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      1. Author :
        Kristof Schutters and Chris Reutelingsperger
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Apoptosis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        15
      8. Issue :
        9
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Apoptosis; Phosphatidylserine; Annexin A5; Molecular Imaging; Targeted Drug Delivery; in vivo imaging; FMT; fluorescence molecular tomography; Annexin-Vivo
      12. Abstract :
        Cells are able to execute apoptosis by activating series of specific biochemical reactions. One of the most prominent characteristics of cell death is the externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS), which in healthy cells resides predominantly in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. These features have made PS-externalization a well-explored phenomenon to image cell death for diagnostic purposes. In addition, it was demonstrated that under certain conditions viable cells express PS at their surface such as endothelial cells of tumor blood vessels, stressed tumor cells and hypoxic cardiomyocytes. Hence, PS has become a potential target for therapeutic strategies aiming at Targeted Drug Delivery. In this review we highlight the biomarker PS and various PS-binding compounds that have been employed to target PS for diagnostic purposes. We emphasize the 35 kD human protein annexin A5, that has been developed as a Molecular Imaging agent to measure cell death in vitro, and non-invasively in vivo in animal models and in patients with cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Recently focus has shifted from diagnostic towards therapeutic applications employing annexin A5 in strategies to deliver drugs to cells that express PS at their surface.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2929432/?tool=pubmed
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4562
      1. Author :
        Thomas Reiner, Rainer H. Kohler, Chong Wee Liew, Jonathan Hill, Jason Gaglia, Rohit Kulkarni and Ralph Weissleder
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Bioconjugate Chemistry
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        21
      8. Issue :
        7
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Metabolic Disorders
      11. Keywords :
        Beta-cells; GLP1-R; imaging; targeting; in vivo imaging; VivoTag; AngioSense; Diabetes
      12. Abstract :
        The ability to image and ultimately quantitate beta-cell mass in vivo will likely have far reaching implications in the study of diabetes biology, in the monitoring of disease progression or response to treatment, as well as for drug development. Here, using animal models, we report on the synthesis, characterization of, and intravital microscopic imaging properties of a near infrared fluorescent exendin-4 analogue with specificity for the GLP-1 receptor on beta cells (E4K12-Fl). The agent demonstrated sub-nanomolar EC50 binding concentrations, with high specificity and binding could be inhibited by GLP-1R agonists. Following intravenous administration to mice, pancreatic islets were readily distinguishable from exocrine pancreas, achieving target-to-background ratios within the pancreas of 6:1, as measured by intravital microscopy. Serial imaging revealed rapid accumulation kinetics (with initial signal within the islets detectable within 3 minutes and peak fluorescence within 20 minutes of injection) making this an ideal agent for in vivo imaging.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2912453/?tool=pubmed
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4561
      1. Author :
        Kim DE, Kim JY, Schellingerhout D, Shon SM, Jeong SW, Kim EJ and Kim WK
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Molecular Imaging
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        8
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        ProSense; in vivo imaging
      12. Abstract :
        Inflammation in atherosclerotic plaques causes plaque vulnerability and rupture, leading to thromboembolic complications. Cathepsin B (CatB) proteases secreted by macrophages play a major role in plaque inflammation. We used a CatB-activatable near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging agent to demonstrate the inflammatory component in mice atheromata and the atherosclerosis- modulating effects of atorvastatin or glucosamine treatments. Apolipoprotein E knockout mice (n = 35) were fed normal chow, a Western diet, a Western diet + atorvastatin, a Western diet + glucosamine, or a Western diet + atorvastatin + glucosamine for 14 weeks. Twenty-four hours after the intravenous injection of a CatB-activatable probe, ex vivo NIRF imaging of the aortas and brains was performed, followed by histology. The CatB-related signal, observed in the aortas but not in the cerebral arteries, correlated very well with protease activity and the presence of macrophages on histology. Animals on Western diets could be distinguished from animals on a normal diet. The antiatherosclerotic effects of atorvastatin and glucosamine could be demonstrated, with reduced CatB-related signal compared with untreated animals. Plaque populations were heterogeneous within individuals, with some plaques showing a high and others a lower CatB-related signal. These differences in signal intensity could not be predicted by visual inspection of the plaques but did correlate with histologic evidence of inflammation in every case. This suggests that vulnerable inflamed plaques can be identified by optical molecular imaging.
      13. URL :
        http://www.bcdecker.com/pubMedLinkOut.aspx?pub=MIO&vol=8&iss=5&page=291
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4558
      1. Author :
        Zongjin Li, Kitchener D. Wilson, Bryan Smith, Daniel L. Kraft, Fangjun Jia, Mei Huang, Xiaoyan Xie, Robert C. Robbins, Sanjiv S. Gambhir, Irving L. Weissman and Joseph C. Wu
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        4
      8. Issue :
        12
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        in vivo imaging; human embryonic stem cells; hESCs; endothelial cells; ECs; AngioSense
      12. Abstract :
        Background: Differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into endothelial cells (hESC-ECs) has the potential to provide an unlimited source of cells for novel transplantation therapies of ischemic diseases by supporting angiogenesis and vasculogenesis. However, the endothelial differentiation efficiency of the conventional embryoid body (EB) method is low while the 2-dimensional method of co-culturing with mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) require animal product, both of which can limit the future clinical application of hESC-ECs. Moreover, to fully understand the beneficial effects of stem cell therapy, investigators must be able to track the functional biology and physiology of transplanted cells in living subjects over time.

