation; Sensitivity and Specificity; Sodium Hypochlorite; Xen5
      12. Abstract :
        Microbial infection plays an important role in the development of pulp necrosis and formation of periapical lesions. In vitro and in vivo research in this field, traditionally microbiological culture methods using paper point sampling and quantitative culture, faces difficulties in completely removing bacteria from the root canal system and analyzing sequential procedures. This study employed genetically engineered bioluminescent bacteria and a light-sensitive imaging system to allow real-time visualization of the infection. Ten extracted teeth incubated with P. aeruginosa were treated by mechanical instrumentation with K-files (#30 K-file, #35 K-file and #40 K-file) and chemical irrigation with sodium hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide. Irrigation alone reduced the contamination in 18%; the first chemomechanical sequence (instrumentation with a #30 K-file + irrigation) provided 41% of reduction; the second sequence (#35 K-file + irrigation) achieved 62%; and the complete therapy (#30 K-file + #35 K-file + #40 K-file + irrigation) achieved 93% of bacterial reduction. These results suggest that the endodontic treatment is dependent on the association of a chemical and mechanical approaches and that root canal enlargement improves bacterial reduction probably because the irrigation has more access to the apical third.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18176710
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9998
      1. Author :
        Sadikot, Ruxana T; Zeng, Heng; Yull, Fiona E; Li, Bo; Cheng, Dong-sheng; Kernodle, Douglas S; Jansen, E Duco; Contag, Christopher H; Segal, Brahm H; Holland, Steven M; Blackwell, Timothy S; Christman, John W
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2004
      5. Publication :
        Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        172
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Cells, Cultured; Dose-Response Relationship, Immunologic; Immunity, Innate; Lung; Macrophages; Membrane Glycoproteins; Mice; Mice, Inbred C3H; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Inbred DBA; Mice, Transgenic; NADPH Oxidase; Neutrophil Infiltration; NF-kappa B; Phosphoproteins; Pneumonia, Bacterial; Pseudomonas Infections; Receptors, Cell Surface; Signal Transduction; Toll-Like Receptors; Xen5
      12. Abstract :
        We examined the role of redox signaling generated by NADPH oxidase in activation of NF-kappaB and host defense against Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Using mice with an NF-kappaB-driven luciferase reporter construct (HIV-LTR/luciferase (HLL)), we found that intratracheal administration of P. aeruginosa resulted in a dose-dependent neutrophilic influx and activation of NF-kappaB. To determine the effects of reactive oxygen species generated by the NADPH oxidase system on activation of NF-kappaB, we crossbred mice deficient in p47(phox) with NF-kappaB reporter mice (p47(phox-/-)HLL). These p47(phox-/-)HLL mice were unable to activate NF-kappaB to the same degree as HLL mice with intact NADPH oxidase following P. aeruginosa infection. In addition, lung TNF-alpha levels were significantly lower in p47(phox-/-)HLL mice compared with HLL mice. Bacterial clearance was impaired in p47(phox-/-)HLL mice. In vitro studies using bone marrow-derived macrophages showed that Toll-like receptor 4 was necessary for NF-kappaB activation following treatment with P. aeruginosa. Additional studies with macrophages from p47(phox-/-) mice confirmed that redox signaling was necessary for maximal Toll-like receptor 4-dependent NF-kappaB activation in this model. These data indicate that the NADPH oxidase-dependent respiratory burst stimulated by Pseudomonas infection contributes to host defense by modulating redox-dependent signaling through the NF-kappaB pathway.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14734763
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9999
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