        Methodology: In this study, we developed an extracellular matrix (ECM) culture system for increasing endothelial differentiation and free from contaminating animal cells. We investigated the transcriptional changes that occur during endothelial differentiation of hESCs using whole genome microarray, and compared to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We also showed functional vascular formation by hESC-ECs in a mouse dorsal window model. Moreover, our study is the first so far to transplant hESC-ECs in a myocardial infarction model and monitor cell fate using molecular imaging methods.

        Conclusion: Taken together, we report a more efficient method for derivation of hESC-ECs that express appropriate patterns of endothelial genes, form functional vessels in vivo, and improve cardiac function. These studies suggest that hESC-ECs may provide a novel therapy for ischemic heart disease in the future.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2795856/?tool=pubmed
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4557
      1. Author :
        Marcella A. Calfon, Claudio Vinegoni, Vasilis Ntziachristos and Farouc A. Jaffer
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Biomedical Optics
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        15
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        in vivo imaging; Cat K FAST; Cat B FAST; MMPSense
      12. Abstract :
        New imaging methods are urgently needed to identify high-risk atherosclerotic lesions prior to the onset of myocardial infarction, stroke, and ischemic limbs. Molecular imaging offers a new approach to visualize key biological features that characterize high-risk plaques associated with cardiovascular events. While substantial progress has been realized in clinical molecular imaging of plaques in larger arterial vessels (carotid, aorta, iliac), there remains a compelling, unmet need to develop molecular imaging strategies targeted to high-risk plaques in human coronary arteries. We present recent developments in intravascular near-IR fluorescence catheter-based strategies for in vivo detection of plaque inflammation in coronary-sized arteries. In particular, the biological, light transmission, imaging agent, and engineering principles that underlie a new intravascular near-IR fluorescence sensing method are discussed. Intravascular near-IR fluorescence catheters appear highly translatable to the cardiac catheterization laboratory, and thus may offer a new in vivo method to detect high-risk coronary plaques and to assess novel atherosclerosis biologics.
      13. URL :
        http://spiedl.aip.org/getabs/servlet/GetabsServlet?prog=normal&id=JBOPFO000015000001011107000001&idtype=cvips&gifs=yes&ref=no
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4556
      1. Author :
        Luis Rodriguez-Menocal1, Yuntao Wei1, Si M. Pham, Melissa St-Pierre, Sen Li, Keith Webster, Pascal Goldschmidt-Clermont and Roberto I. Vazquez-Padron
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Atherosclerosis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        209
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        In-stent restenosis; Mouse; Stent; Animal model; in vivo imaging; MMPSense FAST; FMT
      12. Abstract :
        Background and aims: In-stent restenosis (ISR) is the major complication that occurs after percutaneous coronary interventions to facilitate coronary revascularization. Herein we described a simple and cost-effective model, which reproduces important features of ISR in the mouse.

        Methods and results: Microvascular bare metal stents were successfully implanted in the abdominal aorta of atherosclerotic ApoE-null mice. Patency of implanted stents was interrogated using ultrasound biomicroscopy. Aortas were harvested at different time points after implantation and processed for histopathological analysis. Thrombus formation was histologically detected after 1 day. Leukocyte adherence and infiltration were evident after 7 days and decreased thereafter. Neointimal formation, neointimal thickness and luminal stenosis simultaneously increased up to 28 days after stent implantation. Using multichannel fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) for spatiotemporal resolution of MMP activities, we observed that MMP activity in the stented aorta of Apo-E null mice was 2-fold higher than that of wild-type mice. Finally, we compared neointimal formation in response to stenting in two genetically different mouse strains. In-stent neointimas in FVB/NJ mice were 2-fold thicker than in C57BL/6J mice (p=0.002).

        Conclusion: We have developed a model that can take advantage of the multiple genetic resources available for the mouse to study the mechanisms of in-stent restenosis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.atherosclerosis-journal.com/article/S0021-9150(09)00825-9/abstract
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4555
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